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The Red Badger Award

Posted on September 02, 2016 by RedBuilt


Persistence in problem solving. Never giving up. Doing whatever it takes to service the needs of the customer. These are “Badger-like” behaviors that exemplify RedBuilt™ associates who win the annual Red Badger award.  Here are two stories of Red Badger winners…

Ed Medley is a line supervisor at the Hillsboro, Oregon plant. During a regular workday, Ed learned of a customer who needed material in Burley, Idaho for a cannery remodel. Equipped with a truck and trailer, Ed road-tripped it from the Stayton, Oregon plant to Burley (close to 600 miles one way!). The contractor was a bit surprised – and relieved – to see Ed on an early Saturday morning with the needed RedLam™ LVL.

“It seemed like the right thing to do – help the customer as much as possible,” explains Ed. “Plus, it was a nice road trip.”

At the Delaware, Ohio office, David Cortnik works in the design center preparing and approving shop drawings for tech reps and customers. Leading up to the summer of 2015 – the busiest time for the design center – David took a risk to unofficially step into a leadership role.

The Design Center had experienced personnel changes and the design team needed direction and coaching, and David rose to the challenge. He kept the team moving to complete the design and drafting jobs that needed processed and while simultaneously implementing significant improvements in how the work is processed. David recently earned his Professional Engineers license, participates in the continuous improvement and safety committees, and continues to coach and mentor others while keeping up with the design needs of the Delaware office and external sales team.

Congratulations David on the P.E. and thank you to David and Ed for demonstrating Badger-like behaviors.


Leave a Reply

Did you notice that on page 4 we are showing table fabrication at our Stayton, OR facility? If so, you have a good eye and you probably work at Stayton! But fabrication looks about the same in Delaware.

By Cornelia Sprung on 2015 04 27.

I am interested in finding out more about RedBuild open web floor joist for residential.

For the past 15 years we have desiign our floors for L480 (even with dimensioal lumber) We pour 10’ basement walls, use TJI’s and end up boxing around mechanicals and spendind to much time and money firestopping and drafrstopping for the new IRC and IBC. Were can I get more info on RedBiuld Open web Joist

By Rolling Rock Construction Co on 2014 07 03.

Not sure why but I found your closing line hilarious. Probably because it’s corny, however it’s probably true as well! Good to know everything went well in the process. Shoppers will definitely be happy Im sure!

By Angela - Chicago Garage Builders on 2013 10 10.

Fantastic win against Scotland. Absalotely great. I curled against your Dad. was a wonderful man. I grew up on the farm where Art and Aggie now live. We have retired to Athabasca an d winter in Mesa, Az. watch all the. Curling to keep cool. best wishes at the Olympics next year. continue success .  Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 03.

Thank you for your support Mr. Ruddick. Team USA and RedBuilt are very appreciative.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Thanks Henry,

I am from Perryvale, my Dad was Ernie Lehto. Would have been great if he could have been here to watch. One tough end against both Sweden and Canada yesterday, but we will bounce back today.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Congratulations on being part of the worlds curling. Are you from the lehto family and which one from perryvale . Very best of luck. We are curling fans and watch all the games. Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 01.

A dedicated redbuilt blog reader.. Thanks for the curling coverage. Congratulations Darren and go team USA.

By bill ruddick on 2013 03 31.

Here is Heinz Mueller’s response:

You are correct, Renaldo. This application would show up more in a commercial structure vs. a residential structure. For an application such as this, I would think a moisture sealant applied to the glulam material would help alleviate the potential issues. That being said, if you decided to go that route you would probably want to start weighing the cost/benefit ratio for using additional products/services (sealant & application) vs. using similar products (LVL, I-joist blocking, etc.) for the blocking/rim board in the floor/roof system. I hope that helps. Thank you for the question and for your interest in the RedBuilt blogs! Heinz

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Here is a great reply that was posted to RedBuilt’s Linked In page:

Renaldo Montenegro, I am going to assume that using Glulams for blocking is more suited for a commercial application rather than a residential application. Thus, the Glulams carrying a very large vertical load from above. In a residential use I would see this as an over kill. Yes, I agree on the moisture content of the Glulams shrinking. Would a moisture sealant applied on the Glulams’ work in this case? A very good article! Thanks for sharing.

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Great to to hear this!!!

By Renaldo Montenegro on 2012 10 17.

Epically informative.  I learned a lot.

By Greg Riley on 2012 10 12.

[...] Posted on October 10, 2012 by [...]

By Deeper is Cheaper | RedBuilt Blog | Michael T. Dai on 2012 10 10.

[...] Call your local representative for a no cost consultation.  Read part 1 here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? (Part 2) | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 18.

[...] Read Part 2 of this article here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 17.

Great article Tom.  Not to intrude, but I would like to expand on how the Redbuilt Design Centers can help the engineer of record.  When I say help, I really mean increase the EOR’s profits while specifying a safer structural roof/floor system.  As I think back to my time as a specifying engineer, specifying Redbuilt’s Open Web trusses saved me time (I can go on about the differences between Redbuilt’s Pin Connected Open Web trusses and plated trusses but that is for another time).  When an EOR saves time, they in essence increase profits.

How does Redbuilt save an EOR time (great question)?  We do all the gravity calculations and truss connections for every loading aspect of a roof/floor system.  All the EOR has to do is specify a truss depth, truss series, show all design loads required and maybe a connection detail or two (with or without the help of a Redbuilt technical representative).  Also, if the EOR requires a PE to stamp both the shop drawing and calculations, our internal designers and engineers will provide technical oversight and assurance that products are used as intended. 

Not only can we save an EOR time but we also provide some assurance and piece of mind.

By Guy Brousseau on 2012 08 23.

Interesting to read about what you are doing, Jason.

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 29.

Sorry for the late response.  I’m glad you have enjoyed the first two.  The third was posted this past week.  It was a fun experience.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 28.

I know that learning involves failure, so thank you for being humble enough to learn.
Thank you, too, for sharing.  I’m enjoying your journey.

By Kathy Bracisco on 2012 07 24.

There is more to come.  This story will continue over the next few weeks and the whole world will know whether I was right or not.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I don’t want to give anything away because this story will continue over the next few weeks.  It was definitely an educational and enjoyable experience that I’m glad to share.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I’m guessing that you accurately predicted the failure.  I’m not an engineer, but you certainly made this understandable enough to read at my level.  Best wishes as you go for Level II!!

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 12.

Very interesting! I’m sure you will be right on.

By Norm Watts on 2012 07 12.

Thanks for the differentation of RedBuilt products.  I forwarded to two customers who wanted to know more about RedForm I joists vs. the “look alikes.”

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 25.

It is great to be a part of the legacy.  Thank you for sharing some perspective on what you are seeing both large-scale in the economy, and how the RedBuilt/legacy Trus Joist business has weathered storms in the past.

By Jeff Jack on 2012 06 23.

I like the blog and appreciate the wisdom in your words.  The focus on thriving vs. surviving is an inspiring shift of perspective.  Not easy, but RedBuilt will thrive without a doubt.  If it were easy everyone would be doing it.  RedBuilt has created a toe hold and a beginning.  Carry on.

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 20.

Hey Kurt -
I enjoyed reading this post about the old Tj and dealing with the last great recession.  I still remember those “PBL” days, wondering as a new hire if I would walk into work one day and find out that I didn’t have a job.  Fortunately that never happened, and I enjoyed the heck out of working for a great company like Trus Joist.
You guys at RedBuilt have got the old Tj culture and believe me, that will help drive your success.  All the best!
- Chris

By Chris Meyer on 2012 06 19.

Thanks Duane!  It certainly can be confusing.

By pdrace on 2012 06 16.

Great article, Paul. Nice job of laying it all out!

By Duane Bolt on 2012 06 15.

What I was impressed by was the load demand against the LVL iJoists while working in a residential market. Ya’ll make good stuff.

By Max Stanford on 2012 06 12.

back to blog

“The 951” in Downtown Boise

Posted on February 19, 2016 by RedBuilt


The 951” is an all-wood, mixed-use structure in downtown Boise and is featured in Structure Magazine’s February 2016 issue. The 74,500 square feet building has four stories with the first floor designed for retail space and the upper floors contain 68 apartments.

As an all-wood structure, The 951 contains:

  • 230,300 board feet of dimensional lumber to frame the walls
  • 5800 sheets of OSB, including wall and roof sheathing, and floor decking
  • 31,200 lineal feet of Red-I™ I-joists, of various depths and series
  • 4650 ft3 of engineered wood products, including RedLam™ LVL, PSL and glulam

Thanks to the Wood Works Carbon Calculator, we were able to deduct the environmental impacts for the wood usage. See the following diagram to learn of the many benefits of wood construction.

The 951 carbon summary


Leave a Reply

Did you notice that on page 4 we are showing table fabrication at our Stayton, OR facility? If so, you have a good eye and you probably work at Stayton! But fabrication looks about the same in Delaware.

By Cornelia Sprung on 2015 04 27.

I am interested in finding out more about RedBuild open web floor joist for residential.

For the past 15 years we have desiign our floors for L480 (even with dimensioal lumber) We pour 10’ basement walls, use TJI’s and end up boxing around mechanicals and spendind to much time and money firestopping and drafrstopping for the new IRC and IBC. Were can I get more info on RedBiuld Open web Joist

By Rolling Rock Construction Co on 2014 07 03.

Not sure why but I found your closing line hilarious. Probably because it’s corny, however it’s probably true as well! Good to know everything went well in the process. Shoppers will definitely be happy Im sure!

By Angela - Chicago Garage Builders on 2013 10 10.

Fantastic win against Scotland. Absalotely great. I curled against your Dad. was a wonderful man. I grew up on the farm where Art and Aggie now live. We have retired to Athabasca an d winter in Mesa, Az. watch all the. Curling to keep cool. best wishes at the Olympics next year. continue success .  Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 03.

Thank you for your support Mr. Ruddick. Team USA and RedBuilt are very appreciative.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Thanks Henry,

I am from Perryvale, my Dad was Ernie Lehto. Would have been great if he could have been here to watch. One tough end against both Sweden and Canada yesterday, but we will bounce back today.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Congratulations on being part of the worlds curling. Are you from the lehto family and which one from perryvale . Very best of luck. We are curling fans and watch all the games. Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 01.

A dedicated redbuilt blog reader.. Thanks for the curling coverage. Congratulations Darren and go team USA.

By bill ruddick on 2013 03 31.

Here is Heinz Mueller’s response:

You are correct, Renaldo. This application would show up more in a commercial structure vs. a residential structure. For an application such as this, I would think a moisture sealant applied to the glulam material would help alleviate the potential issues. That being said, if you decided to go that route you would probably want to start weighing the cost/benefit ratio for using additional products/services (sealant & application) vs. using similar products (LVL, I-joist blocking, etc.) for the blocking/rim board in the floor/roof system. I hope that helps. Thank you for the question and for your interest in the RedBuilt blogs! Heinz

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Here is a great reply that was posted to RedBuilt’s Linked In page:

Renaldo Montenegro, I am going to assume that using Glulams for blocking is more suited for a commercial application rather than a residential application. Thus, the Glulams carrying a very large vertical load from above. In a residential use I would see this as an over kill. Yes, I agree on the moisture content of the Glulams shrinking. Would a moisture sealant applied on the Glulams’ work in this case? A very good article! Thanks for sharing.

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Great to to hear this!!!

By Renaldo Montenegro on 2012 10 17.

Epically informative.  I learned a lot.

By Greg Riley on 2012 10 12.

[...] Posted on October 10, 2012 by [...]

By Deeper is Cheaper | RedBuilt Blog | Michael T. Dai on 2012 10 10.

[...] Call your local representative for a no cost consultation.  Read part 1 here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? (Part 2) | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 18.

[...] Read Part 2 of this article here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 17.

Great article Tom.  Not to intrude, but I would like to expand on how the Redbuilt Design Centers can help the engineer of record.  When I say help, I really mean increase the EOR’s profits while specifying a safer structural roof/floor system.  As I think back to my time as a specifying engineer, specifying Redbuilt’s Open Web trusses saved me time (I can go on about the differences between Redbuilt’s Pin Connected Open Web trusses and plated trusses but that is for another time).  When an EOR saves time, they in essence increase profits.

How does Redbuilt save an EOR time (great question)?  We do all the gravity calculations and truss connections for every loading aspect of a roof/floor system.  All the EOR has to do is specify a truss depth, truss series, show all design loads required and maybe a connection detail or two (with or without the help of a Redbuilt technical representative).  Also, if the EOR requires a PE to stamp both the shop drawing and calculations, our internal designers and engineers will provide technical oversight and assurance that products are used as intended. 

Not only can we save an EOR time but we also provide some assurance and piece of mind.

By Guy Brousseau on 2012 08 23.

Interesting to read about what you are doing, Jason.

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 29.

Sorry for the late response.  I’m glad you have enjoyed the first two.  The third was posted this past week.  It was a fun experience.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 28.

I know that learning involves failure, so thank you for being humble enough to learn.
Thank you, too, for sharing.  I’m enjoying your journey.

By Kathy Bracisco on 2012 07 24.

There is more to come.  This story will continue over the next few weeks and the whole world will know whether I was right or not.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I don’t want to give anything away because this story will continue over the next few weeks.  It was definitely an educational and enjoyable experience that I’m glad to share.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I’m guessing that you accurately predicted the failure.  I’m not an engineer, but you certainly made this understandable enough to read at my level.  Best wishes as you go for Level II!!

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 12.

Very interesting! I’m sure you will be right on.

By Norm Watts on 2012 07 12.

Thanks for the differentation of RedBuilt products.  I forwarded to two customers who wanted to know more about RedForm I joists vs. the “look alikes.”

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 25.

It is great to be a part of the legacy.  Thank you for sharing some perspective on what you are seeing both large-scale in the economy, and how the RedBuilt/legacy Trus Joist business has weathered storms in the past.

By Jeff Jack on 2012 06 23.

I like the blog and appreciate the wisdom in your words.  The focus on thriving vs. surviving is an inspiring shift of perspective.  Not easy, but RedBuilt will thrive without a doubt.  If it were easy everyone would be doing it.  RedBuilt has created a toe hold and a beginning.  Carry on.

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 20.

Hey Kurt -
I enjoyed reading this post about the old Tj and dealing with the last great recession.  I still remember those “PBL” days, wondering as a new hire if I would walk into work one day and find out that I didn’t have a job.  Fortunately that never happened, and I enjoyed the heck out of working for a great company like Trus Joist.
You guys at RedBuilt have got the old Tj culture and believe me, that will help drive your success.  All the best!
- Chris

By Chris Meyer on 2012 06 19.

Thanks Duane!  It certainly can be confusing.

By pdrace on 2012 06 16.

Great article, Paul. Nice job of laying it all out!

By Duane Bolt on 2012 06 15.

What I was impressed by was the load demand against the LVL iJoists while working in a residential market. Ya’ll make good stuff.

By Max Stanford on 2012 06 12.

back to blog

White Paper: Strut Bracing

Posted on December 10, 2015 by RedBuilt


Next time you see bundles of what looks like truss webs delivered with your RedBuilt™ open-web trusses, make sure your contractor understands the purpose and installs them—strut bracing is there for their safety.

In 1975, installation bracing, or “strut bracing,” was created to ensure safe installation of our open-web trusses over impressive spans. Fast forward 40 years, and we continue to offer impressively-long spans, and still supply strut bracing for installation safety.

 

Learn more about what strut bracing is, any why RedBuilt provides it with every job, at no additional cost, in our most recent white paper: Strut Bracing by Ben Seely, P.E. and David Cortnik, EIT.


Leave a Reply

Did you notice that on page 4 we are showing table fabrication at our Stayton, OR facility? If so, you have a good eye and you probably work at Stayton! But fabrication looks about the same in Delaware.

By Cornelia Sprung on 2015 04 27.

I am interested in finding out more about RedBuild open web floor joist for residential.

For the past 15 years we have desiign our floors for L480 (even with dimensioal lumber) We pour 10’ basement walls, use TJI’s and end up boxing around mechanicals and spendind to much time and money firestopping and drafrstopping for the new IRC and IBC. Were can I get more info on RedBiuld Open web Joist

By Rolling Rock Construction Co on 2014 07 03.

Not sure why but I found your closing line hilarious. Probably because it’s corny, however it’s probably true as well! Good to know everything went well in the process. Shoppers will definitely be happy Im sure!

By Angela - Chicago Garage Builders on 2013 10 10.

Fantastic win against Scotland. Absalotely great. I curled against your Dad. was a wonderful man. I grew up on the farm where Art and Aggie now live. We have retired to Athabasca an d winter in Mesa, Az. watch all the. Curling to keep cool. best wishes at the Olympics next year. continue success .  Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 03.

Thank you for your support Mr. Ruddick. Team USA and RedBuilt are very appreciative.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Thanks Henry,

I am from Perryvale, my Dad was Ernie Lehto. Would have been great if he could have been here to watch. One tough end against both Sweden and Canada yesterday, but we will bounce back today.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Congratulations on being part of the worlds curling. Are you from the lehto family and which one from perryvale . Very best of luck. We are curling fans and watch all the games. Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 01.

A dedicated redbuilt blog reader.. Thanks for the curling coverage. Congratulations Darren and go team USA.

By bill ruddick on 2013 03 31.

Here is Heinz Mueller’s response:

You are correct, Renaldo. This application would show up more in a commercial structure vs. a residential structure. For an application such as this, I would think a moisture sealant applied to the glulam material would help alleviate the potential issues. That being said, if you decided to go that route you would probably want to start weighing the cost/benefit ratio for using additional products/services (sealant & application) vs. using similar products (LVL, I-joist blocking, etc.) for the blocking/rim board in the floor/roof system. I hope that helps. Thank you for the question and for your interest in the RedBuilt blogs! Heinz

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Here is a great reply that was posted to RedBuilt’s Linked In page:

Renaldo Montenegro, I am going to assume that using Glulams for blocking is more suited for a commercial application rather than a residential application. Thus, the Glulams carrying a very large vertical load from above. In a residential use I would see this as an over kill. Yes, I agree on the moisture content of the Glulams shrinking. Would a moisture sealant applied on the Glulams’ work in this case? A very good article! Thanks for sharing.

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Great to to hear this!!!

By Renaldo Montenegro on 2012 10 17.

Epically informative.  I learned a lot.

By Greg Riley on 2012 10 12.

[...] Posted on October 10, 2012 by [...]

By Deeper is Cheaper | RedBuilt Blog | Michael T. Dai on 2012 10 10.

[...] Call your local representative for a no cost consultation.  Read part 1 here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? (Part 2) | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 18.

[...] Read Part 2 of this article here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 17.

Great article Tom.  Not to intrude, but I would like to expand on how the Redbuilt Design Centers can help the engineer of record.  When I say help, I really mean increase the EOR’s profits while specifying a safer structural roof/floor system.  As I think back to my time as a specifying engineer, specifying Redbuilt’s Open Web trusses saved me time (I can go on about the differences between Redbuilt’s Pin Connected Open Web trusses and plated trusses but that is for another time).  When an EOR saves time, they in essence increase profits.

How does Redbuilt save an EOR time (great question)?  We do all the gravity calculations and truss connections for every loading aspect of a roof/floor system.  All the EOR has to do is specify a truss depth, truss series, show all design loads required and maybe a connection detail or two (with or without the help of a Redbuilt technical representative).  Also, if the EOR requires a PE to stamp both the shop drawing and calculations, our internal designers and engineers will provide technical oversight and assurance that products are used as intended. 

Not only can we save an EOR time but we also provide some assurance and piece of mind.

By Guy Brousseau on 2012 08 23.

Interesting to read about what you are doing, Jason.

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 29.

Sorry for the late response.  I’m glad you have enjoyed the first two.  The third was posted this past week.  It was a fun experience.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 28.

I know that learning involves failure, so thank you for being humble enough to learn.
Thank you, too, for sharing.  I’m enjoying your journey.

By Kathy Bracisco on 2012 07 24.

There is more to come.  This story will continue over the next few weeks and the whole world will know whether I was right or not.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I don’t want to give anything away because this story will continue over the next few weeks.  It was definitely an educational and enjoyable experience that I’m glad to share.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I’m guessing that you accurately predicted the failure.  I’m not an engineer, but you certainly made this understandable enough to read at my level.  Best wishes as you go for Level II!!

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 12.

Very interesting! I’m sure you will be right on.

By Norm Watts on 2012 07 12.

Thanks for the differentation of RedBuilt products.  I forwarded to two customers who wanted to know more about RedForm I joists vs. the “look alikes.”

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 25.

It is great to be a part of the legacy.  Thank you for sharing some perspective on what you are seeing both large-scale in the economy, and how the RedBuilt/legacy Trus Joist business has weathered storms in the past.

By Jeff Jack on 2012 06 23.

I like the blog and appreciate the wisdom in your words.  The focus on thriving vs. surviving is an inspiring shift of perspective.  Not easy, but RedBuilt will thrive without a doubt.  If it were easy everyone would be doing it.  RedBuilt has created a toe hold and a beginning.  Carry on.

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 20.

Hey Kurt -
I enjoyed reading this post about the old Tj and dealing with the last great recession.  I still remember those “PBL” days, wondering as a new hire if I would walk into work one day and find out that I didn’t have a job.  Fortunately that never happened, and I enjoyed the heck out of working for a great company like Trus Joist.
You guys at RedBuilt have got the old Tj culture and believe me, that will help drive your success.  All the best!
- Chris

By Chris Meyer on 2012 06 19.

Thanks Duane!  It certainly can be confusing.

By pdrace on 2012 06 16.

Great article, Paul. Nice job of laying it all out!

By Duane Bolt on 2012 06 15.

What I was impressed by was the load demand against the LVL iJoists while working in a residential market. Ya’ll make good stuff.

By Max Stanford on 2012 06 12.

back to blog

Scissor Trusses Offer Aesthetic Appeal

Posted on November 20, 2015 by RedBuilt


Main Street is a well-traveled, tree-lined street in Watertown, a community on the outskirts of Cambridge, Massachusetts. A corner that was previously a gas station is now an appealing one-story 4,500 square foot retail building.

“The building owner wanted to think outside the box and transform this site to help attract upscale tenants,” says architect Douglas Annino. “A RedBuilt scissor truss roof system – left exposed – was an aesthetically pleasing characteristic that fit the intent.”

After reviewing three product series with different on-center spacings, the architect was able to evaluate the budget and select the best option. “Our RedBuilt customer service was very good. We don’t get this kind of service from other manufacturers,” says Doug. “It makes a huge difference in my decisions when I can actually talk with someone about design options with up-to-date information on costs and availability.”

See the results of the Watertown retail building project and additional photos, and learn more about how we helped solve our customer's challenges on this project.


Leave a Reply

Did you notice that on page 4 we are showing table fabrication at our Stayton, OR facility? If so, you have a good eye and you probably work at Stayton! But fabrication looks about the same in Delaware.

By Cornelia Sprung on 2015 04 27.

I am interested in finding out more about RedBuild open web floor joist for residential.

For the past 15 years we have desiign our floors for L480 (even with dimensioal lumber) We pour 10’ basement walls, use TJI’s and end up boxing around mechanicals and spendind to much time and money firestopping and drafrstopping for the new IRC and IBC. Were can I get more info on RedBiuld Open web Joist

By Rolling Rock Construction Co on 2014 07 03.

Not sure why but I found your closing line hilarious. Probably because it’s corny, however it’s probably true as well! Good to know everything went well in the process. Shoppers will definitely be happy Im sure!

By Angela - Chicago Garage Builders on 2013 10 10.

Fantastic win against Scotland. Absalotely great. I curled against your Dad. was a wonderful man. I grew up on the farm where Art and Aggie now live. We have retired to Athabasca an d winter in Mesa, Az. watch all the. Curling to keep cool. best wishes at the Olympics next year. continue success .  Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 03.

Thank you for your support Mr. Ruddick. Team USA and RedBuilt are very appreciative.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Thanks Henry,

I am from Perryvale, my Dad was Ernie Lehto. Would have been great if he could have been here to watch. One tough end against both Sweden and Canada yesterday, but we will bounce back today.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Congratulations on being part of the worlds curling. Are you from the lehto family and which one from perryvale . Very best of luck. We are curling fans and watch all the games. Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 01.

A dedicated redbuilt blog reader.. Thanks for the curling coverage. Congratulations Darren and go team USA.

By bill ruddick on 2013 03 31.

Here is Heinz Mueller’s response:

You are correct, Renaldo. This application would show up more in a commercial structure vs. a residential structure. For an application such as this, I would think a moisture sealant applied to the glulam material would help alleviate the potential issues. That being said, if you decided to go that route you would probably want to start weighing the cost/benefit ratio for using additional products/services (sealant & application) vs. using similar products (LVL, I-joist blocking, etc.) for the blocking/rim board in the floor/roof system. I hope that helps. Thank you for the question and for your interest in the RedBuilt blogs! Heinz

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Here is a great reply that was posted to RedBuilt’s Linked In page:

Renaldo Montenegro, I am going to assume that using Glulams for blocking is more suited for a commercial application rather than a residential application. Thus, the Glulams carrying a very large vertical load from above. In a residential use I would see this as an over kill. Yes, I agree on the moisture content of the Glulams shrinking. Would a moisture sealant applied on the Glulams’ work in this case? A very good article! Thanks for sharing.

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Great to to hear this!!!

By Renaldo Montenegro on 2012 10 17.

Epically informative.  I learned a lot.

By Greg Riley on 2012 10 12.

[...] Posted on October 10, 2012 by [...]

By Deeper is Cheaper | RedBuilt Blog | Michael T. Dai on 2012 10 10.

[...] Call your local representative for a no cost consultation.  Read part 1 here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? (Part 2) | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 18.

[...] Read Part 2 of this article here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 17.

Great article Tom.  Not to intrude, but I would like to expand on how the Redbuilt Design Centers can help the engineer of record.  When I say help, I really mean increase the EOR’s profits while specifying a safer structural roof/floor system.  As I think back to my time as a specifying engineer, specifying Redbuilt’s Open Web trusses saved me time (I can go on about the differences between Redbuilt’s Pin Connected Open Web trusses and plated trusses but that is for another time).  When an EOR saves time, they in essence increase profits.

How does Redbuilt save an EOR time (great question)?  We do all the gravity calculations and truss connections for every loading aspect of a roof/floor system.  All the EOR has to do is specify a truss depth, truss series, show all design loads required and maybe a connection detail or two (with or without the help of a Redbuilt technical representative).  Also, if the EOR requires a PE to stamp both the shop drawing and calculations, our internal designers and engineers will provide technical oversight and assurance that products are used as intended. 

Not only can we save an EOR time but we also provide some assurance and piece of mind.

By Guy Brousseau on 2012 08 23.

Interesting to read about what you are doing, Jason.

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 29.

Sorry for the late response.  I’m glad you have enjoyed the first two.  The third was posted this past week.  It was a fun experience.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 28.

I know that learning involves failure, so thank you for being humble enough to learn.
Thank you, too, for sharing.  I’m enjoying your journey.

By Kathy Bracisco on 2012 07 24.

There is more to come.  This story will continue over the next few weeks and the whole world will know whether I was right or not.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I don’t want to give anything away because this story will continue over the next few weeks.  It was definitely an educational and enjoyable experience that I’m glad to share.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I’m guessing that you accurately predicted the failure.  I’m not an engineer, but you certainly made this understandable enough to read at my level.  Best wishes as you go for Level II!!

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 12.

Very interesting! I’m sure you will be right on.

By Norm Watts on 2012 07 12.

Thanks for the differentation of RedBuilt products.  I forwarded to two customers who wanted to know more about RedForm I joists vs. the “look alikes.”

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 25.

It is great to be a part of the legacy.  Thank you for sharing some perspective on what you are seeing both large-scale in the economy, and how the RedBuilt/legacy Trus Joist business has weathered storms in the past.

By Jeff Jack on 2012 06 23.

I like the blog and appreciate the wisdom in your words.  The focus on thriving vs. surviving is an inspiring shift of perspective.  Not easy, but RedBuilt will thrive without a doubt.  If it were easy everyone would be doing it.  RedBuilt has created a toe hold and a beginning.  Carry on.

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 20.

Hey Kurt -
I enjoyed reading this post about the old Tj and dealing with the last great recession.  I still remember those “PBL” days, wondering as a new hire if I would walk into work one day and find out that I didn’t have a job.  Fortunately that never happened, and I enjoyed the heck out of working for a great company like Trus Joist.
You guys at RedBuilt have got the old Tj culture and believe me, that will help drive your success.  All the best!
- Chris

By Chris Meyer on 2012 06 19.

Thanks Duane!  It certainly can be confusing.

By pdrace on 2012 06 16.

Great article, Paul. Nice job of laying it all out!

By Duane Bolt on 2012 06 15.

What I was impressed by was the load demand against the LVL iJoists while working in a residential market. Ya’ll make good stuff.

By Max Stanford on 2012 06 12.

back to blog

High Strength-to-Weight Ratio: Just What The Doctor Ordered

Posted on August 25, 2015 by RedBuilt


Sandpoint, Idaho is a mountain town of less than 10,000 people, on the shore of Lake Pend Oreille. Originally a logging town, it has become a tourist destination—and with population growth comes demand for medical services.

Bonner General Health needed to expand; thus a medical office building was built next door to the existing hospital. Construction of the new facility, however, had its own unplanned emergencies.

As beautiful as it may be, Sandpoint is on an alluvial floodplain of fine, glacial clay that sits in a seismic zone. Original designs called for heavy construction materials of steel and brick on the exterior. “We needed to trim weight from the building to minimize the cost penalty it would have had as a result of the seismic analysis,” says construction manager Jim Williamson.

“Our original plan was to build with steel,” says building owner Chris Meyer. “But the soil conditions presented a different set of circumstances.” A lighter solution was needed, but would a wood frame building be possible? “RedBuilt helped us find solutions at the right cost along with meeting the requirements of engineering,” Chris confirms.

The solution ultimately came from several angles: switching to Red-I™ joists with their impressive strength-to-weight ratio, adding soil stabilization features into the foundation design, and switching part of the building from brick to stucco and an exterior insulation finishing system.

“This is definitely the biggest wood frame building that I’ve ever done,” says Williamson. “Not only did wood give us a more economical structure, but we could more easily source our labor needs with wood framing, too.”

Beyond soil conditions, tenant use also constrained the design. As a medical center, the following considerations needed to be included:

  • High ceiling heights to allow for medical machine placement
  • Complex ventilation and plumbing requirements, including options for anticipated future needs
  • Maximized column spacing to allow for unobstructed rooms and large, flexible spaces
  • Minimal floor vibration
  • Connection by overhead walkway to the Bonner General Health regional hospital

“We needed room for all of that plumbing and mechanical in the floor space,” says Williamson. “The solution came from a careful layout and a collaborative effort between the engineer and the RedBuilt team. We did a lot of up-front value engineering to ensure our design was optimized.”

See the results of the Sandpoint Medical Building project and additional photos, and learn more about how we helped solve our customer's challenges on this project.


Leave a Reply

Did you notice that on page 4 we are showing table fabrication at our Stayton, OR facility? If so, you have a good eye and you probably work at Stayton! But fabrication looks about the same in Delaware.

By Cornelia Sprung on 2015 04 27.

I am interested in finding out more about RedBuild open web floor joist for residential.

For the past 15 years we have desiign our floors for L480 (even with dimensioal lumber) We pour 10’ basement walls, use TJI’s and end up boxing around mechanicals and spendind to much time and money firestopping and drafrstopping for the new IRC and IBC. Were can I get more info on RedBiuld Open web Joist

By Rolling Rock Construction Co on 2014 07 03.

Not sure why but I found your closing line hilarious. Probably because it’s corny, however it’s probably true as well! Good to know everything went well in the process. Shoppers will definitely be happy Im sure!

By Angela - Chicago Garage Builders on 2013 10 10.

Fantastic win against Scotland. Absalotely great. I curled against your Dad. was a wonderful man. I grew up on the farm where Art and Aggie now live. We have retired to Athabasca an d winter in Mesa, Az. watch all the. Curling to keep cool. best wishes at the Olympics next year. continue success .  Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 03.

Thank you for your support Mr. Ruddick. Team USA and RedBuilt are very appreciative.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Thanks Henry,

I am from Perryvale, my Dad was Ernie Lehto. Would have been great if he could have been here to watch. One tough end against both Sweden and Canada yesterday, but we will bounce back today.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Congratulations on being part of the worlds curling. Are you from the lehto family and which one from perryvale . Very best of luck. We are curling fans and watch all the games. Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 01.

A dedicated redbuilt blog reader.. Thanks for the curling coverage. Congratulations Darren and go team USA.

By bill ruddick on 2013 03 31.

Here is Heinz Mueller’s response:

You are correct, Renaldo. This application would show up more in a commercial structure vs. a residential structure. For an application such as this, I would think a moisture sealant applied to the glulam material would help alleviate the potential issues. That being said, if you decided to go that route you would probably want to start weighing the cost/benefit ratio for using additional products/services (sealant & application) vs. using similar products (LVL, I-joist blocking, etc.) for the blocking/rim board in the floor/roof system. I hope that helps. Thank you for the question and for your interest in the RedBuilt blogs! Heinz

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Here is a great reply that was posted to RedBuilt’s Linked In page:

Renaldo Montenegro, I am going to assume that using Glulams for blocking is more suited for a commercial application rather than a residential application. Thus, the Glulams carrying a very large vertical load from above. In a residential use I would see this as an over kill. Yes, I agree on the moisture content of the Glulams shrinking. Would a moisture sealant applied on the Glulams’ work in this case? A very good article! Thanks for sharing.

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Great to to hear this!!!

By Renaldo Montenegro on 2012 10 17.

Epically informative.  I learned a lot.

By Greg Riley on 2012 10 12.

[...] Posted on October 10, 2012 by [...]

By Deeper is Cheaper | RedBuilt Blog | Michael T. Dai on 2012 10 10.

[...] Call your local representative for a no cost consultation.  Read part 1 here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? (Part 2) | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 18.

[...] Read Part 2 of this article here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 17.

Great article Tom.  Not to intrude, but I would like to expand on how the Redbuilt Design Centers can help the engineer of record.  When I say help, I really mean increase the EOR’s profits while specifying a safer structural roof/floor system.  As I think back to my time as a specifying engineer, specifying Redbuilt’s Open Web trusses saved me time (I can go on about the differences between Redbuilt’s Pin Connected Open Web trusses and plated trusses but that is for another time).  When an EOR saves time, they in essence increase profits.

How does Redbuilt save an EOR time (great question)?  We do all the gravity calculations and truss connections for every loading aspect of a roof/floor system.  All the EOR has to do is specify a truss depth, truss series, show all design loads required and maybe a connection detail or two (with or without the help of a Redbuilt technical representative).  Also, if the EOR requires a PE to stamp both the shop drawing and calculations, our internal designers and engineers will provide technical oversight and assurance that products are used as intended. 

Not only can we save an EOR time but we also provide some assurance and piece of mind.

By Guy Brousseau on 2012 08 23.

Interesting to read about what you are doing, Jason.

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 29.

Sorry for the late response.  I’m glad you have enjoyed the first two.  The third was posted this past week.  It was a fun experience.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 28.

I know that learning involves failure, so thank you for being humble enough to learn.
Thank you, too, for sharing.  I’m enjoying your journey.

By Kathy Bracisco on 2012 07 24.

There is more to come.  This story will continue over the next few weeks and the whole world will know whether I was right or not.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I don’t want to give anything away because this story will continue over the next few weeks.  It was definitely an educational and enjoyable experience that I’m glad to share.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I’m guessing that you accurately predicted the failure.  I’m not an engineer, but you certainly made this understandable enough to read at my level.  Best wishes as you go for Level II!!

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 12.

Very interesting! I’m sure you will be right on.

By Norm Watts on 2012 07 12.

Thanks for the differentation of RedBuilt products.  I forwarded to two customers who wanted to know more about RedForm I joists vs. the “look alikes.”

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 25.

It is great to be a part of the legacy.  Thank you for sharing some perspective on what you are seeing both large-scale in the economy, and how the RedBuilt/legacy Trus Joist business has weathered storms in the past.

By Jeff Jack on 2012 06 23.

I like the blog and appreciate the wisdom in your words.  The focus on thriving vs. surviving is an inspiring shift of perspective.  Not easy, but RedBuilt will thrive without a doubt.  If it were easy everyone would be doing it.  RedBuilt has created a toe hold and a beginning.  Carry on.

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 20.

Hey Kurt -
I enjoyed reading this post about the old Tj and dealing with the last great recession.  I still remember those “PBL” days, wondering as a new hire if I would walk into work one day and find out that I didn’t have a job.  Fortunately that never happened, and I enjoyed the heck out of working for a great company like Trus Joist.
You guys at RedBuilt have got the old Tj culture and believe me, that will help drive your success.  All the best!
- Chris

By Chris Meyer on 2012 06 19.

Thanks Duane!  It certainly can be confusing.

By pdrace on 2012 06 16.

Great article, Paul. Nice job of laying it all out!

By Duane Bolt on 2012 06 15.

What I was impressed by was the load demand against the LVL iJoists while working in a residential market. Ya’ll make good stuff.

By Max Stanford on 2012 06 12.

back to blog

What’s the difference?  Pin vs. Plated Trusses

Posted on July 08, 2015 by RedBuilt


What's the difference?  Pin vs. Plated Trusses

As architects and engineers, our customers rely upon us to provide thoughtful, educated and substantiated recommendations for their structural design. We all have our specialties, yet we need to be experts on all design details – one of which is the roof trusses for light commercial construction.

Never fear, RedBuilt is here to help you better understand the differences in pin vs. metal-plated trusses. Check out the white paper “Pin vs Plated Trusses: The Devil is in the Details” by RedBuilt’s own Wilson Antoniuk to learn more about the differences in these two building options.

You can also catch Wilson at the SEA Northwest Conference in Boise, Idaho July 16-18. Look for the RedBuilt booth.


Leave a Reply

Did you notice that on page 4 we are showing table fabrication at our Stayton, OR facility? If so, you have a good eye and you probably work at Stayton! But fabrication looks about the same in Delaware.

By Cornelia Sprung on 2015 04 27.

I am interested in finding out more about RedBuild open web floor joist for residential.

For the past 15 years we have desiign our floors for L480 (even with dimensioal lumber) We pour 10’ basement walls, use TJI’s and end up boxing around mechanicals and spendind to much time and money firestopping and drafrstopping for the new IRC and IBC. Were can I get more info on RedBiuld Open web Joist

By Rolling Rock Construction Co on 2014 07 03.

Not sure why but I found your closing line hilarious. Probably because it’s corny, however it’s probably true as well! Good to know everything went well in the process. Shoppers will definitely be happy Im sure!

By Angela - Chicago Garage Builders on 2013 10 10.

Fantastic win against Scotland. Absalotely great. I curled against your Dad. was a wonderful man. I grew up on the farm where Art and Aggie now live. We have retired to Athabasca an d winter in Mesa, Az. watch all the. Curling to keep cool. best wishes at the Olympics next year. continue success .  Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 03.

Thank you for your support Mr. Ruddick. Team USA and RedBuilt are very appreciative.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Thanks Henry,

I am from Perryvale, my Dad was Ernie Lehto. Would have been great if he could have been here to watch. One tough end against both Sweden and Canada yesterday, but we will bounce back today.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Congratulations on being part of the worlds curling. Are you from the lehto family and which one from perryvale . Very best of luck. We are curling fans and watch all the games. Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 01.

A dedicated redbuilt blog reader.. Thanks for the curling coverage. Congratulations Darren and go team USA.

By bill ruddick on 2013 03 31.

Here is Heinz Mueller’s response:

You are correct, Renaldo. This application would show up more in a commercial structure vs. a residential structure. For an application such as this, I would think a moisture sealant applied to the glulam material would help alleviate the potential issues. That being said, if you decided to go that route you would probably want to start weighing the cost/benefit ratio for using additional products/services (sealant & application) vs. using similar products (LVL, I-joist blocking, etc.) for the blocking/rim board in the floor/roof system. I hope that helps. Thank you for the question and for your interest in the RedBuilt blogs! Heinz

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Here is a great reply that was posted to RedBuilt’s Linked In page:

Renaldo Montenegro, I am going to assume that using Glulams for blocking is more suited for a commercial application rather than a residential application. Thus, the Glulams carrying a very large vertical load from above. In a residential use I would see this as an over kill. Yes, I agree on the moisture content of the Glulams shrinking. Would a moisture sealant applied on the Glulams’ work in this case? A very good article! Thanks for sharing.

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Great to to hear this!!!

By Renaldo Montenegro on 2012 10 17.

Epically informative.  I learned a lot.

By Greg Riley on 2012 10 12.

[...] Posted on October 10, 2012 by [...]

By Deeper is Cheaper | RedBuilt Blog | Michael T. Dai on 2012 10 10.

[...] Call your local representative for a no cost consultation.  Read part 1 here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? (Part 2) | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 18.

[...] Read Part 2 of this article here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 17.

Great article Tom.  Not to intrude, but I would like to expand on how the Redbuilt Design Centers can help the engineer of record.  When I say help, I really mean increase the EOR’s profits while specifying a safer structural roof/floor system.  As I think back to my time as a specifying engineer, specifying Redbuilt’s Open Web trusses saved me time (I can go on about the differences between Redbuilt’s Pin Connected Open Web trusses and plated trusses but that is for another time).  When an EOR saves time, they in essence increase profits.

How does Redbuilt save an EOR time (great question)?  We do all the gravity calculations and truss connections for every loading aspect of a roof/floor system.  All the EOR has to do is specify a truss depth, truss series, show all design loads required and maybe a connection detail or two (with or without the help of a Redbuilt technical representative).  Also, if the EOR requires a PE to stamp both the shop drawing and calculations, our internal designers and engineers will provide technical oversight and assurance that products are used as intended. 

Not only can we save an EOR time but we also provide some assurance and piece of mind.

By Guy Brousseau on 2012 08 23.

Interesting to read about what you are doing, Jason.

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 29.

Sorry for the late response.  I’m glad you have enjoyed the first two.  The third was posted this past week.  It was a fun experience.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 28.

I know that learning involves failure, so thank you for being humble enough to learn.
Thank you, too, for sharing.  I’m enjoying your journey.

By Kathy Bracisco on 2012 07 24.

There is more to come.  This story will continue over the next few weeks and the whole world will know whether I was right or not.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I don’t want to give anything away because this story will continue over the next few weeks.  It was definitely an educational and enjoyable experience that I’m glad to share.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I’m guessing that you accurately predicted the failure.  I’m not an engineer, but you certainly made this understandable enough to read at my level.  Best wishes as you go for Level II!!

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 12.

Very interesting! I’m sure you will be right on.

By Norm Watts on 2012 07 12.

Thanks for the differentation of RedBuilt products.  I forwarded to two customers who wanted to know more about RedForm I joists vs. the “look alikes.”

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 25.

It is great to be a part of the legacy.  Thank you for sharing some perspective on what you are seeing both large-scale in the economy, and how the RedBuilt/legacy Trus Joist business has weathered storms in the past.

By Jeff Jack on 2012 06 23.

I like the blog and appreciate the wisdom in your words.  The focus on thriving vs. surviving is an inspiring shift of perspective.  Not easy, but RedBuilt will thrive without a doubt.  If it were easy everyone would be doing it.  RedBuilt has created a toe hold and a beginning.  Carry on.

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 20.

Hey Kurt -
I enjoyed reading this post about the old Tj and dealing with the last great recession.  I still remember those “PBL” days, wondering as a new hire if I would walk into work one day and find out that I didn’t have a job.  Fortunately that never happened, and I enjoyed the heck out of working for a great company like Trus Joist.
You guys at RedBuilt have got the old Tj culture and believe me, that will help drive your success.  All the best!
- Chris

By Chris Meyer on 2012 06 19.

Thanks Duane!  It certainly can be confusing.

By pdrace on 2012 06 16.

Great article, Paul. Nice job of laying it all out!

By Duane Bolt on 2012 06 15.

What I was impressed by was the load demand against the LVL iJoists while working in a residential market. Ya’ll make good stuff.

By Max Stanford on 2012 06 12.

back to blog

Walking the Talk: Safety and Quality

Posted on May 29, 2015 by RedBuilt


by Neil Prien


Shop drawings are easy to read while on the jobsite.

Safety and quality, two core values that established the company more than 50 years ago, still hold true with RedBuilt today. They sound good, yet how does RedBuilt really “walk the talk” when it comes to safety of its associates and the quality of our products?

Simply — through transparency and continuous improvement.

RedBuilt utilizes the ISO 9001 model for best operating practices in each of our four manufacturing plants. By following this model we’re able to have standardized practices that offers predictability, for both the safety of our associates and the quality of our products. RedBuilt receives third party audits and oversight, and yet we control and manage our own system.

Even with consistent practice, the quality management system is always being improved. With the diligence of the Continuous Improvement teams, RedBuilt refines and adjusts our well-tuned processes and procedures. Made up of associates from sales, engineering, and manufacturing – these cross-functional teams uncover opportunities for improvement throughout the organization.

One example of a continuous improvement success story is within one of the manufacturing plants. In the past, large trusses were moved by hand along and across roll cases by an undefined number of associates. This effort created an environment where an associate could injure themselves or others. A team, including the associates actually performing this task, developed a more automated method of transferring these trusses and defined the number of associates required to move them. The new process has greatly reduced the chance of injury to our associates and has been shared with all of our manufacturing plants for replication where applicable.

Another example is for shop drawings. With feedback from the installation reviews conducted by sales, we learned that installers were having difficulty reading shop drawings on the jobsite because the font was too small. By shedding light on this issue with the engineering group, they revised the shop drawing standards for all drawings to include a larger, more readable font.

Talking about safety and quality is easy. Doing it is different. These core values are demonstrated everyday by RedBuilt associates. Through a culture of transparency and our work on continuous improvement, we hold true to walking the talk.


Neil Prien is RedBuilt’s Manufacturing Technical Director and a member of the Continuous Improvement Team.


Leave a Reply

Did you notice that on page 4 we are showing table fabrication at our Stayton, OR facility? If so, you have a good eye and you probably work at Stayton! But fabrication looks about the same in Delaware.

By Cornelia Sprung on 2015 04 27.

I am interested in finding out more about RedBuild open web floor joist for residential.

For the past 15 years we have desiign our floors for L480 (even with dimensioal lumber) We pour 10’ basement walls, use TJI’s and end up boxing around mechanicals and spendind to much time and money firestopping and drafrstopping for the new IRC and IBC. Were can I get more info on RedBiuld Open web Joist

By Rolling Rock Construction Co on 2014 07 03.

Not sure why but I found your closing line hilarious. Probably because it’s corny, however it’s probably true as well! Good to know everything went well in the process. Shoppers will definitely be happy Im sure!

By Angela - Chicago Garage Builders on 2013 10 10.

Fantastic win against Scotland. Absalotely great. I curled against your Dad. was a wonderful man. I grew up on the farm where Art and Aggie now live. We have retired to Athabasca an d winter in Mesa, Az. watch all the. Curling to keep cool. best wishes at the Olympics next year. continue success .  Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 03.

Thank you for your support Mr. Ruddick. Team USA and RedBuilt are very appreciative.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Thanks Henry,

I am from Perryvale, my Dad was Ernie Lehto. Would have been great if he could have been here to watch. One tough end against both Sweden and Canada yesterday, but we will bounce back today.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Congratulations on being part of the worlds curling. Are you from the lehto family and which one from perryvale . Very best of luck. We are curling fans and watch all the games. Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 01.

A dedicated redbuilt blog reader.. Thanks for the curling coverage. Congratulations Darren and go team USA.

By bill ruddick on 2013 03 31.

Here is Heinz Mueller’s response:

You are correct, Renaldo. This application would show up more in a commercial structure vs. a residential structure. For an application such as this, I would think a moisture sealant applied to the glulam material would help alleviate the potential issues. That being said, if you decided to go that route you would probably want to start weighing the cost/benefit ratio for using additional products/services (sealant & application) vs. using similar products (LVL, I-joist blocking, etc.) for the blocking/rim board in the floor/roof system. I hope that helps. Thank you for the question and for your interest in the RedBuilt blogs! Heinz

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Here is a great reply that was posted to RedBuilt’s Linked In page:

Renaldo Montenegro, I am going to assume that using Glulams for blocking is more suited for a commercial application rather than a residential application. Thus, the Glulams carrying a very large vertical load from above. In a residential use I would see this as an over kill. Yes, I agree on the moisture content of the Glulams shrinking. Would a moisture sealant applied on the Glulams’ work in this case? A very good article! Thanks for sharing.

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Great to to hear this!!!

By Renaldo Montenegro on 2012 10 17.

Epically informative.  I learned a lot.

By Greg Riley on 2012 10 12.

[...] Posted on October 10, 2012 by [...]

By Deeper is Cheaper | RedBuilt Blog | Michael T. Dai on 2012 10 10.

[...] Call your local representative for a no cost consultation.  Read part 1 here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? (Part 2) | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 18.

[...] Read Part 2 of this article here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 17.

Great article Tom.  Not to intrude, but I would like to expand on how the Redbuilt Design Centers can help the engineer of record.  When I say help, I really mean increase the EOR’s profits while specifying a safer structural roof/floor system.  As I think back to my time as a specifying engineer, specifying Redbuilt’s Open Web trusses saved me time (I can go on about the differences between Redbuilt’s Pin Connected Open Web trusses and plated trusses but that is for another time).  When an EOR saves time, they in essence increase profits.

How does Redbuilt save an EOR time (great question)?  We do all the gravity calculations and truss connections for every loading aspect of a roof/floor system.  All the EOR has to do is specify a truss depth, truss series, show all design loads required and maybe a connection detail or two (with or without the help of a Redbuilt technical representative).  Also, if the EOR requires a PE to stamp both the shop drawing and calculations, our internal designers and engineers will provide technical oversight and assurance that products are used as intended. 

Not only can we save an EOR time but we also provide some assurance and piece of mind.

By Guy Brousseau on 2012 08 23.

Interesting to read about what you are doing, Jason.

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 29.

Sorry for the late response.  I’m glad you have enjoyed the first two.  The third was posted this past week.  It was a fun experience.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 28.

I know that learning involves failure, so thank you for being humble enough to learn.
Thank you, too, for sharing.  I’m enjoying your journey.

By Kathy Bracisco on 2012 07 24.

There is more to come.  This story will continue over the next few weeks and the whole world will know whether I was right or not.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I don’t want to give anything away because this story will continue over the next few weeks.  It was definitely an educational and enjoyable experience that I’m glad to share.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I’m guessing that you accurately predicted the failure.  I’m not an engineer, but you certainly made this understandable enough to read at my level.  Best wishes as you go for Level II!!

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 12.

Very interesting! I’m sure you will be right on.

By Norm Watts on 2012 07 12.

Thanks for the differentation of RedBuilt products.  I forwarded to two customers who wanted to know more about RedForm I joists vs. the “look alikes.”

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 25.

It is great to be a part of the legacy.  Thank you for sharing some perspective on what you are seeing both large-scale in the economy, and how the RedBuilt/legacy Trus Joist business has weathered storms in the past.

By Jeff Jack on 2012 06 23.

I like the blog and appreciate the wisdom in your words.  The focus on thriving vs. surviving is an inspiring shift of perspective.  Not easy, but RedBuilt will thrive without a doubt.  If it were easy everyone would be doing it.  RedBuilt has created a toe hold and a beginning.  Carry on.

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 20.

Hey Kurt -
I enjoyed reading this post about the old Tj and dealing with the last great recession.  I still remember those “PBL” days, wondering as a new hire if I would walk into work one day and find out that I didn’t have a job.  Fortunately that never happened, and I enjoyed the heck out of working for a great company like Trus Joist.
You guys at RedBuilt have got the old Tj culture and believe me, that will help drive your success.  All the best!
- Chris

By Chris Meyer on 2012 06 19.

Thanks Duane!  It certainly can be confusing.

By pdrace on 2012 06 16.

Great article, Paul. Nice job of laying it all out!

By Duane Bolt on 2012 06 15.

What I was impressed by was the load demand against the LVL iJoists while working in a residential market. Ya’ll make good stuff.

By Max Stanford on 2012 06 12.

back to blog

Look up RedBuilt at AIA Expo

Posted on May 04, 2015 by RedBuilt


 

RedBuilt is on the road to Atlanta for one of the largest and most exciting gatherings of architects and design professionals in the U.S., the AIA Convention 2015, May 14-16. To complement AIA’s new campaign to #lookup to see the contributions of architects in our everyday lives, we ask you to “Look Up RedBuilt” at booth #3981 at the Expo. All around your community you will see how Red-I™ joists, Open-web trusses and Red-Lam™ laminated veneer lumber are helping architects bring versatility, sustainability and architectural beauty to wood structures.

And don’t forget to participate in ExpoChat—a program that allows attendees to earn AIA Learning Units right at our booth. Take a few minutes at our booth to learn about design factors relating to floor performance, and green building points available for EWP, and you will earn LUs on the spot!

As a grand finale, “Like” the RedBuilt Facebook page and be entered to win a $100 pre-paid Visa gift card. The winner will be announced the week after the AIA Expo 2015 via Facebook. You need not attend the AIA Expo to win, so enter TODAY.


Leave a Reply

Did you notice that on page 4 we are showing table fabrication at our Stayton, OR facility? If so, you have a good eye and you probably work at Stayton! But fabrication looks about the same in Delaware.

By Cornelia Sprung on 2015 04 27.

I am interested in finding out more about RedBuild open web floor joist for residential.

For the past 15 years we have desiign our floors for L480 (even with dimensioal lumber) We pour 10’ basement walls, use TJI’s and end up boxing around mechanicals and spendind to much time and money firestopping and drafrstopping for the new IRC and IBC. Were can I get more info on RedBiuld Open web Joist

By Rolling Rock Construction Co on 2014 07 03.

Not sure why but I found your closing line hilarious. Probably because it’s corny, however it’s probably true as well! Good to know everything went well in the process. Shoppers will definitely be happy Im sure!

By Angela - Chicago Garage Builders on 2013 10 10.

Fantastic win against Scotland. Absalotely great. I curled against your Dad. was a wonderful man. I grew up on the farm where Art and Aggie now live. We have retired to Athabasca an d winter in Mesa, Az. watch all the. Curling to keep cool. best wishes at the Olympics next year. continue success .  Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 03.

Thank you for your support Mr. Ruddick. Team USA and RedBuilt are very appreciative.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Thanks Henry,

I am from Perryvale, my Dad was Ernie Lehto. Would have been great if he could have been here to watch. One tough end against both Sweden and Canada yesterday, but we will bounce back today.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Congratulations on being part of the worlds curling. Are you from the lehto family and which one from perryvale . Very best of luck. We are curling fans and watch all the games. Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 01.

A dedicated redbuilt blog reader.. Thanks for the curling coverage. Congratulations Darren and go team USA.

By bill ruddick on 2013 03 31.

Here is Heinz Mueller’s response:

You are correct, Renaldo. This application would show up more in a commercial structure vs. a residential structure. For an application such as this, I would think a moisture sealant applied to the glulam material would help alleviate the potential issues. That being said, if you decided to go that route you would probably want to start weighing the cost/benefit ratio for using additional products/services (sealant & application) vs. using similar products (LVL, I-joist blocking, etc.) for the blocking/rim board in the floor/roof system. I hope that helps. Thank you for the question and for your interest in the RedBuilt blogs! Heinz

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Here is a great reply that was posted to RedBuilt’s Linked In page:

Renaldo Montenegro, I am going to assume that using Glulams for blocking is more suited for a commercial application rather than a residential application. Thus, the Glulams carrying a very large vertical load from above. In a residential use I would see this as an over kill. Yes, I agree on the moisture content of the Glulams shrinking. Would a moisture sealant applied on the Glulams’ work in this case? A very good article! Thanks for sharing.

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Great to to hear this!!!

By Renaldo Montenegro on 2012 10 17.

Epically informative.  I learned a lot.

By Greg Riley on 2012 10 12.

[...] Posted on October 10, 2012 by [...]

By Deeper is Cheaper | RedBuilt Blog | Michael T. Dai on 2012 10 10.

[...] Call your local representative for a no cost consultation.  Read part 1 here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? (Part 2) | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 18.

[...] Read Part 2 of this article here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 17.

Great article Tom.  Not to intrude, but I would like to expand on how the Redbuilt Design Centers can help the engineer of record.  When I say help, I really mean increase the EOR’s profits while specifying a safer structural roof/floor system.  As I think back to my time as a specifying engineer, specifying Redbuilt’s Open Web trusses saved me time (I can go on about the differences between Redbuilt’s Pin Connected Open Web trusses and plated trusses but that is for another time).  When an EOR saves time, they in essence increase profits.

How does Redbuilt save an EOR time (great question)?  We do all the gravity calculations and truss connections for every loading aspect of a roof/floor system.  All the EOR has to do is specify a truss depth, truss series, show all design loads required and maybe a connection detail or two (with or without the help of a Redbuilt technical representative).  Also, if the EOR requires a PE to stamp both the shop drawing and calculations, our internal designers and engineers will provide technical oversight and assurance that products are used as intended. 

Not only can we save an EOR time but we also provide some assurance and piece of mind.

By Guy Brousseau on 2012 08 23.

Interesting to read about what you are doing, Jason.

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 29.

Sorry for the late response.  I’m glad you have enjoyed the first two.  The third was posted this past week.  It was a fun experience.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 28.

I know that learning involves failure, so thank you for being humble enough to learn.
Thank you, too, for sharing.  I’m enjoying your journey.

By Kathy Bracisco on 2012 07 24.

There is more to come.  This story will continue over the next few weeks and the whole world will know whether I was right or not.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I don’t want to give anything away because this story will continue over the next few weeks.  It was definitely an educational and enjoyable experience that I’m glad to share.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I’m guessing that you accurately predicted the failure.  I’m not an engineer, but you certainly made this understandable enough to read at my level.  Best wishes as you go for Level II!!

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 12.

Very interesting! I’m sure you will be right on.

By Norm Watts on 2012 07 12.

Thanks for the differentation of RedBuilt products.  I forwarded to two customers who wanted to know more about RedForm I joists vs. the “look alikes.”

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 25.

It is great to be a part of the legacy.  Thank you for sharing some perspective on what you are seeing both large-scale in the economy, and how the RedBuilt/legacy Trus Joist business has weathered storms in the past.

By Jeff Jack on 2012 06 23.

I like the blog and appreciate the wisdom in your words.  The focus on thriving vs. surviving is an inspiring shift of perspective.  Not easy, but RedBuilt will thrive without a doubt.  If it were easy everyone would be doing it.  RedBuilt has created a toe hold and a beginning.  Carry on.

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 20.

Hey Kurt -
I enjoyed reading this post about the old Tj and dealing with the last great recession.  I still remember those “PBL” days, wondering as a new hire if I would walk into work one day and find out that I didn’t have a job.  Fortunately that never happened, and I enjoyed the heck out of working for a great company like Trus Joist.
You guys at RedBuilt have got the old Tj culture and believe me, that will help drive your success.  All the best!
- Chris

By Chris Meyer on 2012 06 19.

Thanks Duane!  It certainly can be confusing.

By pdrace on 2012 06 16.

Great article, Paul. Nice job of laying it all out!

By Duane Bolt on 2012 06 15.

What I was impressed by was the load demand against the LVL iJoists while working in a residential market. Ya’ll make good stuff.

By Max Stanford on 2012 06 12.

back to blog

Understanding floor performance

Posted on April 29, 2015 by RedBuilt


There is a science to understanding floor performance. A little thing like vibration can cause major problems in structures and how occupants feel about a home, office building, church, school, doctor’s office or restaurant.

RedBuilt representative Dave Schubert and engineer Dwaine Charbonneau explain the variables to consider when designing for floor performance. From understanding vibration and how it occurs, to code requirements, the effects of joist spacing and depths, and subfloor materials, and how to hold a floor performance spec, Dave and Dwaine tell all. You’ll find the full-length white paper in our Articles library.


Leave a Reply

Did you notice that on page 4 we are showing table fabrication at our Stayton, OR facility? If so, you have a good eye and you probably work at Stayton! But fabrication looks about the same in Delaware.

By Cornelia Sprung on 2015 04 27.

I am interested in finding out more about RedBuild open web floor joist for residential.

For the past 15 years we have desiign our floors for L480 (even with dimensioal lumber) We pour 10’ basement walls, use TJI’s and end up boxing around mechanicals and spendind to much time and money firestopping and drafrstopping for the new IRC and IBC. Were can I get more info on RedBiuld Open web Joist

By Rolling Rock Construction Co on 2014 07 03.

Not sure why but I found your closing line hilarious. Probably because it’s corny, however it’s probably true as well! Good to know everything went well in the process. Shoppers will definitely be happy Im sure!

By Angela - Chicago Garage Builders on 2013 10 10.

Fantastic win against Scotland. Absalotely great. I curled against your Dad. was a wonderful man. I grew up on the farm where Art and Aggie now live. We have retired to Athabasca an d winter in Mesa, Az. watch all the. Curling to keep cool. best wishes at the Olympics next year. continue success .  Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 03.

Thank you for your support Mr. Ruddick. Team USA and RedBuilt are very appreciative.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Thanks Henry,

I am from Perryvale, my Dad was Ernie Lehto. Would have been great if he could have been here to watch. One tough end against both Sweden and Canada yesterday, but we will bounce back today.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Congratulations on being part of the worlds curling. Are you from the lehto family and which one from perryvale . Very best of luck. We are curling fans and watch all the games. Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 01.

A dedicated redbuilt blog reader.. Thanks for the curling coverage. Congratulations Darren and go team USA.

By bill ruddick on 2013 03 31.

Here is Heinz Mueller’s response:

You are correct, Renaldo. This application would show up more in a commercial structure vs. a residential structure. For an application such as this, I would think a moisture sealant applied to the glulam material would help alleviate the potential issues. That being said, if you decided to go that route you would probably want to start weighing the cost/benefit ratio for using additional products/services (sealant & application) vs. using similar products (LVL, I-joist blocking, etc.) for the blocking/rim board in the floor/roof system. I hope that helps. Thank you for the question and for your interest in the RedBuilt blogs! Heinz

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Here is a great reply that was posted to RedBuilt’s Linked In page:

Renaldo Montenegro, I am going to assume that using Glulams for blocking is more suited for a commercial application rather than a residential application. Thus, the Glulams carrying a very large vertical load from above. In a residential use I would see this as an over kill. Yes, I agree on the moisture content of the Glulams shrinking. Would a moisture sealant applied on the Glulams’ work in this case? A very good article! Thanks for sharing.

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Great to to hear this!!!

By Renaldo Montenegro on 2012 10 17.

Epically informative.  I learned a lot.

By Greg Riley on 2012 10 12.

[...] Posted on October 10, 2012 by [...]

By Deeper is Cheaper | RedBuilt Blog | Michael T. Dai on 2012 10 10.

[...] Call your local representative for a no cost consultation.  Read part 1 here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? (Part 2) | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 18.

[...] Read Part 2 of this article here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 17.

Great article Tom.  Not to intrude, but I would like to expand on how the Redbuilt Design Centers can help the engineer of record.  When I say help, I really mean increase the EOR’s profits while specifying a safer structural roof/floor system.  As I think back to my time as a specifying engineer, specifying Redbuilt’s Open Web trusses saved me time (I can go on about the differences between Redbuilt’s Pin Connected Open Web trusses and plated trusses but that is for another time).  When an EOR saves time, they in essence increase profits.

How does Redbuilt save an EOR time (great question)?  We do all the gravity calculations and truss connections for every loading aspect of a roof/floor system.  All the EOR has to do is specify a truss depth, truss series, show all design loads required and maybe a connection detail or two (with or without the help of a Redbuilt technical representative).  Also, if the EOR requires a PE to stamp both the shop drawing and calculations, our internal designers and engineers will provide technical oversight and assurance that products are used as intended. 

Not only can we save an EOR time but we also provide some assurance and piece of mind.

By Guy Brousseau on 2012 08 23.

Interesting to read about what you are doing, Jason.

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 29.

Sorry for the late response.  I’m glad you have enjoyed the first two.  The third was posted this past week.  It was a fun experience.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 28.

I know that learning involves failure, so thank you for being humble enough to learn.
Thank you, too, for sharing.  I’m enjoying your journey.

By Kathy Bracisco on 2012 07 24.

There is more to come.  This story will continue over the next few weeks and the whole world will know whether I was right or not.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I don’t want to give anything away because this story will continue over the next few weeks.  It was definitely an educational and enjoyable experience that I’m glad to share.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I’m guessing that you accurately predicted the failure.  I’m not an engineer, but you certainly made this understandable enough to read at my level.  Best wishes as you go for Level II!!

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 12.

Very interesting! I’m sure you will be right on.

By Norm Watts on 2012 07 12.

Thanks for the differentation of RedBuilt products.  I forwarded to two customers who wanted to know more about RedForm I joists vs. the “look alikes.”

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 25.

It is great to be a part of the legacy.  Thank you for sharing some perspective on what you are seeing both large-scale in the economy, and how the RedBuilt/legacy Trus Joist business has weathered storms in the past.

By Jeff Jack on 2012 06 23.

I like the blog and appreciate the wisdom in your words.  The focus on thriving vs. surviving is an inspiring shift of perspective.  Not easy, but RedBuilt will thrive without a doubt.  If it were easy everyone would be doing it.  RedBuilt has created a toe hold and a beginning.  Carry on.

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 20.

Hey Kurt -
I enjoyed reading this post about the old Tj and dealing with the last great recession.  I still remember those “PBL” days, wondering as a new hire if I would walk into work one day and find out that I didn’t have a job.  Fortunately that never happened, and I enjoyed the heck out of working for a great company like Trus Joist.
You guys at RedBuilt have got the old Tj culture and believe me, that will help drive your success.  All the best!
- Chris

By Chris Meyer on 2012 06 19.

Thanks Duane!  It certainly can be confusing.

By pdrace on 2012 06 16.

Great article, Paul. Nice job of laying it all out!

By Duane Bolt on 2012 06 15.

What I was impressed by was the load demand against the LVL iJoists while working in a residential market. Ya’ll make good stuff.

By Max Stanford on 2012 06 12.

back to blog

From lumber mill to flowerpot – the journey of lumber wrap

Posted on April 22, 2015 by RedBuilt


Because our trusses use a lot of MSR lumber, RedLam™ LVL or LSL, a lot of plastic lumber wrap is peeled off bundles as we get to work turning that material into RedBuilt trusses. At our Hillsboro, OR plant we bag up every bit of that wrap for recycling—adding up to about 5 tons per year! Once we have a big enough batch, our maintenance crew bales it for transport. These photos show Ryan and Murph operating the compactor to turn it into bales.

 

The bales are shipped to our Stayton, OR plant where they get added to bales of wrap gathered by that facility, and returned to the wrap manufacturer, where they meet up with even more bales of used wrap coming from companies all across the West. Eventually, those bales travel in large cargo containers to China where they are turned into flowerpots and other plastic consumer goods.


Leave a Reply

Did you notice that on page 4 we are showing table fabrication at our Stayton, OR facility? If so, you have a good eye and you probably work at Stayton! But fabrication looks about the same in Delaware.

By Cornelia Sprung on 2015 04 27.

I am interested in finding out more about RedBuild open web floor joist for residential.

For the past 15 years we have desiign our floors for L480 (even with dimensioal lumber) We pour 10’ basement walls, use TJI’s and end up boxing around mechanicals and spendind to much time and money firestopping and drafrstopping for the new IRC and IBC. Were can I get more info on RedBiuld Open web Joist

By Rolling Rock Construction Co on 2014 07 03.

Not sure why but I found your closing line hilarious. Probably because it’s corny, however it’s probably true as well! Good to know everything went well in the process. Shoppers will definitely be happy Im sure!

By Angela - Chicago Garage Builders on 2013 10 10.

Fantastic win against Scotland. Absalotely great. I curled against your Dad. was a wonderful man. I grew up on the farm where Art and Aggie now live. We have retired to Athabasca an d winter in Mesa, Az. watch all the. Curling to keep cool. best wishes at the Olympics next year. continue success .  Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 03.

Thank you for your support Mr. Ruddick. Team USA and RedBuilt are very appreciative.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Thanks Henry,

I am from Perryvale, my Dad was Ernie Lehto. Would have been great if he could have been here to watch. One tough end against both Sweden and Canada yesterday, but we will bounce back today.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Congratulations on being part of the worlds curling. Are you from the lehto family and which one from perryvale . Very best of luck. We are curling fans and watch all the games. Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 01.

A dedicated redbuilt blog reader.. Thanks for the curling coverage. Congratulations Darren and go team USA.

By bill ruddick on 2013 03 31.

Here is Heinz Mueller’s response:

You are correct, Renaldo. This application would show up more in a commercial structure vs. a residential structure. For an application such as this, I would think a moisture sealant applied to the glulam material would help alleviate the potential issues. That being said, if you decided to go that route you would probably want to start weighing the cost/benefit ratio for using additional products/services (sealant & application) vs. using similar products (LVL, I-joist blocking, etc.) for the blocking/rim board in the floor/roof system. I hope that helps. Thank you for the question and for your interest in the RedBuilt blogs! Heinz

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Here is a great reply that was posted to RedBuilt’s Linked In page:

Renaldo Montenegro, I am going to assume that using Glulams for blocking is more suited for a commercial application rather than a residential application. Thus, the Glulams carrying a very large vertical load from above. In a residential use I would see this as an over kill. Yes, I agree on the moisture content of the Glulams shrinking. Would a moisture sealant applied on the Glulams’ work in this case? A very good article! Thanks for sharing.

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Great to to hear this!!!

By Renaldo Montenegro on 2012 10 17.

Epically informative.  I learned a lot.

By Greg Riley on 2012 10 12.

[...] Posted on October 10, 2012 by [...]

By Deeper is Cheaper | RedBuilt Blog | Michael T. Dai on 2012 10 10.

[...] Call your local representative for a no cost consultation.  Read part 1 here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? (Part 2) | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 18.

[...] Read Part 2 of this article here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 17.

Great article Tom.  Not to intrude, but I would like to expand on how the Redbuilt Design Centers can help the engineer of record.  When I say help, I really mean increase the EOR’s profits while specifying a safer structural roof/floor system.  As I think back to my time as a specifying engineer, specifying Redbuilt’s Open Web trusses saved me time (I can go on about the differences between Redbuilt’s Pin Connected Open Web trusses and plated trusses but that is for another time).  When an EOR saves time, they in essence increase profits.

How does Redbuilt save an EOR time (great question)?  We do all the gravity calculations and truss connections for every loading aspect of a roof/floor system.  All the EOR has to do is specify a truss depth, truss series, show all design loads required and maybe a connection detail or two (with or without the help of a Redbuilt technical representative).  Also, if the EOR requires a PE to stamp both the shop drawing and calculations, our internal designers and engineers will provide technical oversight and assurance that products are used as intended. 

Not only can we save an EOR time but we also provide some assurance and piece of mind.

By Guy Brousseau on 2012 08 23.

Interesting to read about what you are doing, Jason.

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 29.

Sorry for the late response.  I’m glad you have enjoyed the first two.  The third was posted this past week.  It was a fun experience.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 28.

I know that learning involves failure, so thank you for being humble enough to learn.
Thank you, too, for sharing.  I’m enjoying your journey.

By Kathy Bracisco on 2012 07 24.

There is more to come.  This story will continue over the next few weeks and the whole world will know whether I was right or not.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I don’t want to give anything away because this story will continue over the next few weeks.  It was definitely an educational and enjoyable experience that I’m glad to share.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I’m guessing that you accurately predicted the failure.  I’m not an engineer, but you certainly made this understandable enough to read at my level.  Best wishes as you go for Level II!!

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 12.

Very interesting! I’m sure you will be right on.

By Norm Watts on 2012 07 12.

Thanks for the differentation of RedBuilt products.  I forwarded to two customers who wanted to know more about RedForm I joists vs. the “look alikes.”

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 25.

It is great to be a part of the legacy.  Thank you for sharing some perspective on what you are seeing both large-scale in the economy, and how the RedBuilt/legacy Trus Joist business has weathered storms in the past.

By Jeff Jack on 2012 06 23.

I like the blog and appreciate the wisdom in your words.  The focus on thriving vs. surviving is an inspiring shift of perspective.  Not easy, but RedBuilt will thrive without a doubt.  If it were easy everyone would be doing it.  RedBuilt has created a toe hold and a beginning.  Carry on.

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 20.

Hey Kurt -
I enjoyed reading this post about the old Tj and dealing with the last great recession.  I still remember those “PBL” days, wondering as a new hire if I would walk into work one day and find out that I didn’t have a job.  Fortunately that never happened, and I enjoyed the heck out of working for a great company like Trus Joist.
You guys at RedBuilt have got the old Tj culture and believe me, that will help drive your success.  All the best!
- Chris

By Chris Meyer on 2012 06 19.

Thanks Duane!  It certainly can be confusing.

By pdrace on 2012 06 16.

Great article, Paul. Nice job of laying it all out!

By Duane Bolt on 2012 06 15.

What I was impressed by was the load demand against the LVL iJoists while working in a residential market. Ya’ll make good stuff.

By Max Stanford on 2012 06 12.

back to blog

An Inside Look: Horseshoe Casino Construction

Posted on April 17, 2015 by RedBuilt


Take a tour of the construction of the Horseshoe Casino in Cincinnati, Ohio, and see everything that went into that project — from excavation, factory construction of forming tables at our Delaware, Ohio plant to delivery and concrete pouring.


Leave a Reply

Did you notice that on page 4 we are showing table fabrication at our Stayton, OR facility? If so, you have a good eye and you probably work at Stayton! But fabrication looks about the same in Delaware.

By Cornelia Sprung on 2015 04 27.

I am interested in finding out more about RedBuild open web floor joist for residential.

For the past 15 years we have desiign our floors for L480 (even with dimensioal lumber) We pour 10’ basement walls, use TJI’s and end up boxing around mechanicals and spendind to much time and money firestopping and drafrstopping for the new IRC and IBC. Were can I get more info on RedBiuld Open web Joist

By Rolling Rock Construction Co on 2014 07 03.

Not sure why but I found your closing line hilarious. Probably because it’s corny, however it’s probably true as well! Good to know everything went well in the process. Shoppers will definitely be happy Im sure!

By Angela - Chicago Garage Builders on 2013 10 10.

Fantastic win against Scotland. Absalotely great. I curled against your Dad. was a wonderful man. I grew up on the farm where Art and Aggie now live. We have retired to Athabasca an d winter in Mesa, Az. watch all the. Curling to keep cool. best wishes at the Olympics next year. continue success .  Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 03.

Thank you for your support Mr. Ruddick. Team USA and RedBuilt are very appreciative.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Thanks Henry,

I am from Perryvale, my Dad was Ernie Lehto. Would have been great if he could have been here to watch. One tough end against both Sweden and Canada yesterday, but we will bounce back today.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Congratulations on being part of the worlds curling. Are you from the lehto family and which one from perryvale . Very best of luck. We are curling fans and watch all the games. Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 01.

A dedicated redbuilt blog reader.. Thanks for the curling coverage. Congratulations Darren and go team USA.

By bill ruddick on 2013 03 31.

Here is Heinz Mueller’s response:

You are correct, Renaldo. This application would show up more in a commercial structure vs. a residential structure. For an application such as this, I would think a moisture sealant applied to the glulam material would help alleviate the potential issues. That being said, if you decided to go that route you would probably want to start weighing the cost/benefit ratio for using additional products/services (sealant & application) vs. using similar products (LVL, I-joist blocking, etc.) for the blocking/rim board in the floor/roof system. I hope that helps. Thank you for the question and for your interest in the RedBuilt blogs! Heinz

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Here is a great reply that was posted to RedBuilt’s Linked In page:

Renaldo Montenegro, I am going to assume that using Glulams for blocking is more suited for a commercial application rather than a residential application. Thus, the Glulams carrying a very large vertical load from above. In a residential use I would see this as an over kill. Yes, I agree on the moisture content of the Glulams shrinking. Would a moisture sealant applied on the Glulams’ work in this case? A very good article! Thanks for sharing.

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Great to to hear this!!!

By Renaldo Montenegro on 2012 10 17.

Epically informative.  I learned a lot.

By Greg Riley on 2012 10 12.

[...] Posted on October 10, 2012 by [...]

By Deeper is Cheaper | RedBuilt Blog | Michael T. Dai on 2012 10 10.

[...] Call your local representative for a no cost consultation.  Read part 1 here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? (Part 2) | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 18.

[...] Read Part 2 of this article here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 17.

Great article Tom.  Not to intrude, but I would like to expand on how the Redbuilt Design Centers can help the engineer of record.  When I say help, I really mean increase the EOR’s profits while specifying a safer structural roof/floor system.  As I think back to my time as a specifying engineer, specifying Redbuilt’s Open Web trusses saved me time (I can go on about the differences between Redbuilt’s Pin Connected Open Web trusses and plated trusses but that is for another time).  When an EOR saves time, they in essence increase profits.

How does Redbuilt save an EOR time (great question)?  We do all the gravity calculations and truss connections for every loading aspect of a roof/floor system.  All the EOR has to do is specify a truss depth, truss series, show all design loads required and maybe a connection detail or two (with or without the help of a Redbuilt technical representative).  Also, if the EOR requires a PE to stamp both the shop drawing and calculations, our internal designers and engineers will provide technical oversight and assurance that products are used as intended. 

Not only can we save an EOR time but we also provide some assurance and piece of mind.

By Guy Brousseau on 2012 08 23.

Interesting to read about what you are doing, Jason.

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 29.

Sorry for the late response.  I’m glad you have enjoyed the first two.  The third was posted this past week.  It was a fun experience.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 28.

I know that learning involves failure, so thank you for being humble enough to learn.
Thank you, too, for sharing.  I’m enjoying your journey.

By Kathy Bracisco on 2012 07 24.

There is more to come.  This story will continue over the next few weeks and the whole world will know whether I was right or not.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I don’t want to give anything away because this story will continue over the next few weeks.  It was definitely an educational and enjoyable experience that I’m glad to share.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I’m guessing that you accurately predicted the failure.  I’m not an engineer, but you certainly made this understandable enough to read at my level.  Best wishes as you go for Level II!!

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 12.

Very interesting! I’m sure you will be right on.

By Norm Watts on 2012 07 12.

Thanks for the differentation of RedBuilt products.  I forwarded to two customers who wanted to know more about RedForm I joists vs. the “look alikes.”

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 25.

It is great to be a part of the legacy.  Thank you for sharing some perspective on what you are seeing both large-scale in the economy, and how the RedBuilt/legacy Trus Joist business has weathered storms in the past.

By Jeff Jack on 2012 06 23.

I like the blog and appreciate the wisdom in your words.  The focus on thriving vs. surviving is an inspiring shift of perspective.  Not easy, but RedBuilt will thrive without a doubt.  If it were easy everyone would be doing it.  RedBuilt has created a toe hold and a beginning.  Carry on.

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 20.

Hey Kurt -
I enjoyed reading this post about the old Tj and dealing with the last great recession.  I still remember those “PBL” days, wondering as a new hire if I would walk into work one day and find out that I didn’t have a job.  Fortunately that never happened, and I enjoyed the heck out of working for a great company like Trus Joist.
You guys at RedBuilt have got the old Tj culture and believe me, that will help drive your success.  All the best!
- Chris

By Chris Meyer on 2012 06 19.

Thanks Duane!  It certainly can be confusing.

By pdrace on 2012 06 16.

Great article, Paul. Nice job of laying it all out!

By Duane Bolt on 2012 06 15.

What I was impressed by was the load demand against the LVL iJoists while working in a residential market. Ya’ll make good stuff.

By Max Stanford on 2012 06 12.

back to blog

Jobsite Review – One of the many things that make RedBuilt different

Posted on April 03, 2015 by RedBuilt


It’s a good day when our RedBuilt Technical Representatives—or Tech Reps, for short—work with a customer to find them a solution and then place an order for products to be manufactured. The story could end there, but for RedBuilt Tech Reps, there is more to do.


Technical Representative John Diehl is in the field and on a jobsite providing a RedBuilt product installation review.

Once products are manufactured, delivered to the site, and installed, a formal Jobsite Review is conducted by a Tech Rep to assure proper product installation, whether it be open-web trusses, Red-I™ joists or RedLam™ LVL. What started several years ago in the National Accounts team with paper and pen is now a company-wide automated process.

A jobsite review provides customers with the added
value of:

  • Identifying issues before closing in the building
  • Confirming that RedBuilt™ products were installed correctly—and if not, alerting our engineering department or the Engineer of Record that design solutions are needed to rectify the problem
  • Providing technical review with a person actually walking through the structure

Tech Reps check to ensure that framers have installed the product per both RedBuilt shop drawings and structural drawings. Timing of the review is critical as it evaluates that holes are within limits, lengths are spot on, and adequate bearings are being used along with proper hangers. Photos are taken if problems are found so design solutions can be created to remedy the situation. The process is also smart phone- or tablet-enabled making it dynamic and versatile.

Our review also garners feedback from framers to learn of any improvements that RedBuilt can make. In 2014, the average rating received from framers was 4.7 out of 5—a testament to our excellent service in the field.

RedBuilt’s goal is to have 90% of its projects receive a Jobsite Review. The National Accounts team routinely sends the review forms on to the restaurant brand and retail partners as part of our due diligence. Furthermore, the Jobsite Review documentation becomes part of the product warranty that lasts for the life of the structure.

Jobsite Reviews are one part of the RedBuilt service offering. They provide our customers with the added value of product application assurance after installation—just one of the things that makes RedBuilt different.

Watch for a sequel to this story that will discuss the internal process improvements that RedBuilt learns from Jobsite Review data to improve our customer experience.


Leave a Reply

Did you notice that on page 4 we are showing table fabrication at our Stayton, OR facility? If so, you have a good eye and you probably work at Stayton! But fabrication looks about the same in Delaware.

By Cornelia Sprung on 2015 04 27.

I am interested in finding out more about RedBuild open web floor joist for residential.

For the past 15 years we have desiign our floors for L480 (even with dimensioal lumber) We pour 10’ basement walls, use TJI’s and end up boxing around mechanicals and spendind to much time and money firestopping and drafrstopping for the new IRC and IBC. Were can I get more info on RedBiuld Open web Joist

By Rolling Rock Construction Co on 2014 07 03.

Not sure why but I found your closing line hilarious. Probably because it’s corny, however it’s probably true as well! Good to know everything went well in the process. Shoppers will definitely be happy Im sure!

By Angela - Chicago Garage Builders on 2013 10 10.

Fantastic win against Scotland. Absalotely great. I curled against your Dad. was a wonderful man. I grew up on the farm where Art and Aggie now live. We have retired to Athabasca an d winter in Mesa, Az. watch all the. Curling to keep cool. best wishes at the Olympics next year. continue success .  Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 03.

Thank you for your support Mr. Ruddick. Team USA and RedBuilt are very appreciative.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Thanks Henry,

I am from Perryvale, my Dad was Ernie Lehto. Would have been great if he could have been here to watch. One tough end against both Sweden and Canada yesterday, but we will bounce back today.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Congratulations on being part of the worlds curling. Are you from the lehto family and which one from perryvale . Very best of luck. We are curling fans and watch all the games. Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 01.

A dedicated redbuilt blog reader.. Thanks for the curling coverage. Congratulations Darren and go team USA.

By bill ruddick on 2013 03 31.

Here is Heinz Mueller’s response:

You are correct, Renaldo. This application would show up more in a commercial structure vs. a residential structure. For an application such as this, I would think a moisture sealant applied to the glulam material would help alleviate the potential issues. That being said, if you decided to go that route you would probably want to start weighing the cost/benefit ratio for using additional products/services (sealant & application) vs. using similar products (LVL, I-joist blocking, etc.) for the blocking/rim board in the floor/roof system. I hope that helps. Thank you for the question and for your interest in the RedBuilt blogs! Heinz

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Here is a great reply that was posted to RedBuilt’s Linked In page:

Renaldo Montenegro, I am going to assume that using Glulams for blocking is more suited for a commercial application rather than a residential application. Thus, the Glulams carrying a very large vertical load from above. In a residential use I would see this as an over kill. Yes, I agree on the moisture content of the Glulams shrinking. Would a moisture sealant applied on the Glulams’ work in this case? A very good article! Thanks for sharing.

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Great to to hear this!!!

By Renaldo Montenegro on 2012 10 17.

Epically informative.  I learned a lot.

By Greg Riley on 2012 10 12.

[...] Posted on October 10, 2012 by [...]

By Deeper is Cheaper | RedBuilt Blog | Michael T. Dai on 2012 10 10.

[...] Call your local representative for a no cost consultation.  Read part 1 here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? (Part 2) | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 18.

[...] Read Part 2 of this article here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 17.

Great article Tom.  Not to intrude, but I would like to expand on how the Redbuilt Design Centers can help the engineer of record.  When I say help, I really mean increase the EOR’s profits while specifying a safer structural roof/floor system.  As I think back to my time as a specifying engineer, specifying Redbuilt’s Open Web trusses saved me time (I can go on about the differences between Redbuilt’s Pin Connected Open Web trusses and plated trusses but that is for another time).  When an EOR saves time, they in essence increase profits.

How does Redbuilt save an EOR time (great question)?  We do all the gravity calculations and truss connections for every loading aspect of a roof/floor system.  All the EOR has to do is specify a truss depth, truss series, show all design loads required and maybe a connection detail or two (with or without the help of a Redbuilt technical representative).  Also, if the EOR requires a PE to stamp both the shop drawing and calculations, our internal designers and engineers will provide technical oversight and assurance that products are used as intended. 

Not only can we save an EOR time but we also provide some assurance and piece of mind.

By Guy Brousseau on 2012 08 23.

Interesting to read about what you are doing, Jason.

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 29.

Sorry for the late response.  I’m glad you have enjoyed the first two.  The third was posted this past week.  It was a fun experience.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 28.

I know that learning involves failure, so thank you for being humble enough to learn.
Thank you, too, for sharing.  I’m enjoying your journey.

By Kathy Bracisco on 2012 07 24.

There is more to come.  This story will continue over the next few weeks and the whole world will know whether I was right or not.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I don’t want to give anything away because this story will continue over the next few weeks.  It was definitely an educational and enjoyable experience that I’m glad to share.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I’m guessing that you accurately predicted the failure.  I’m not an engineer, but you certainly made this understandable enough to read at my level.  Best wishes as you go for Level II!!

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 12.

Very interesting! I’m sure you will be right on.

By Norm Watts on 2012 07 12.

Thanks for the differentation of RedBuilt products.  I forwarded to two customers who wanted to know more about RedForm I joists vs. the “look alikes.”

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 25.

It is great to be a part of the legacy.  Thank you for sharing some perspective on what you are seeing both large-scale in the economy, and how the RedBuilt/legacy Trus Joist business has weathered storms in the past.

By Jeff Jack on 2012 06 23.

I like the blog and appreciate the wisdom in your words.  The focus on thriving vs. surviving is an inspiring shift of perspective.  Not easy, but RedBuilt will thrive without a doubt.  If it were easy everyone would be doing it.  RedBuilt has created a toe hold and a beginning.  Carry on.

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 20.

Hey Kurt -
I enjoyed reading this post about the old Tj and dealing with the last great recession.  I still remember those “PBL” days, wondering as a new hire if I would walk into work one day and find out that I didn’t have a job.  Fortunately that never happened, and I enjoyed the heck out of working for a great company like Trus Joist.
You guys at RedBuilt have got the old Tj culture and believe me, that will help drive your success.  All the best!
- Chris

By Chris Meyer on 2012 06 19.

Thanks Duane!  It certainly can be confusing.

By pdrace on 2012 06 16.

Great article, Paul. Nice job of laying it all out!

By Duane Bolt on 2012 06 15.

What I was impressed by was the load demand against the LVL iJoists while working in a residential market. Ya’ll make good stuff.

By Max Stanford on 2012 06 12.

back to blog

We’ve Overhauled our Formwork Literature

Posted on March 23, 2015 by RedBuilt


Over the last couple of years, the American Concrete Institute Committee for Concrete Formwork (ACI-347) has been busy! They have issued the first edition of the Guide to Formed Concrete Surfaces (ACI-347.3R-13). They have revised the Guide to Formwork for Concrete (ACI-347R-14). And they have updated SP-4: Formwork for Concrete (8th Edition)—a substantial overhaul on the SP-4 book.

Key revisions to SP-4 include:

  • Update to all load tables
  • Recommendations for load durations and deflection criteria
  • Updates on newer formwork materials and processes (systems, engineered wood products, overlays, etc.)
  • LRFD design information
  • More information for lateral force design
  • Recommendations for design with newer concrete mixes (SCC)
  • Inclusion of ACI 347-14
  • Color photos and design examples of architectural concrete and surface finishes

All of these documents are available for sale through the ACI Store. In response to this evolving information now available to the forming industry, RedBuilt has conducted a major overhaul on our literature for formwork and shoring applications. The new RedBuilt Forming and Shoring Product Selector has been completely reorganized to simplify its use in the field, and additional tables have been added to consider additional deflection criteria and load duration assumptions in the newest edition of SP-4.

Download the new RedBuilt Forming and Shoring Product Selector here.


Leave a Reply

Did you notice that on page 4 we are showing table fabrication at our Stayton, OR facility? If so, you have a good eye and you probably work at Stayton! But fabrication looks about the same in Delaware.

By Cornelia Sprung on 2015 04 27.

I am interested in finding out more about RedBuild open web floor joist for residential.

For the past 15 years we have desiign our floors for L480 (even with dimensioal lumber) We pour 10’ basement walls, use TJI’s and end up boxing around mechanicals and spendind to much time and money firestopping and drafrstopping for the new IRC and IBC. Were can I get more info on RedBiuld Open web Joist

By Rolling Rock Construction Co on 2014 07 03.

Not sure why but I found your closing line hilarious. Probably because it’s corny, however it’s probably true as well! Good to know everything went well in the process. Shoppers will definitely be happy Im sure!

By Angela - Chicago Garage Builders on 2013 10 10.

Fantastic win against Scotland. Absalotely great. I curled against your Dad. was a wonderful man. I grew up on the farm where Art and Aggie now live. We have retired to Athabasca an d winter in Mesa, Az. watch all the. Curling to keep cool. best wishes at the Olympics next year. continue success .  Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 03.

Thank you for your support Mr. Ruddick. Team USA and RedBuilt are very appreciative.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Thanks Henry,

I am from Perryvale, my Dad was Ernie Lehto. Would have been great if he could have been here to watch. One tough end against both Sweden and Canada yesterday, but we will bounce back today.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Congratulations on being part of the worlds curling. Are you from the lehto family and which one from perryvale . Very best of luck. We are curling fans and watch all the games. Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 01.

A dedicated redbuilt blog reader.. Thanks for the curling coverage. Congratulations Darren and go team USA.

By bill ruddick on 2013 03 31.

Here is Heinz Mueller’s response:

You are correct, Renaldo. This application would show up more in a commercial structure vs. a residential structure. For an application such as this, I would think a moisture sealant applied to the glulam material would help alleviate the potential issues. That being said, if you decided to go that route you would probably want to start weighing the cost/benefit ratio for using additional products/services (sealant & application) vs. using similar products (LVL, I-joist blocking, etc.) for the blocking/rim board in the floor/roof system. I hope that helps. Thank you for the question and for your interest in the RedBuilt blogs! Heinz

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Here is a great reply that was posted to RedBuilt’s Linked In page:

Renaldo Montenegro, I am going to assume that using Glulams for blocking is more suited for a commercial application rather than a residential application. Thus, the Glulams carrying a very large vertical load from above. In a residential use I would see this as an over kill. Yes, I agree on the moisture content of the Glulams shrinking. Would a moisture sealant applied on the Glulams’ work in this case? A very good article! Thanks for sharing.

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Great to to hear this!!!

By Renaldo Montenegro on 2012 10 17.

Epically informative.  I learned a lot.

By Greg Riley on 2012 10 12.

[...] Posted on October 10, 2012 by [...]

By Deeper is Cheaper | RedBuilt Blog | Michael T. Dai on 2012 10 10.

[...] Call your local representative for a no cost consultation.  Read part 1 here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? (Part 2) | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 18.

[...] Read Part 2 of this article here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 17.

Great article Tom.  Not to intrude, but I would like to expand on how the Redbuilt Design Centers can help the engineer of record.  When I say help, I really mean increase the EOR’s profits while specifying a safer structural roof/floor system.  As I think back to my time as a specifying engineer, specifying Redbuilt’s Open Web trusses saved me time (I can go on about the differences between Redbuilt’s Pin Connected Open Web trusses and plated trusses but that is for another time).  When an EOR saves time, they in essence increase profits.

How does Redbuilt save an EOR time (great question)?  We do all the gravity calculations and truss connections for every loading aspect of a roof/floor system.  All the EOR has to do is specify a truss depth, truss series, show all design loads required and maybe a connection detail or two (with or without the help of a Redbuilt technical representative).  Also, if the EOR requires a PE to stamp both the shop drawing and calculations, our internal designers and engineers will provide technical oversight and assurance that products are used as intended. 

Not only can we save an EOR time but we also provide some assurance and piece of mind.

By Guy Brousseau on 2012 08 23.

Interesting to read about what you are doing, Jason.

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 29.

Sorry for the late response.  I’m glad you have enjoyed the first two.  The third was posted this past week.  It was a fun experience.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 28.

I know that learning involves failure, so thank you for being humble enough to learn.
Thank you, too, for sharing.  I’m enjoying your journey.

By Kathy Bracisco on 2012 07 24.

There is more to come.  This story will continue over the next few weeks and the whole world will know whether I was right or not.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I don’t want to give anything away because this story will continue over the next few weeks.  It was definitely an educational and enjoyable experience that I’m glad to share.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I’m guessing that you accurately predicted the failure.  I’m not an engineer, but you certainly made this understandable enough to read at my level.  Best wishes as you go for Level II!!

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 12.

Very interesting! I’m sure you will be right on.

By Norm Watts on 2012 07 12.

Thanks for the differentation of RedBuilt products.  I forwarded to two customers who wanted to know more about RedForm I joists vs. the “look alikes.”

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 25.

It is great to be a part of the legacy.  Thank you for sharing some perspective on what you are seeing both large-scale in the economy, and how the RedBuilt/legacy Trus Joist business has weathered storms in the past.

By Jeff Jack on 2012 06 23.

I like the blog and appreciate the wisdom in your words.  The focus on thriving vs. surviving is an inspiring shift of perspective.  Not easy, but RedBuilt will thrive without a doubt.  If it were easy everyone would be doing it.  RedBuilt has created a toe hold and a beginning.  Carry on.

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 20.

Hey Kurt -
I enjoyed reading this post about the old Tj and dealing with the last great recession.  I still remember those “PBL” days, wondering as a new hire if I would walk into work one day and find out that I didn’t have a job.  Fortunately that never happened, and I enjoyed the heck out of working for a great company like Trus Joist.
You guys at RedBuilt have got the old Tj culture and believe me, that will help drive your success.  All the best!
- Chris

By Chris Meyer on 2012 06 19.

Thanks Duane!  It certainly can be confusing.

By pdrace on 2012 06 16.

Great article, Paul. Nice job of laying it all out!

By Duane Bolt on 2012 06 15.

What I was impressed by was the load demand against the LVL iJoists while working in a residential market. Ya’ll make good stuff.

By Max Stanford on 2012 06 12.

back to blog

Rock Stars!—But just for a week

Posted on February 25, 2015 by RedBuilt


Guy Brousseau, PE

Engineers catch a lot of grief. We take things apart just to see how they work. We have a “knack” for asking lots of obscure questions. Engineers typically arrive early for meetings but don’t want to mingle with the other early people. Oh, and people make fun of us for our huge calculators.

Yet, this week is National Engineers Week, which is dedicated to recognizing how engineers make a difference in our world. That’s right, this week engineers are the rock stars.

As a leader in the engineered wood products industry, RedBuilt is proud of our engineers and their impact to the building industry. We are innovators that seek opportunities for continuous improvement. For an organization that is 315 associates strong, RedBuilt has:

  • 20 Professional Engineers
  • 1,194 total number of complete shop drawings produced under the guidance of RedBuilt engineers in 2014
  • Multiple professional licensures covering 49 states and 8 Canadian provinces
  • 300 hours of continuous education completed each year by the previously said 20 PE’s

So while National Engineering Week carries on, our RedBuilt engineers – or rather rock stars – have our heads down. We’re working our next innovative solution.

Guy has engineering seals/stamps for every state or province where he has a professional certification. Because he has so many, they need their own alphabetical categorization!


Leave a Reply

Did you notice that on page 4 we are showing table fabrication at our Stayton, OR facility? If so, you have a good eye and you probably work at Stayton! But fabrication looks about the same in Delaware.

By Cornelia Sprung on 2015 04 27.

I am interested in finding out more about RedBuild open web floor joist for residential.

For the past 15 years we have desiign our floors for L480 (even with dimensioal lumber) We pour 10’ basement walls, use TJI’s and end up boxing around mechanicals and spendind to much time and money firestopping and drafrstopping for the new IRC and IBC. Were can I get more info on RedBiuld Open web Joist

By Rolling Rock Construction Co on 2014 07 03.

Not sure why but I found your closing line hilarious. Probably because it’s corny, however it’s probably true as well! Good to know everything went well in the process. Shoppers will definitely be happy Im sure!

By Angela - Chicago Garage Builders on 2013 10 10.

Fantastic win against Scotland. Absalotely great. I curled against your Dad. was a wonderful man. I grew up on the farm where Art and Aggie now live. We have retired to Athabasca an d winter in Mesa, Az. watch all the. Curling to keep cool. best wishes at the Olympics next year. continue success .  Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 03.

Thank you for your support Mr. Ruddick. Team USA and RedBuilt are very appreciative.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Thanks Henry,

I am from Perryvale, my Dad was Ernie Lehto. Would have been great if he could have been here to watch. One tough end against both Sweden and Canada yesterday, but we will bounce back today.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Congratulations on being part of the worlds curling. Are you from the lehto family and which one from perryvale . Very best of luck. We are curling fans and watch all the games. Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 01.

A dedicated redbuilt blog reader.. Thanks for the curling coverage. Congratulations Darren and go team USA.

By bill ruddick on 2013 03 31.

Here is Heinz Mueller’s response:

You are correct, Renaldo. This application would show up more in a commercial structure vs. a residential structure. For an application such as this, I would think a moisture sealant applied to the glulam material would help alleviate the potential issues. That being said, if you decided to go that route you would probably want to start weighing the cost/benefit ratio for using additional products/services (sealant & application) vs. using similar products (LVL, I-joist blocking, etc.) for the blocking/rim board in the floor/roof system. I hope that helps. Thank you for the question and for your interest in the RedBuilt blogs! Heinz

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Here is a great reply that was posted to RedBuilt’s Linked In page:

Renaldo Montenegro, I am going to assume that using Glulams for blocking is more suited for a commercial application rather than a residential application. Thus, the Glulams carrying a very large vertical load from above. In a residential use I would see this as an over kill. Yes, I agree on the moisture content of the Glulams shrinking. Would a moisture sealant applied on the Glulams’ work in this case? A very good article! Thanks for sharing.

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Great to to hear this!!!

By Renaldo Montenegro on 2012 10 17.

Epically informative.  I learned a lot.

By Greg Riley on 2012 10 12.

[...] Posted on October 10, 2012 by [...]

By Deeper is Cheaper | RedBuilt Blog | Michael T. Dai on 2012 10 10.

[...] Call your local representative for a no cost consultation.  Read part 1 here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? (Part 2) | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 18.

[...] Read Part 2 of this article here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 17.

Great article Tom.  Not to intrude, but I would like to expand on how the Redbuilt Design Centers can help the engineer of record.  When I say help, I really mean increase the EOR’s profits while specifying a safer structural roof/floor system.  As I think back to my time as a specifying engineer, specifying Redbuilt’s Open Web trusses saved me time (I can go on about the differences between Redbuilt’s Pin Connected Open Web trusses and plated trusses but that is for another time).  When an EOR saves time, they in essence increase profits.

How does Redbuilt save an EOR time (great question)?  We do all the gravity calculations and truss connections for every loading aspect of a roof/floor system.  All the EOR has to do is specify a truss depth, truss series, show all design loads required and maybe a connection detail or two (with or without the help of a Redbuilt technical representative).  Also, if the EOR requires a PE to stamp both the shop drawing and calculations, our internal designers and engineers will provide technical oversight and assurance that products are used as intended. 

Not only can we save an EOR time but we also provide some assurance and piece of mind.

By Guy Brousseau on 2012 08 23.

Interesting to read about what you are doing, Jason.

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 29.

Sorry for the late response.  I’m glad you have enjoyed the first two.  The third was posted this past week.  It was a fun experience.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 28.

I know that learning involves failure, so thank you for being humble enough to learn.
Thank you, too, for sharing.  I’m enjoying your journey.

By Kathy Bracisco on 2012 07 24.

There is more to come.  This story will continue over the next few weeks and the whole world will know whether I was right or not.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I don’t want to give anything away because this story will continue over the next few weeks.  It was definitely an educational and enjoyable experience that I’m glad to share.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I’m guessing that you accurately predicted the failure.  I’m not an engineer, but you certainly made this understandable enough to read at my level.  Best wishes as you go for Level II!!

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 12.

Very interesting! I’m sure you will be right on.

By Norm Watts on 2012 07 12.

Thanks for the differentation of RedBuilt products.  I forwarded to two customers who wanted to know more about RedForm I joists vs. the “look alikes.”

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 25.

It is great to be a part of the legacy.  Thank you for sharing some perspective on what you are seeing both large-scale in the economy, and how the RedBuilt/legacy Trus Joist business has weathered storms in the past.

By Jeff Jack on 2012 06 23.

I like the blog and appreciate the wisdom in your words.  The focus on thriving vs. surviving is an inspiring shift of perspective.  Not easy, but RedBuilt will thrive without a doubt.  If it were easy everyone would be doing it.  RedBuilt has created a toe hold and a beginning.  Carry on.

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 20.

Hey Kurt -
I enjoyed reading this post about the old Tj and dealing with the last great recession.  I still remember those “PBL” days, wondering as a new hire if I would walk into work one day and find out that I didn’t have a job.  Fortunately that never happened, and I enjoyed the heck out of working for a great company like Trus Joist.
You guys at RedBuilt have got the old Tj culture and believe me, that will help drive your success.  All the best!
- Chris

By Chris Meyer on 2012 06 19.

Thanks Duane!  It certainly can be confusing.

By pdrace on 2012 06 16.

Great article, Paul. Nice job of laying it all out!

By Duane Bolt on 2012 06 15.

What I was impressed by was the load demand against the LVL iJoists while working in a residential market. Ya’ll make good stuff.

By Max Stanford on 2012 06 12.

back to blog

Featured Projects—Best of 2014

Posted on January 14, 2015 by RedBuilt


At RedBuilt, we are fortunate to be a part of a wide variety of notable projects throughout North America (and beyond). 2014 was no exception.

Below are projects that we've featured throughout the year -- both in our e-newsletter and on our website.

 

Tuxedo Grill at Kansas City Zoo

7,300 square-foot café with a design that incorporated many sustainable building practices and included natural elements such as bamboo and exposed wood.

 

The 951

74,500 square feet of mixed-use space with 4,100 square feet designated for retail use on the first level with the rest dedicated to the 68 apartments on the upper floors.

 

Desert Mountain Residence

11,000 square foot custom residence with arched roof and strict building height restrictions and limitations.

 


If you haven't already, make sure you subscribe to our e-newsletter to ensure that you'll receive emails on our featured projects and much more throughout the year. Just enter your email address in the signup box at the bottom of the page.


Leave a Reply

Did you notice that on page 4 we are showing table fabrication at our Stayton, OR facility? If so, you have a good eye and you probably work at Stayton! But fabrication looks about the same in Delaware.

By Cornelia Sprung on 2015 04 27.

I am interested in finding out more about RedBuild open web floor joist for residential.

For the past 15 years we have desiign our floors for L480 (even with dimensioal lumber) We pour 10’ basement walls, use TJI’s and end up boxing around mechanicals and spendind to much time and money firestopping and drafrstopping for the new IRC and IBC. Were can I get more info on RedBiuld Open web Joist

By Rolling Rock Construction Co on 2014 07 03.

Not sure why but I found your closing line hilarious. Probably because it’s corny, however it’s probably true as well! Good to know everything went well in the process. Shoppers will definitely be happy Im sure!

By Angela - Chicago Garage Builders on 2013 10 10.

Fantastic win against Scotland. Absalotely great. I curled against your Dad. was a wonderful man. I grew up on the farm where Art and Aggie now live. We have retired to Athabasca an d winter in Mesa, Az. watch all the. Curling to keep cool. best wishes at the Olympics next year. continue success .  Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 03.

Thank you for your support Mr. Ruddick. Team USA and RedBuilt are very appreciative.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Thanks Henry,

I am from Perryvale, my Dad was Ernie Lehto. Would have been great if he could have been here to watch. One tough end against both Sweden and Canada yesterday, but we will bounce back today.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Congratulations on being part of the worlds curling. Are you from the lehto family and which one from perryvale . Very best of luck. We are curling fans and watch all the games. Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 01.

A dedicated redbuilt blog reader.. Thanks for the curling coverage. Congratulations Darren and go team USA.

By bill ruddick on 2013 03 31.

Here is Heinz Mueller’s response:

You are correct, Renaldo. This application would show up more in a commercial structure vs. a residential structure. For an application such as this, I would think a moisture sealant applied to the glulam material would help alleviate the potential issues. That being said, if you decided to go that route you would probably want to start weighing the cost/benefit ratio for using additional products/services (sealant & application) vs. using similar products (LVL, I-joist blocking, etc.) for the blocking/rim board in the floor/roof system. I hope that helps. Thank you for the question and for your interest in the RedBuilt blogs! Heinz

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Here is a great reply that was posted to RedBuilt’s Linked In page:

Renaldo Montenegro, I am going to assume that using Glulams for blocking is more suited for a commercial application rather than a residential application. Thus, the Glulams carrying a very large vertical load from above. In a residential use I would see this as an over kill. Yes, I agree on the moisture content of the Glulams shrinking. Would a moisture sealant applied on the Glulams’ work in this case? A very good article! Thanks for sharing.

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Great to to hear this!!!

By Renaldo Montenegro on 2012 10 17.

Epically informative.  I learned a lot.

By Greg Riley on 2012 10 12.

[...] Posted on October 10, 2012 by [...]

By Deeper is Cheaper | RedBuilt Blog | Michael T. Dai on 2012 10 10.

[...] Call your local representative for a no cost consultation.  Read part 1 here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? (Part 2) | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 18.

[...] Read Part 2 of this article here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 17.

Great article Tom.  Not to intrude, but I would like to expand on how the Redbuilt Design Centers can help the engineer of record.  When I say help, I really mean increase the EOR’s profits while specifying a safer structural roof/floor system.  As I think back to my time as a specifying engineer, specifying Redbuilt’s Open Web trusses saved me time (I can go on about the differences between Redbuilt’s Pin Connected Open Web trusses and plated trusses but that is for another time).  When an EOR saves time, they in essence increase profits.

How does Redbuilt save an EOR time (great question)?  We do all the gravity calculations and truss connections for every loading aspect of a roof/floor system.  All the EOR has to do is specify a truss depth, truss series, show all design loads required and maybe a connection detail or two (with or without the help of a Redbuilt technical representative).  Also, if the EOR requires a PE to stamp both the shop drawing and calculations, our internal designers and engineers will provide technical oversight and assurance that products are used as intended. 

Not only can we save an EOR time but we also provide some assurance and piece of mind.

By Guy Brousseau on 2012 08 23.

Interesting to read about what you are doing, Jason.

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 29.

Sorry for the late response.  I’m glad you have enjoyed the first two.  The third was posted this past week.  It was a fun experience.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 28.

I know that learning involves failure, so thank you for being humble enough to learn.
Thank you, too, for sharing.  I’m enjoying your journey.

By Kathy Bracisco on 2012 07 24.

There is more to come.  This story will continue over the next few weeks and the whole world will know whether I was right or not.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I don’t want to give anything away because this story will continue over the next few weeks.  It was definitely an educational and enjoyable experience that I’m glad to share.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I’m guessing that you accurately predicted the failure.  I’m not an engineer, but you certainly made this understandable enough to read at my level.  Best wishes as you go for Level II!!

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 12.

Very interesting! I’m sure you will be right on.

By Norm Watts on 2012 07 12.

Thanks for the differentation of RedBuilt products.  I forwarded to two customers who wanted to know more about RedForm I joists vs. the “look alikes.”

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 25.

It is great to be a part of the legacy.  Thank you for sharing some perspective on what you are seeing both large-scale in the economy, and how the RedBuilt/legacy Trus Joist business has weathered storms in the past.

By Jeff Jack on 2012 06 23.

I like the blog and appreciate the wisdom in your words.  The focus on thriving vs. surviving is an inspiring shift of perspective.  Not easy, but RedBuilt will thrive without a doubt.  If it were easy everyone would be doing it.  RedBuilt has created a toe hold and a beginning.  Carry on.

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 20.

Hey Kurt -
I enjoyed reading this post about the old Tj and dealing with the last great recession.  I still remember those “PBL” days, wondering as a new hire if I would walk into work one day and find out that I didn’t have a job.  Fortunately that never happened, and I enjoyed the heck out of working for a great company like Trus Joist.
You guys at RedBuilt have got the old Tj culture and believe me, that will help drive your success.  All the best!
- Chris

By Chris Meyer on 2012 06 19.

Thanks Duane!  It certainly can be confusing.

By pdrace on 2012 06 16.

Great article, Paul. Nice job of laying it all out!

By Duane Bolt on 2012 06 15.

What I was impressed by was the load demand against the LVL iJoists while working in a residential market. Ya’ll make good stuff.

By Max Stanford on 2012 06 12.

back to blog

An engineering guide to holiday decorating

Posted on December 16, 2014 by RedBuilt


Has preparing for Christmas and Santa’s arrival become an engineering feat? If not, it should be, according to our friends at GHD. Just like any project you start, it is critical you plan and design according to spec. Lucky for you, they have provided detailed drawings that you can follow to ensure your tree, fireplace and rooftop are compliant this holiday. Be aware, however, that harm to elves, or lack of a reindeer excrement management plan can lead to a mark of “Naughty” on Santa’s list.

Christmas engineering specs

Click the image above for a full size version.

Courtesy of GHD, used with permission.


Leave a Reply

Did you notice that on page 4 we are showing table fabrication at our Stayton, OR facility? If so, you have a good eye and you probably work at Stayton! But fabrication looks about the same in Delaware.

By Cornelia Sprung on 2015 04 27.

I am interested in finding out more about RedBuild open web floor joist for residential.

For the past 15 years we have desiign our floors for L480 (even with dimensioal lumber) We pour 10’ basement walls, use TJI’s and end up boxing around mechanicals and spendind to much time and money firestopping and drafrstopping for the new IRC and IBC. Were can I get more info on RedBiuld Open web Joist

By Rolling Rock Construction Co on 2014 07 03.

Not sure why but I found your closing line hilarious. Probably because it’s corny, however it’s probably true as well! Good to know everything went well in the process. Shoppers will definitely be happy Im sure!

By Angela - Chicago Garage Builders on 2013 10 10.

Fantastic win against Scotland. Absalotely great. I curled against your Dad. was a wonderful man. I grew up on the farm where Art and Aggie now live. We have retired to Athabasca an d winter in Mesa, Az. watch all the. Curling to keep cool. best wishes at the Olympics next year. continue success .  Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 03.

Thank you for your support Mr. Ruddick. Team USA and RedBuilt are very appreciative.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Thanks Henry,

I am from Perryvale, my Dad was Ernie Lehto. Would have been great if he could have been here to watch. One tough end against both Sweden and Canada yesterday, but we will bounce back today.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Congratulations on being part of the worlds curling. Are you from the lehto family and which one from perryvale . Very best of luck. We are curling fans and watch all the games. Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 01.

A dedicated redbuilt blog reader.. Thanks for the curling coverage. Congratulations Darren and go team USA.

By bill ruddick on 2013 03 31.

Here is Heinz Mueller’s response:

You are correct, Renaldo. This application would show up more in a commercial structure vs. a residential structure. For an application such as this, I would think a moisture sealant applied to the glulam material would help alleviate the potential issues. That being said, if you decided to go that route you would probably want to start weighing the cost/benefit ratio for using additional products/services (sealant & application) vs. using similar products (LVL, I-joist blocking, etc.) for the blocking/rim board in the floor/roof system. I hope that helps. Thank you for the question and for your interest in the RedBuilt blogs! Heinz

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Here is a great reply that was posted to RedBuilt’s Linked In page:

Renaldo Montenegro, I am going to assume that using Glulams for blocking is more suited for a commercial application rather than a residential application. Thus, the Glulams carrying a very large vertical load from above. In a residential use I would see this as an over kill. Yes, I agree on the moisture content of the Glulams shrinking. Would a moisture sealant applied on the Glulams’ work in this case? A very good article! Thanks for sharing.

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Great to to hear this!!!

By Renaldo Montenegro on 2012 10 17.

Epically informative.  I learned a lot.

By Greg Riley on 2012 10 12.

[...] Posted on October 10, 2012 by [...]

By Deeper is Cheaper | RedBuilt Blog | Michael T. Dai on 2012 10 10.

[...] Call your local representative for a no cost consultation.  Read part 1 here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? (Part 2) | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 18.

[...] Read Part 2 of this article here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 17.

Great article Tom.  Not to intrude, but I would like to expand on how the Redbuilt Design Centers can help the engineer of record.  When I say help, I really mean increase the EOR’s profits while specifying a safer structural roof/floor system.  As I think back to my time as a specifying engineer, specifying Redbuilt’s Open Web trusses saved me time (I can go on about the differences between Redbuilt’s Pin Connected Open Web trusses and plated trusses but that is for another time).  When an EOR saves time, they in essence increase profits.

How does Redbuilt save an EOR time (great question)?  We do all the gravity calculations and truss connections for every loading aspect of a roof/floor system.  All the EOR has to do is specify a truss depth, truss series, show all design loads required and maybe a connection detail or two (with or without the help of a Redbuilt technical representative).  Also, if the EOR requires a PE to stamp both the shop drawing and calculations, our internal designers and engineers will provide technical oversight and assurance that products are used as intended. 

Not only can we save an EOR time but we also provide some assurance and piece of mind.

By Guy Brousseau on 2012 08 23.

Interesting to read about what you are doing, Jason.

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 29.

Sorry for the late response.  I’m glad you have enjoyed the first two.  The third was posted this past week.  It was a fun experience.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 28.

I know that learning involves failure, so thank you for being humble enough to learn.
Thank you, too, for sharing.  I’m enjoying your journey.

By Kathy Bracisco on 2012 07 24.

There is more to come.  This story will continue over the next few weeks and the whole world will know whether I was right or not.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I don’t want to give anything away because this story will continue over the next few weeks.  It was definitely an educational and enjoyable experience that I’m glad to share.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I’m guessing that you accurately predicted the failure.  I’m not an engineer, but you certainly made this understandable enough to read at my level.  Best wishes as you go for Level II!!

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 12.

Very interesting! I’m sure you will be right on.

By Norm Watts on 2012 07 12.

Thanks for the differentation of RedBuilt products.  I forwarded to two customers who wanted to know more about RedForm I joists vs. the “look alikes.”

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 25.

It is great to be a part of the legacy.  Thank you for sharing some perspective on what you are seeing both large-scale in the economy, and how the RedBuilt/legacy Trus Joist business has weathered storms in the past.

By Jeff Jack on 2012 06 23.

I like the blog and appreciate the wisdom in your words.  The focus on thriving vs. surviving is an inspiring shift of perspective.  Not easy, but RedBuilt will thrive without a doubt.  If it were easy everyone would be doing it.  RedBuilt has created a toe hold and a beginning.  Carry on.

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 20.

Hey Kurt -
I enjoyed reading this post about the old Tj and dealing with the last great recession.  I still remember those “PBL” days, wondering as a new hire if I would walk into work one day and find out that I didn’t have a job.  Fortunately that never happened, and I enjoyed the heck out of working for a great company like Trus Joist.
You guys at RedBuilt have got the old Tj culture and believe me, that will help drive your success.  All the best!
- Chris

By Chris Meyer on 2012 06 19.

Thanks Duane!  It certainly can be confusing.

By pdrace on 2012 06 16.

Great article, Paul. Nice job of laying it all out!

By Duane Bolt on 2012 06 15.

What I was impressed by was the load demand against the LVL iJoists while working in a residential market. Ya’ll make good stuff.

By Max Stanford on 2012 06 12.

back to blog

Floor Vibration: An Everyday Thing

Posted on December 03, 2014 by RedBuilt


Our floor at home is designed for a live load of 40 pounds per square foot. I’ve never actually seen 40 pounds on each square foot of it, not all at once. None of us do. On my floor there’s just a scattering of chairs and tables and two useless cats. As cats go they’re relatively heavy, but I feel they pose no threat to the integrity of the structure.

I took a quick survey of the office, asking the question, “What does 40 psf look like to you?” The responses were illuminating:

  • “Dry dog food about thigh deep.”
  • “A whole rugby team crowded into the family room.”
  • “Wall to wall water bed, Baby!”

What this demonstrates is that the utility of office surveys has waned. That, and the sense that a true 40 psf floor load is something rarely seen.

On the other hand, I can tell you what does happen at our house on a daily basis. Every time somebody walks along the south wall of the dining room, the dishes in the cabinet clatter. It’s not very loud, just a slight jostling of ceramic. I’m sure you wouldn’t find it annoying—until you’ve put up with it for twenty years.

It’s comforting to know that if we ever want to go thigh-deep with the dry dog food, the floor will not collapse. We have the building code to thank for that—give credit where credit is due. But what I’d rather have is a floor that doesn’t vibrate every time I walk on it.

The responsibility for this sad state of affairs falls squarely on the shoulders of the builder. And I’d heap criticism on the guy, but hey, it was me. When I chose the floor joists for our house, I looked at a residential span chart. It’s right in the building code, for crying out loud! What more could you ask for? But the building code tells us how to design a floor that is safe and will not deflect too much under loads the floor is… well… never going to see, while the thing that happens every day—floor vibration—is completely ignored.

The thing to do—if only I had known it then!—is to check the vibration characteristics of the floor structure before building it. Given the stiffness, mass, and section properties of joist and sheathing, it’s easy enough to get a picture of how a floor will vibrate. And once you have estimates of frequency, amplitude, and acceleration, there are well-tested criteria you can apply to get a thumbs-up or thumbs-down. What’s even better is that it can be done in the click of a button, and that’s where RedSpec™ software comes in. RedBuilt’s single-member sizing software, RedSpec™, runs the numbers on any Red-I™ joist or RedBuilt™ open-web truss you like, and summarizes results with a FloorChoice™ rating on a scale of 0 to 10.

Where you want to be on that scale depends on your (or your client’s) expectations. Even in a typical office building, it’s pretty annoying to feel your office furniture subtly vibrate for eight hours a day, as colleagues walk past for coffee or the printer. While RedSpec™ software doesn’t go as far as gauging the stiffness of your chair or the strolling tendencies of an accountant; it places your floor’s performance on the FloorChoice™ rating scale. If office vibration is the concern, FloorChoice™ literature tells you that a rating between 4 and 6 is a good target for a typical office. A rating of 4 defines the minimum performance target, and a rating of 6 or greater signals possible overdesign and an opportunity for value engineering.

Although it’s nice to know you can safely host the rugby team in your home at any time, joist strength is rarely tested. On the other hand, in framed floors, vibration is something you experience every day—at home, at work, and wherever you go. Maybe you’d look forward to experimenting with base isolation on your china hutch. If not, it pays to do a proper dynamic design—or just click that button in RedSpec™ software.

Dwaine Charbonneau, P.E.

Resonance cartoon

courtesy of xkcd.com


Leave a Reply

Did you notice that on page 4 we are showing table fabrication at our Stayton, OR facility? If so, you have a good eye and you probably work at Stayton! But fabrication looks about the same in Delaware.

By Cornelia Sprung on 2015 04 27.

I am interested in finding out more about RedBuild open web floor joist for residential.

For the past 15 years we have desiign our floors for L480 (even with dimensioal lumber) We pour 10’ basement walls, use TJI’s and end up boxing around mechanicals and spendind to much time and money firestopping and drafrstopping for the new IRC and IBC. Were can I get more info on RedBiuld Open web Joist

By Rolling Rock Construction Co on 2014 07 03.

Not sure why but I found your closing line hilarious. Probably because it’s corny, however it’s probably true as well! Good to know everything went well in the process. Shoppers will definitely be happy Im sure!

By Angela - Chicago Garage Builders on 2013 10 10.

Fantastic win against Scotland. Absalotely great. I curled against your Dad. was a wonderful man. I grew up on the farm where Art and Aggie now live. We have retired to Athabasca an d winter in Mesa, Az. watch all the. Curling to keep cool. best wishes at the Olympics next year. continue success .  Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 03.

Thank you for your support Mr. Ruddick. Team USA and RedBuilt are very appreciative.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Thanks Henry,

I am from Perryvale, my Dad was Ernie Lehto. Would have been great if he could have been here to watch. One tough end against both Sweden and Canada yesterday, but we will bounce back today.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Congratulations on being part of the worlds curling. Are you from the lehto family and which one from perryvale . Very best of luck. We are curling fans and watch all the games. Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 01.

A dedicated redbuilt blog reader.. Thanks for the curling coverage. Congratulations Darren and go team USA.

By bill ruddick on 2013 03 31.

Here is Heinz Mueller’s response:

You are correct, Renaldo. This application would show up more in a commercial structure vs. a residential structure. For an application such as this, I would think a moisture sealant applied to the glulam material would help alleviate the potential issues. That being said, if you decided to go that route you would probably want to start weighing the cost/benefit ratio for using additional products/services (sealant & application) vs. using similar products (LVL, I-joist blocking, etc.) for the blocking/rim board in the floor/roof system. I hope that helps. Thank you for the question and for your interest in the RedBuilt blogs! Heinz

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Here is a great reply that was posted to RedBuilt’s Linked In page:

Renaldo Montenegro, I am going to assume that using Glulams for blocking is more suited for a commercial application rather than a residential application. Thus, the Glulams carrying a very large vertical load from above. In a residential use I would see this as an over kill. Yes, I agree on the moisture content of the Glulams shrinking. Would a moisture sealant applied on the Glulams’ work in this case? A very good article! Thanks for sharing.

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Great to to hear this!!!

By Renaldo Montenegro on 2012 10 17.

Epically informative.  I learned a lot.

By Greg Riley on 2012 10 12.

[...] Posted on October 10, 2012 by [...]

By Deeper is Cheaper | RedBuilt Blog | Michael T. Dai on 2012 10 10.

[...] Call your local representative for a no cost consultation.  Read part 1 here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? (Part 2) | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 18.

[...] Read Part 2 of this article here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 17.

Great article Tom.  Not to intrude, but I would like to expand on how the Redbuilt Design Centers can help the engineer of record.  When I say help, I really mean increase the EOR’s profits while specifying a safer structural roof/floor system.  As I think back to my time as a specifying engineer, specifying Redbuilt’s Open Web trusses saved me time (I can go on about the differences between Redbuilt’s Pin Connected Open Web trusses and plated trusses but that is for another time).  When an EOR saves time, they in essence increase profits.

How does Redbuilt save an EOR time (great question)?  We do all the gravity calculations and truss connections for every loading aspect of a roof/floor system.  All the EOR has to do is specify a truss depth, truss series, show all design loads required and maybe a connection detail or two (with or without the help of a Redbuilt technical representative).  Also, if the EOR requires a PE to stamp both the shop drawing and calculations, our internal designers and engineers will provide technical oversight and assurance that products are used as intended. 

Not only can we save an EOR time but we also provide some assurance and piece of mind.

By Guy Brousseau on 2012 08 23.

Interesting to read about what you are doing, Jason.

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 29.

Sorry for the late response.  I’m glad you have enjoyed the first two.  The third was posted this past week.  It was a fun experience.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 28.

I know that learning involves failure, so thank you for being humble enough to learn.
Thank you, too, for sharing.  I’m enjoying your journey.

By Kathy Bracisco on 2012 07 24.

There is more to come.  This story will continue over the next few weeks and the whole world will know whether I was right or not.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I don’t want to give anything away because this story will continue over the next few weeks.  It was definitely an educational and enjoyable experience that I’m glad to share.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I’m guessing that you accurately predicted the failure.  I’m not an engineer, but you certainly made this understandable enough to read at my level.  Best wishes as you go for Level II!!

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 12.

Very interesting! I’m sure you will be right on.

By Norm Watts on 2012 07 12.

Thanks for the differentation of RedBuilt products.  I forwarded to two customers who wanted to know more about RedForm I joists vs. the “look alikes.”

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 25.

It is great to be a part of the legacy.  Thank you for sharing some perspective on what you are seeing both large-scale in the economy, and how the RedBuilt/legacy Trus Joist business has weathered storms in the past.

By Jeff Jack on 2012 06 23.

I like the blog and appreciate the wisdom in your words.  The focus on thriving vs. surviving is an inspiring shift of perspective.  Not easy, but RedBuilt will thrive without a doubt.  If it were easy everyone would be doing it.  RedBuilt has created a toe hold and a beginning.  Carry on.

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 20.

Hey Kurt -
I enjoyed reading this post about the old Tj and dealing with the last great recession.  I still remember those “PBL” days, wondering as a new hire if I would walk into work one day and find out that I didn’t have a job.  Fortunately that never happened, and I enjoyed the heck out of working for a great company like Trus Joist.
You guys at RedBuilt have got the old Tj culture and believe me, that will help drive your success.  All the best!
- Chris

By Chris Meyer on 2012 06 19.

Thanks Duane!  It certainly can be confusing.

By pdrace on 2012 06 16.

Great article, Paul. Nice job of laying it all out!

By Duane Bolt on 2012 06 15.

What I was impressed by was the load demand against the LVL iJoists while working in a residential market. Ya’ll make good stuff.

By Max Stanford on 2012 06 12.

back to blog

Origin of the Penny Nail

Posted on October 28, 2014 by RedBuilt


By Erica Iverson, E.I.T.

Q: Why is a 10d nail called a 10 “penny” nail?

A: There is little hard evidence as to where the term “penny” originated as a nail size, but it is believed to have started in medieval England as the price for 100 nails. During that time, nails were very valuable and their size was standardized. They were, in effect, a secondary form of currency. The letter “d” comes from Denarius, a Roman coin similar to a penny. The abbreviation “d” was used in the UK for penny before the conversion of currency to a decimal system. Therefore 10d nails were 10 pennies for 100 nails. Penny-weight nails is a name that stuck even after nail size became independent from nail price.

More fun nail facts:

  • From 2d to 16d, nail length increases in ¼″ increments, but after 16d the lengths increase in ½″ increments.
  • During the American Revolution, nails were difficult to acquire in the colonies since England was the main manufacturer. Some abandoned houses were intentionally burned down in order to recover nails from the ashes. Many families during that time would manufacture nails in the evening in their homes for their own use and trade. Even Thomas Jefferson wrote, “In our private pursuits it is a great advantage that every honest employment is deemed honorable. I am myself a nail maker.”

References:
Nail (fastener). (2005, June 19). Retrieved October 27, 2014.
Norman Scott Brien Gras (1918). The Early English Customs System. Harvard University Press, Cambridge (MA). p. 701. Cited at Sizes.com with a quote from 1507.
"Penny". Sizes.com. Retrieved 2010-01-10.
H. Littlehales (1905). Medieval Rec. London City Church. Cited in the Oxford English Dictionary under "Penny" with a quote from 1426-1427.
"Penny" (subscription required). Oxford English Dictionary (2nd ed.). Retrieved 2010-05-30.


Leave a Reply

Did you notice that on page 4 we are showing table fabrication at our Stayton, OR facility? If so, you have a good eye and you probably work at Stayton! But fabrication looks about the same in Delaware.

By Cornelia Sprung on 2015 04 27.

I am interested in finding out more about RedBuild open web floor joist for residential.

For the past 15 years we have desiign our floors for L480 (even with dimensioal lumber) We pour 10’ basement walls, use TJI’s and end up boxing around mechanicals and spendind to much time and money firestopping and drafrstopping for the new IRC and IBC. Were can I get more info on RedBiuld Open web Joist

By Rolling Rock Construction Co on 2014 07 03.

Not sure why but I found your closing line hilarious. Probably because it’s corny, however it’s probably true as well! Good to know everything went well in the process. Shoppers will definitely be happy Im sure!

By Angela - Chicago Garage Builders on 2013 10 10.

Fantastic win against Scotland. Absalotely great. I curled against your Dad. was a wonderful man. I grew up on the farm where Art and Aggie now live. We have retired to Athabasca an d winter in Mesa, Az. watch all the. Curling to keep cool. best wishes at the Olympics next year. continue success .  Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 03.

Thank you for your support Mr. Ruddick. Team USA and RedBuilt are very appreciative.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Thanks Henry,

I am from Perryvale, my Dad was Ernie Lehto. Would have been great if he could have been here to watch. One tough end against both Sweden and Canada yesterday, but we will bounce back today.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Congratulations on being part of the worlds curling. Are you from the lehto family and which one from perryvale . Very best of luck. We are curling fans and watch all the games. Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 01.

A dedicated redbuilt blog reader.. Thanks for the curling coverage. Congratulations Darren and go team USA.

By bill ruddick on 2013 03 31.

Here is Heinz Mueller’s response:

You are correct, Renaldo. This application would show up more in a commercial structure vs. a residential structure. For an application such as this, I would think a moisture sealant applied to the glulam material would help alleviate the potential issues. That being said, if you decided to go that route you would probably want to start weighing the cost/benefit ratio for using additional products/services (sealant & application) vs. using similar products (LVL, I-joist blocking, etc.) for the blocking/rim board in the floor/roof system. I hope that helps. Thank you for the question and for your interest in the RedBuilt blogs! Heinz

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Here is a great reply that was posted to RedBuilt’s Linked In page:

Renaldo Montenegro, I am going to assume that using Glulams for blocking is more suited for a commercial application rather than a residential application. Thus, the Glulams carrying a very large vertical load from above. In a residential use I would see this as an over kill. Yes, I agree on the moisture content of the Glulams shrinking. Would a moisture sealant applied on the Glulams’ work in this case? A very good article! Thanks for sharing.

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Great to to hear this!!!

By Renaldo Montenegro on 2012 10 17.

Epically informative.  I learned a lot.

By Greg Riley on 2012 10 12.

[...] Posted on October 10, 2012 by [...]

By Deeper is Cheaper | RedBuilt Blog | Michael T. Dai on 2012 10 10.

[...] Call your local representative for a no cost consultation.  Read part 1 here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? (Part 2) | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 18.

[...] Read Part 2 of this article here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 17.

Great article Tom.  Not to intrude, but I would like to expand on how the Redbuilt Design Centers can help the engineer of record.  When I say help, I really mean increase the EOR’s profits while specifying a safer structural roof/floor system.  As I think back to my time as a specifying engineer, specifying Redbuilt’s Open Web trusses saved me time (I can go on about the differences between Redbuilt’s Pin Connected Open Web trusses and plated trusses but that is for another time).  When an EOR saves time, they in essence increase profits.

How does Redbuilt save an EOR time (great question)?  We do all the gravity calculations and truss connections for every loading aspect of a roof/floor system.  All the EOR has to do is specify a truss depth, truss series, show all design loads required and maybe a connection detail or two (with or without the help of a Redbuilt technical representative).  Also, if the EOR requires a PE to stamp both the shop drawing and calculations, our internal designers and engineers will provide technical oversight and assurance that products are used as intended. 

Not only can we save an EOR time but we also provide some assurance and piece of mind.

By Guy Brousseau on 2012 08 23.

Interesting to read about what you are doing, Jason.

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 29.

Sorry for the late response.  I’m glad you have enjoyed the first two.  The third was posted this past week.  It was a fun experience.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 28.

I know that learning involves failure, so thank you for being humble enough to learn.
Thank you, too, for sharing.  I’m enjoying your journey.

By Kathy Bracisco on 2012 07 24.

There is more to come.  This story will continue over the next few weeks and the whole world will know whether I was right or not.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I don’t want to give anything away because this story will continue over the next few weeks.  It was definitely an educational and enjoyable experience that I’m glad to share.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I’m guessing that you accurately predicted the failure.  I’m not an engineer, but you certainly made this understandable enough to read at my level.  Best wishes as you go for Level II!!

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 12.

Very interesting! I’m sure you will be right on.

By Norm Watts on 2012 07 12.

Thanks for the differentation of RedBuilt products.  I forwarded to two customers who wanted to know more about RedForm I joists vs. the “look alikes.”

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 25.

It is great to be a part of the legacy.  Thank you for sharing some perspective on what you are seeing both large-scale in the economy, and how the RedBuilt/legacy Trus Joist business has weathered storms in the past.

By Jeff Jack on 2012 06 23.

I like the blog and appreciate the wisdom in your words.  The focus on thriving vs. surviving is an inspiring shift of perspective.  Not easy, but RedBuilt will thrive without a doubt.  If it were easy everyone would be doing it.  RedBuilt has created a toe hold and a beginning.  Carry on.

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 20.

Hey Kurt -
I enjoyed reading this post about the old Tj and dealing with the last great recession.  I still remember those “PBL” days, wondering as a new hire if I would walk into work one day and find out that I didn’t have a job.  Fortunately that never happened, and I enjoyed the heck out of working for a great company like Trus Joist.
You guys at RedBuilt have got the old Tj culture and believe me, that will help drive your success.  All the best!
- Chris

By Chris Meyer on 2012 06 19.

Thanks Duane!  It certainly can be confusing.

By pdrace on 2012 06 16.

Great article, Paul. Nice job of laying it all out!

By Duane Bolt on 2012 06 15.

What I was impressed by was the load demand against the LVL iJoists while working in a residential market. Ya’ll make good stuff.

By Max Stanford on 2012 06 12.

back to blog

RedBuilt Welcomes New Regional Sales Managers and Marketing Manager

Posted on July 17, 2014 by RedBuilt


Yesterday we announced that we recently added Cornelia Sprung as Marketing Manager and bolstered our sales leadership in the Western United States and Canada with the addition of Mike Hayley and Jason Weber as Regional Sales Managers. Together, they bring a combined 59 years of EWP experience to our sales and marketing leadership team.

Read the full release about Cornelia, Mike and Jason here.


Leave a Reply

Did you notice that on page 4 we are showing table fabrication at our Stayton, OR facility? If so, you have a good eye and you probably work at Stayton! But fabrication looks about the same in Delaware.

By Cornelia Sprung on 2015 04 27.

I am interested in finding out more about RedBuild open web floor joist for residential.

For the past 15 years we have desiign our floors for L480 (even with dimensioal lumber) We pour 10’ basement walls, use TJI’s and end up boxing around mechanicals and spendind to much time and money firestopping and drafrstopping for the new IRC and IBC. Were can I get more info on RedBiuld Open web Joist

By Rolling Rock Construction Co on 2014 07 03.

Not sure why but I found your closing line hilarious. Probably because it’s corny, however it’s probably true as well! Good to know everything went well in the process. Shoppers will definitely be happy Im sure!

By Angela - Chicago Garage Builders on 2013 10 10.

Fantastic win against Scotland. Absalotely great. I curled against your Dad. was a wonderful man. I grew up on the farm where Art and Aggie now live. We have retired to Athabasca an d winter in Mesa, Az. watch all the. Curling to keep cool. best wishes at the Olympics next year. continue success .  Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 03.

Thank you for your support Mr. Ruddick. Team USA and RedBuilt are very appreciative.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Thanks Henry,

I am from Perryvale, my Dad was Ernie Lehto. Would have been great if he could have been here to watch. One tough end against both Sweden and Canada yesterday, but we will bounce back today.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Congratulations on being part of the worlds curling. Are you from the lehto family and which one from perryvale . Very best of luck. We are curling fans and watch all the games. Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 01.

A dedicated redbuilt blog reader.. Thanks for the curling coverage. Congratulations Darren and go team USA.

By bill ruddick on 2013 03 31.

Here is Heinz Mueller’s response:

You are correct, Renaldo. This application would show up more in a commercial structure vs. a residential structure. For an application such as this, I would think a moisture sealant applied to the glulam material would help alleviate the potential issues. That being said, if you decided to go that route you would probably want to start weighing the cost/benefit ratio for using additional products/services (sealant & application) vs. using similar products (LVL, I-joist blocking, etc.) for the blocking/rim board in the floor/roof system. I hope that helps. Thank you for the question and for your interest in the RedBuilt blogs! Heinz

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Here is a great reply that was posted to RedBuilt’s Linked In page:

Renaldo Montenegro, I am going to assume that using Glulams for blocking is more suited for a commercial application rather than a residential application. Thus, the Glulams carrying a very large vertical load from above. In a residential use I would see this as an over kill. Yes, I agree on the moisture content of the Glulams shrinking. Would a moisture sealant applied on the Glulams’ work in this case? A very good article! Thanks for sharing.

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Great to to hear this!!!

By Renaldo Montenegro on 2012 10 17.

Epically informative.  I learned a lot.

By Greg Riley on 2012 10 12.

[...] Posted on October 10, 2012 by [...]

By Deeper is Cheaper | RedBuilt Blog | Michael T. Dai on 2012 10 10.

[...] Call your local representative for a no cost consultation.  Read part 1 here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? (Part 2) | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 18.

[...] Read Part 2 of this article here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 17.

Great article Tom.  Not to intrude, but I would like to expand on how the Redbuilt Design Centers can help the engineer of record.  When I say help, I really mean increase the EOR’s profits while specifying a safer structural roof/floor system.  As I think back to my time as a specifying engineer, specifying Redbuilt’s Open Web trusses saved me time (I can go on about the differences between Redbuilt’s Pin Connected Open Web trusses and plated trusses but that is for another time).  When an EOR saves time, they in essence increase profits.

How does Redbuilt save an EOR time (great question)?  We do all the gravity calculations and truss connections for every loading aspect of a roof/floor system.  All the EOR has to do is specify a truss depth, truss series, show all design loads required and maybe a connection detail or two (with or without the help of a Redbuilt technical representative).  Also, if the EOR requires a PE to stamp both the shop drawing and calculations, our internal designers and engineers will provide technical oversight and assurance that products are used as intended. 

Not only can we save an EOR time but we also provide some assurance and piece of mind.

By Guy Brousseau on 2012 08 23.

Interesting to read about what you are doing, Jason.

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 29.

Sorry for the late response.  I’m glad you have enjoyed the first two.  The third was posted this past week.  It was a fun experience.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 28.

I know that learning involves failure, so thank you for being humble enough to learn.
Thank you, too, for sharing.  I’m enjoying your journey.

By Kathy Bracisco on 2012 07 24.

There is more to come.  This story will continue over the next few weeks and the whole world will know whether I was right or not.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I don’t want to give anything away because this story will continue over the next few weeks.  It was definitely an educational and enjoyable experience that I’m glad to share.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I’m guessing that you accurately predicted the failure.  I’m not an engineer, but you certainly made this understandable enough to read at my level.  Best wishes as you go for Level II!!

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 12.

Very interesting! I’m sure you will be right on.

By Norm Watts on 2012 07 12.

Thanks for the differentation of RedBuilt products.  I forwarded to two customers who wanted to know more about RedForm I joists vs. the “look alikes.”

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 25.

It is great to be a part of the legacy.  Thank you for sharing some perspective on what you are seeing both large-scale in the economy, and how the RedBuilt/legacy Trus Joist business has weathered storms in the past.

By Jeff Jack on 2012 06 23.

I like the blog and appreciate the wisdom in your words.  The focus on thriving vs. surviving is an inspiring shift of perspective.  Not easy, but RedBuilt will thrive without a doubt.  If it were easy everyone would be doing it.  RedBuilt has created a toe hold and a beginning.  Carry on.

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 20.

Hey Kurt -
I enjoyed reading this post about the old Tj and dealing with the last great recession.  I still remember those “PBL” days, wondering as a new hire if I would walk into work one day and find out that I didn’t have a job.  Fortunately that never happened, and I enjoyed the heck out of working for a great company like Trus Joist.
You guys at RedBuilt have got the old Tj culture and believe me, that will help drive your success.  All the best!
- Chris

By Chris Meyer on 2012 06 19.

Thanks Duane!  It certainly can be confusing.

By pdrace on 2012 06 16.

Great article, Paul. Nice job of laying it all out!

By Duane Bolt on 2012 06 15.

What I was impressed by was the load demand against the LVL iJoists while working in a residential market. Ya’ll make good stuff.

By Max Stanford on 2012 06 12.

back to blog

RedBuilt Open-Web Truss Review from Matt Risinger

Posted on June 06, 2014 by RedBuilt


Matt Risinger, a custom home builder in central Texas, recently used RedBuilt’s open-web trusses for the first time while working on a project with Michael Hsu Office of Architecture. In his video review below, he raved about the trusses, and how they were able to meet the unique design requirements – without sacrificing functionality – by using our open-web trusses.

Watch Risinger's open-web truss review:

Visit Matt Risinger's Blog


Leave a Reply

Did you notice that on page 4 we are showing table fabrication at our Stayton, OR facility? If so, you have a good eye and you probably work at Stayton! But fabrication looks about the same in Delaware.

By Cornelia Sprung on 2015 04 27.

I am interested in finding out more about RedBuild open web floor joist for residential.

For the past 15 years we have desiign our floors for L480 (even with dimensioal lumber) We pour 10’ basement walls, use TJI’s and end up boxing around mechanicals and spendind to much time and money firestopping and drafrstopping for the new IRC and IBC. Were can I get more info on RedBiuld Open web Joist

By Rolling Rock Construction Co on 2014 07 03.

Not sure why but I found your closing line hilarious. Probably because it’s corny, however it’s probably true as well! Good to know everything went well in the process. Shoppers will definitely be happy Im sure!

By Angela - Chicago Garage Builders on 2013 10 10.

Fantastic win against Scotland. Absalotely great. I curled against your Dad. was a wonderful man. I grew up on the farm where Art and Aggie now live. We have retired to Athabasca an d winter in Mesa, Az. watch all the. Curling to keep cool. best wishes at the Olympics next year. continue success .  Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 03.

Thank you for your support Mr. Ruddick. Team USA and RedBuilt are very appreciative.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Thanks Henry,

I am from Perryvale, my Dad was Ernie Lehto. Would have been great if he could have been here to watch. One tough end against both Sweden and Canada yesterday, but we will bounce back today.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Congratulations on being part of the worlds curling. Are you from the lehto family and which one from perryvale . Very best of luck. We are curling fans and watch all the games. Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 01.

A dedicated redbuilt blog reader.. Thanks for the curling coverage. Congratulations Darren and go team USA.

By bill ruddick on 2013 03 31.

Here is Heinz Mueller’s response:

You are correct, Renaldo. This application would show up more in a commercial structure vs. a residential structure. For an application such as this, I would think a moisture sealant applied to the glulam material would help alleviate the potential issues. That being said, if you decided to go that route you would probably want to start weighing the cost/benefit ratio for using additional products/services (sealant & application) vs. using similar products (LVL, I-joist blocking, etc.) for the blocking/rim board in the floor/roof system. I hope that helps. Thank you for the question and for your interest in the RedBuilt blogs! Heinz

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Here is a great reply that was posted to RedBuilt’s Linked In page:

Renaldo Montenegro, I am going to assume that using Glulams for blocking is more suited for a commercial application rather than a residential application. Thus, the Glulams carrying a very large vertical load from above. In a residential use I would see this as an over kill. Yes, I agree on the moisture content of the Glulams shrinking. Would a moisture sealant applied on the Glulams’ work in this case? A very good article! Thanks for sharing.

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Great to to hear this!!!

By Renaldo Montenegro on 2012 10 17.

Epically informative.  I learned a lot.

By Greg Riley on 2012 10 12.

[...] Posted on October 10, 2012 by [...]

By Deeper is Cheaper | RedBuilt Blog | Michael T. Dai on 2012 10 10.

[...] Call your local representative for a no cost consultation.  Read part 1 here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? (Part 2) | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 18.

[...] Read Part 2 of this article here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 17.

Great article Tom.  Not to intrude, but I would like to expand on how the Redbuilt Design Centers can help the engineer of record.  When I say help, I really mean increase the EOR’s profits while specifying a safer structural roof/floor system.  As I think back to my time as a specifying engineer, specifying Redbuilt’s Open Web trusses saved me time (I can go on about the differences between Redbuilt’s Pin Connected Open Web trusses and plated trusses but that is for another time).  When an EOR saves time, they in essence increase profits.

How does Redbuilt save an EOR time (great question)?  We do all the gravity calculations and truss connections for every loading aspect of a roof/floor system.  All the EOR has to do is specify a truss depth, truss series, show all design loads required and maybe a connection detail or two (with or without the help of a Redbuilt technical representative).  Also, if the EOR requires a PE to stamp both the shop drawing and calculations, our internal designers and engineers will provide technical oversight and assurance that products are used as intended. 

Not only can we save an EOR time but we also provide some assurance and piece of mind.

By Guy Brousseau on 2012 08 23.

Interesting to read about what you are doing, Jason.

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 29.

Sorry for the late response.  I’m glad you have enjoyed the first two.  The third was posted this past week.  It was a fun experience.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 28.

I know that learning involves failure, so thank you for being humble enough to learn.
Thank you, too, for sharing.  I’m enjoying your journey.

By Kathy Bracisco on 2012 07 24.

There is more to come.  This story will continue over the next few weeks and the whole world will know whether I was right or not.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I don’t want to give anything away because this story will continue over the next few weeks.  It was definitely an educational and enjoyable experience that I’m glad to share.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I’m guessing that you accurately predicted the failure.  I’m not an engineer, but you certainly made this understandable enough to read at my level.  Best wishes as you go for Level II!!

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 12.

Very interesting! I’m sure you will be right on.

By Norm Watts on 2012 07 12.

Thanks for the differentation of RedBuilt products.  I forwarded to two customers who wanted to know more about RedForm I joists vs. the “look alikes.”

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 25.

It is great to be a part of the legacy.  Thank you for sharing some perspective on what you are seeing both large-scale in the economy, and how the RedBuilt/legacy Trus Joist business has weathered storms in the past.

By Jeff Jack on 2012 06 23.

I like the blog and appreciate the wisdom in your words.  The focus on thriving vs. surviving is an inspiring shift of perspective.  Not easy, but RedBuilt will thrive without a doubt.  If it were easy everyone would be doing it.  RedBuilt has created a toe hold and a beginning.  Carry on.

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 20.

Hey Kurt -
I enjoyed reading this post about the old Tj and dealing with the last great recession.  I still remember those “PBL” days, wondering as a new hire if I would walk into work one day and find out that I didn’t have a job.  Fortunately that never happened, and I enjoyed the heck out of working for a great company like Trus Joist.
You guys at RedBuilt have got the old Tj culture and believe me, that will help drive your success.  All the best!
- Chris

By Chris Meyer on 2012 06 19.

Thanks Duane!  It certainly can be confusing.

By pdrace on 2012 06 16.

Great article, Paul. Nice job of laying it all out!

By Duane Bolt on 2012 06 15.

What I was impressed by was the load demand against the LVL iJoists while working in a residential market. Ya’ll make good stuff.

By Max Stanford on 2012 06 12.

back to blog

Taylor Middle School Cafeteria: Using Long-Span Scissor Trusses to Create a Structurally Sound Build

Posted on October 07, 2013 by RedBuilt


By the end of the year, students at Taylor Middle School in Millbrae, California, will be able to enjoy a balanced meal in the comfort of a new 15,694-square-foot cafeteria.

Taylor Middle School Cafeteria constructionBecause the students’ old cafeteria had become too small and was showing its age, Millbrae School District (MSD) enlisted the help of architect Richard Lawrence from IBI Group Architecture Planning to create a cafeteria with a central kitchen that could serve all schools in the district and function as a venue for graduations, board meetings, community meetings and even basketball and volleyball games.

IBI retained the services of Michael Parolini, an engineer at the San Luis Obispo based Smith Structural Group, to design the structure. Parolini asked the RedBuilt™ team to assist with the project’s roof system.

Taylor Middle School Cafeteria ConstructionInitially, Parolini started with a four-foot on-center scissor truss system that spanned the width of the cafeteria. Lawrence and IBI reviewed the initial concept and conveyed that they wanted more of an open feel since the roof system was going to be exposed. To achieve this look, the team came up with a final design that consisted of double trusses at eight-foot on-center. RedBuilt™ engineers worked closely with Parolini on designs, revising calculations and truss panel layouts to meet seismic and other loading requirements from California DSA (Division of the State Architect) and the school district.

Open-web trusses awaiting on-site assembly by Blach ConstructionPrior to installation, RedBuilt™ engineers worked with Blach Construction and its in-house design team to build 3D AutoCAD® models to get an accurate layout and slope, as well as bolt locations for the hold downs. The double 75-foot Red-H™ scissor trusses were then shipped in two pieces, and the Santa Clara-based Blach Construction assembled them on-site.

“Installing the trusses was challenging because of the eight-foot on-center system and because they needed to be connected to CMU block walls while meeting DSA requirements,” says RedBuilt™ sales rep Mike Hayley. According to Parolini, connecting the trusses to the block walls was a key part of the project. “Since the cafeteria is in a high seismic risk area, we had to take special consideration in connecting the roof framing system to the wall,” he says. “The attachment is essentially what holds the building together so all structural systems can remain fully functioning before, during and after a seismic event.”

RedLam LVLAside from the trusses, RedBuilt also supplied Red-I™ I-joists and RedLam™ LVL in the cafeteria’s kitchen, bathrooms and entry.

Built in 1939, Taylor Middle School is number 10 on the Millbrae Historical Society’s Millbrae History Walk. Its students are known for their academic achievements.

IBI Group Architecture Planning began the cafeteria project in December 2012 and plans to complete the building in December 2013. During construction, students have been eating across campus in a space converted into a temporary lunch kitchen.

Although no one knows for sure what the future holds for Taylor Middle School’s 1,000 students, we do know one thing: by the end of the year, they’ll be eating lunch in style.

Learn more about this project and the team behind it, and see additional photos on our website.


Leave a Reply

Did you notice that on page 4 we are showing table fabrication at our Stayton, OR facility? If so, you have a good eye and you probably work at Stayton! But fabrication looks about the same in Delaware.

By Cornelia Sprung on 2015 04 27.

I am interested in finding out more about RedBuild open web floor joist for residential.

For the past 15 years we have desiign our floors for L480 (even with dimensioal lumber) We pour 10’ basement walls, use TJI’s and end up boxing around mechanicals and spendind to much time and money firestopping and drafrstopping for the new IRC and IBC. Were can I get more info on RedBiuld Open web Joist

By Rolling Rock Construction Co on 2014 07 03.

Not sure why but I found your closing line hilarious. Probably because it’s corny, however it’s probably true as well! Good to know everything went well in the process. Shoppers will definitely be happy Im sure!

By Angela - Chicago Garage Builders on 2013 10 10.

Fantastic win against Scotland. Absalotely great. I curled against your Dad. was a wonderful man. I grew up on the farm where Art and Aggie now live. We have retired to Athabasca an d winter in Mesa, Az. watch all the. Curling to keep cool. best wishes at the Olympics next year. continue success .  Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 03.

Thank you for your support Mr. Ruddick. Team USA and RedBuilt are very appreciative.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Thanks Henry,

I am from Perryvale, my Dad was Ernie Lehto. Would have been great if he could have been here to watch. One tough end against both Sweden and Canada yesterday, but we will bounce back today.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Congratulations on being part of the worlds curling. Are you from the lehto family and which one from perryvale . Very best of luck. We are curling fans and watch all the games. Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 01.

A dedicated redbuilt blog reader.. Thanks for the curling coverage. Congratulations Darren and go team USA.

By bill ruddick on 2013 03 31.

Here is Heinz Mueller’s response:

You are correct, Renaldo. This application would show up more in a commercial structure vs. a residential structure. For an application such as this, I would think a moisture sealant applied to the glulam material would help alleviate the potential issues. That being said, if you decided to go that route you would probably want to start weighing the cost/benefit ratio for using additional products/services (sealant & application) vs. using similar products (LVL, I-joist blocking, etc.) for the blocking/rim board in the floor/roof system. I hope that helps. Thank you for the question and for your interest in the RedBuilt blogs! Heinz

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Here is a great reply that was posted to RedBuilt’s Linked In page:

Renaldo Montenegro, I am going to assume that using Glulams for blocking is more suited for a commercial application rather than a residential application. Thus, the Glulams carrying a very large vertical load from above. In a residential use I would see this as an over kill. Yes, I agree on the moisture content of the Glulams shrinking. Would a moisture sealant applied on the Glulams’ work in this case? A very good article! Thanks for sharing.

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Great to to hear this!!!

By Renaldo Montenegro on 2012 10 17.

Epically informative.  I learned a lot.

By Greg Riley on 2012 10 12.

[...] Posted on October 10, 2012 by [...]

By Deeper is Cheaper | RedBuilt Blog | Michael T. Dai on 2012 10 10.

[...] Call your local representative for a no cost consultation.  Read part 1 here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? (Part 2) | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 18.

[...] Read Part 2 of this article here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 17.

Great article Tom.  Not to intrude, but I would like to expand on how the Redbuilt Design Centers can help the engineer of record.  When I say help, I really mean increase the EOR’s profits while specifying a safer structural roof/floor system.  As I think back to my time as a specifying engineer, specifying Redbuilt’s Open Web trusses saved me time (I can go on about the differences between Redbuilt’s Pin Connected Open Web trusses and plated trusses but that is for another time).  When an EOR saves time, they in essence increase profits.

How does Redbuilt save an EOR time (great question)?  We do all the gravity calculations and truss connections for every loading aspect of a roof/floor system.  All the EOR has to do is specify a truss depth, truss series, show all design loads required and maybe a connection detail or two (with or without the help of a Redbuilt technical representative).  Also, if the EOR requires a PE to stamp both the shop drawing and calculations, our internal designers and engineers will provide technical oversight and assurance that products are used as intended. 

Not only can we save an EOR time but we also provide some assurance and piece of mind.

By Guy Brousseau on 2012 08 23.

Interesting to read about what you are doing, Jason.

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 29.

Sorry for the late response.  I’m glad you have enjoyed the first two.  The third was posted this past week.  It was a fun experience.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 28.

I know that learning involves failure, so thank you for being humble enough to learn.
Thank you, too, for sharing.  I’m enjoying your journey.

By Kathy Bracisco on 2012 07 24.

There is more to come.  This story will continue over the next few weeks and the whole world will know whether I was right or not.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I don’t want to give anything away because this story will continue over the next few weeks.  It was definitely an educational and enjoyable experience that I’m glad to share.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I’m guessing that you accurately predicted the failure.  I’m not an engineer, but you certainly made this understandable enough to read at my level.  Best wishes as you go for Level II!!

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 12.

Very interesting! I’m sure you will be right on.

By Norm Watts on 2012 07 12.

Thanks for the differentation of RedBuilt products.  I forwarded to two customers who wanted to know more about RedForm I joists vs. the “look alikes.”

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 25.

It is great to be a part of the legacy.  Thank you for sharing some perspective on what you are seeing both large-scale in the economy, and how the RedBuilt/legacy Trus Joist business has weathered storms in the past.

By Jeff Jack on 2012 06 23.

I like the blog and appreciate the wisdom in your words.  The focus on thriving vs. surviving is an inspiring shift of perspective.  Not easy, but RedBuilt will thrive without a doubt.  If it were easy everyone would be doing it.  RedBuilt has created a toe hold and a beginning.  Carry on.

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 20.

Hey Kurt -
I enjoyed reading this post about the old Tj and dealing with the last great recession.  I still remember those “PBL” days, wondering as a new hire if I would walk into work one day and find out that I didn’t have a job.  Fortunately that never happened, and I enjoyed the heck out of working for a great company like Trus Joist.
You guys at RedBuilt have got the old Tj culture and believe me, that will help drive your success.  All the best!
- Chris

By Chris Meyer on 2012 06 19.

Thanks Duane!  It certainly can be confusing.

By pdrace on 2012 06 16.

Great article, Paul. Nice job of laying it all out!

By Duane Bolt on 2012 06 15.

What I was impressed by was the load demand against the LVL iJoists while working in a residential market. Ya’ll make good stuff.

By Max Stanford on 2012 06 12.

back to blog

U.Village Parking Garage: Building Prefabricated, Ready-to-Use Formwork Systems

Posted on September 30, 2013 by RedBuilt


For shoppers at U.Village, Seattle’s trendy outdoor mall near the entrance to the University of Washington, finding a parking spot can be next to impossible. Chris Moes, senior project manager at the Maple Valley-based McClone Construction, hopes that will change with the mall’s new five-story, 350,000-square-foot parking garage that is currently under construction.

U.Village parking garage constructionMoes and McClone Construction helped form all of the garage’s horizontal concrete decks and beams. Because the job site was small and time was limited, McClone enlisted RedBuilt™ to create 180 fully prefabricated formwork tables up to 8’ x 23’ in size to form the underside of seven-inch-thick concrete decks.

“The project schedule and site logistics were a challenge from the start,” says Steve Murray, field operations manager at McClone Construction. “There was not time in the schedule or room on site for us to fabricate the deck tables needed for the parking structure. We needed tables that could be delivered and ready to use immediately, and RedBuilt provided that.”

To create the formwork tables, the RedBuilt™ team used cambered RedForm™ I-joists, a product manufactured and designed specifically for use in forming applications (temporarily supporting a concrete slab until it has enough strength to support itself and all imposed loads). RedBuilt™ also provided McClone with a dedicated team of technical and field support specialists with expertise in forming applications throughout the design and installation process.

U.Village parking garage constructionAccording to Moes, using prefabricated table forms with cambered RedForm™ I-joists gave the McClone team the flexibility they needed to carry concrete slabs with bay widths of 26 feet without the need for any intermediate shoring or support.

“Working with RedBuilt™ to build the deck panels at their plant was instrumental in the success of this project,” he says. “We were able to truck them to the site for use on scheduled pours right when we needed them.”

Featuring 550 parking stalls, the U.Village garage will offer free parking to mall patrons. Construction began in January, and is scheduled to be completed in October 2013. Once open and more parking spaces are available, shoppers will likely be wearing a new accessory—a nice big smile.

Learn more about the project, the team behind it, and see additional photos on our website.


Leave a Reply

Did you notice that on page 4 we are showing table fabrication at our Stayton, OR facility? If so, you have a good eye and you probably work at Stayton! But fabrication looks about the same in Delaware.

By Cornelia Sprung on 2015 04 27.

I am interested in finding out more about RedBuild open web floor joist for residential.

For the past 15 years we have desiign our floors for L480 (even with dimensioal lumber) We pour 10’ basement walls, use TJI’s and end up boxing around mechanicals and spendind to much time and money firestopping and drafrstopping for the new IRC and IBC. Were can I get more info on RedBiuld Open web Joist

By Rolling Rock Construction Co on 2014 07 03.

Not sure why but I found your closing line hilarious. Probably because it’s corny, however it’s probably true as well! Good to know everything went well in the process. Shoppers will definitely be happy Im sure!

By Angela - Chicago Garage Builders on 2013 10 10.

Fantastic win against Scotland. Absalotely great. I curled against your Dad. was a wonderful man. I grew up on the farm where Art and Aggie now live. We have retired to Athabasca an d winter in Mesa, Az. watch all the. Curling to keep cool. best wishes at the Olympics next year. continue success .  Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 03.

Thank you for your support Mr. Ruddick. Team USA and RedBuilt are very appreciative.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Thanks Henry,

I am from Perryvale, my Dad was Ernie Lehto. Would have been great if he could have been here to watch. One tough end against both Sweden and Canada yesterday, but we will bounce back today.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Congratulations on being part of the worlds curling. Are you from the lehto family and which one from perryvale . Very best of luck. We are curling fans and watch all the games. Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 01.

A dedicated redbuilt blog reader.. Thanks for the curling coverage. Congratulations Darren and go team USA.

By bill ruddick on 2013 03 31.

Here is Heinz Mueller’s response:

You are correct, Renaldo. This application would show up more in a commercial structure vs. a residential structure. For an application such as this, I would think a moisture sealant applied to the glulam material would help alleviate the potential issues. That being said, if you decided to go that route you would probably want to start weighing the cost/benefit ratio for using additional products/services (sealant & application) vs. using similar products (LVL, I-joist blocking, etc.) for the blocking/rim board in the floor/roof system. I hope that helps. Thank you for the question and for your interest in the RedBuilt blogs! Heinz

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Here is a great reply that was posted to RedBuilt’s Linked In page:

Renaldo Montenegro, I am going to assume that using Glulams for blocking is more suited for a commercial application rather than a residential application. Thus, the Glulams carrying a very large vertical load from above. In a residential use I would see this as an over kill. Yes, I agree on the moisture content of the Glulams shrinking. Would a moisture sealant applied on the Glulams’ work in this case? A very good article! Thanks for sharing.

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Great to to hear this!!!

By Renaldo Montenegro on 2012 10 17.

Epically informative.  I learned a lot.

By Greg Riley on 2012 10 12.

[...] Posted on October 10, 2012 by [...]

By Deeper is Cheaper | RedBuilt Blog | Michael T. Dai on 2012 10 10.

[...] Call your local representative for a no cost consultation.  Read part 1 here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? (Part 2) | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 18.

[...] Read Part 2 of this article here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 17.

Great article Tom.  Not to intrude, but I would like to expand on how the Redbuilt Design Centers can help the engineer of record.  When I say help, I really mean increase the EOR’s profits while specifying a safer structural roof/floor system.  As I think back to my time as a specifying engineer, specifying Redbuilt’s Open Web trusses saved me time (I can go on about the differences between Redbuilt’s Pin Connected Open Web trusses and plated trusses but that is for another time).  When an EOR saves time, they in essence increase profits.

How does Redbuilt save an EOR time (great question)?  We do all the gravity calculations and truss connections for every loading aspect of a roof/floor system.  All the EOR has to do is specify a truss depth, truss series, show all design loads required and maybe a connection detail or two (with or without the help of a Redbuilt technical representative).  Also, if the EOR requires a PE to stamp both the shop drawing and calculations, our internal designers and engineers will provide technical oversight and assurance that products are used as intended. 

Not only can we save an EOR time but we also provide some assurance and piece of mind.

By Guy Brousseau on 2012 08 23.

Interesting to read about what you are doing, Jason.

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 29.

Sorry for the late response.  I’m glad you have enjoyed the first two.  The third was posted this past week.  It was a fun experience.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 28.

I know that learning involves failure, so thank you for being humble enough to learn.
Thank you, too, for sharing.  I’m enjoying your journey.

By Kathy Bracisco on 2012 07 24.

There is more to come.  This story will continue over the next few weeks and the whole world will know whether I was right or not.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I don’t want to give anything away because this story will continue over the next few weeks.  It was definitely an educational and enjoyable experience that I’m glad to share.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I’m guessing that you accurately predicted the failure.  I’m not an engineer, but you certainly made this understandable enough to read at my level.  Best wishes as you go for Level II!!

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 12.

Very interesting! I’m sure you will be right on.

By Norm Watts on 2012 07 12.

Thanks for the differentation of RedBuilt products.  I forwarded to two customers who wanted to know more about RedForm I joists vs. the “look alikes.”

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 25.

It is great to be a part of the legacy.  Thank you for sharing some perspective on what you are seeing both large-scale in the economy, and how the RedBuilt/legacy Trus Joist business has weathered storms in the past.

By Jeff Jack on 2012 06 23.

I like the blog and appreciate the wisdom in your words.  The focus on thriving vs. surviving is an inspiring shift of perspective.  Not easy, but RedBuilt will thrive without a doubt.  If it were easy everyone would be doing it.  RedBuilt has created a toe hold and a beginning.  Carry on.

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 20.

Hey Kurt -
I enjoyed reading this post about the old Tj and dealing with the last great recession.  I still remember those “PBL” days, wondering as a new hire if I would walk into work one day and find out that I didn’t have a job.  Fortunately that never happened, and I enjoyed the heck out of working for a great company like Trus Joist.
You guys at RedBuilt have got the old Tj culture and believe me, that will help drive your success.  All the best!
- Chris

By Chris Meyer on 2012 06 19.

Thanks Duane!  It certainly can be confusing.

By pdrace on 2012 06 16.

Great article, Paul. Nice job of laying it all out!

By Duane Bolt on 2012 06 15.

What I was impressed by was the load demand against the LVL iJoists while working in a residential market. Ya’ll make good stuff.

By Max Stanford on 2012 06 12.

back to blog

RedBuilt's story - and its history - told in the Business Insider

Posted on May 07, 2013 by RedBuilt


On the cover of today's Business Insider -- the weekly business publication from the Idaho Statesman -- was a feature story about RedBuilt™. Idaho Statesman Front Page - May 7, 2013 Harold That story, which was also prominently featured on the Statesman's front page, tells the story of our history, from the company's inception in 1960 through today. It highlights our founders' role in creating engineered wood products, which was an entirely new category of materials at the time, that "still dominate much of the world’s light-commercial and wood-framed residential construction." In addition to the historical perspective, the article also demonstrates how today we're much more than just a building materials company. Kurt Liebich, President and CEO was quoted:

“We’ve got to be there just when the idea [of a new building project] is beginning to happen,” Liebich says. “We need to sit down with the architects to convince them that they should be thinking about a wood building versus a steel building. "Once they decide it’s a wood building, we’re in there working with the structural engineer. After all that upfront effort, we’re hoping to have a set of plans that specifies RedBuilt products. We do sell products, but we think about our business more as providing solutions for customer projects."
You can read the entire article on the Idaho Statesman's website, or see a PDF of the print version on our site.


Leave a Reply

Did you notice that on page 4 we are showing table fabrication at our Stayton, OR facility? If so, you have a good eye and you probably work at Stayton! But fabrication looks about the same in Delaware.

By Cornelia Sprung on 2015 04 27.

I am interested in finding out more about RedBuild open web floor joist for residential.

For the past 15 years we have desiign our floors for L480 (even with dimensioal lumber) We pour 10’ basement walls, use TJI’s and end up boxing around mechanicals and spendind to much time and money firestopping and drafrstopping for the new IRC and IBC. Were can I get more info on RedBiuld Open web Joist

By Rolling Rock Construction Co on 2014 07 03.

Not sure why but I found your closing line hilarious. Probably because it’s corny, however it’s probably true as well! Good to know everything went well in the process. Shoppers will definitely be happy Im sure!

By Angela - Chicago Garage Builders on 2013 10 10.

Fantastic win against Scotland. Absalotely great. I curled against your Dad. was a wonderful man. I grew up on the farm where Art and Aggie now live. We have retired to Athabasca an d winter in Mesa, Az. watch all the. Curling to keep cool. best wishes at the Olympics next year. continue success .  Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 03.

Thank you for your support Mr. Ruddick. Team USA and RedBuilt are very appreciative.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Thanks Henry,

I am from Perryvale, my Dad was Ernie Lehto. Would have been great if he could have been here to watch. One tough end against both Sweden and Canada yesterday, but we will bounce back today.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Congratulations on being part of the worlds curling. Are you from the lehto family and which one from perryvale . Very best of luck. We are curling fans and watch all the games. Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 01.

A dedicated redbuilt blog reader.. Thanks for the curling coverage. Congratulations Darren and go team USA.

By bill ruddick on 2013 03 31.

Here is Heinz Mueller’s response:

You are correct, Renaldo. This application would show up more in a commercial structure vs. a residential structure. For an application such as this, I would think a moisture sealant applied to the glulam material would help alleviate the potential issues. That being said, if you decided to go that route you would probably want to start weighing the cost/benefit ratio for using additional products/services (sealant & application) vs. using similar products (LVL, I-joist blocking, etc.) for the blocking/rim board in the floor/roof system. I hope that helps. Thank you for the question and for your interest in the RedBuilt blogs! Heinz

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Here is a great reply that was posted to RedBuilt’s Linked In page:

Renaldo Montenegro, I am going to assume that using Glulams for blocking is more suited for a commercial application rather than a residential application. Thus, the Glulams carrying a very large vertical load from above. In a residential use I would see this as an over kill. Yes, I agree on the moisture content of the Glulams shrinking. Would a moisture sealant applied on the Glulams’ work in this case? A very good article! Thanks for sharing.

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Great to to hear this!!!

By Renaldo Montenegro on 2012 10 17.

Epically informative.  I learned a lot.

By Greg Riley on 2012 10 12.

[...] Posted on October 10, 2012 by [...]

By Deeper is Cheaper | RedBuilt Blog | Michael T. Dai on 2012 10 10.

[...] Call your local representative for a no cost consultation.  Read part 1 here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? (Part 2) | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 18.

[...] Read Part 2 of this article here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 17.

Great article Tom.  Not to intrude, but I would like to expand on how the Redbuilt Design Centers can help the engineer of record.  When I say help, I really mean increase the EOR’s profits while specifying a safer structural roof/floor system.  As I think back to my time as a specifying engineer, specifying Redbuilt’s Open Web trusses saved me time (I can go on about the differences between Redbuilt’s Pin Connected Open Web trusses and plated trusses but that is for another time).  When an EOR saves time, they in essence increase profits.

How does Redbuilt save an EOR time (great question)?  We do all the gravity calculations and truss connections for every loading aspect of a roof/floor system.  All the EOR has to do is specify a truss depth, truss series, show all design loads required and maybe a connection detail or two (with or without the help of a Redbuilt technical representative).  Also, if the EOR requires a PE to stamp both the shop drawing and calculations, our internal designers and engineers will provide technical oversight and assurance that products are used as intended. 

Not only can we save an EOR time but we also provide some assurance and piece of mind.

By Guy Brousseau on 2012 08 23.

Interesting to read about what you are doing, Jason.

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 29.

Sorry for the late response.  I’m glad you have enjoyed the first two.  The third was posted this past week.  It was a fun experience.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 28.

I know that learning involves failure, so thank you for being humble enough to learn.
Thank you, too, for sharing.  I’m enjoying your journey.

By Kathy Bracisco on 2012 07 24.

There is more to come.  This story will continue over the next few weeks and the whole world will know whether I was right or not.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I don’t want to give anything away because this story will continue over the next few weeks.  It was definitely an educational and enjoyable experience that I’m glad to share.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I’m guessing that you accurately predicted the failure.  I’m not an engineer, but you certainly made this understandable enough to read at my level.  Best wishes as you go for Level II!!

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 12.

Very interesting! I’m sure you will be right on.

By Norm Watts on 2012 07 12.

Thanks for the differentation of RedBuilt products.  I forwarded to two customers who wanted to know more about RedForm I joists vs. the “look alikes.”

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 25.

It is great to be a part of the legacy.  Thank you for sharing some perspective on what you are seeing both large-scale in the economy, and how the RedBuilt/legacy Trus Joist business has weathered storms in the past.

By Jeff Jack on 2012 06 23.

I like the blog and appreciate the wisdom in your words.  The focus on thriving vs. surviving is an inspiring shift of perspective.  Not easy, but RedBuilt will thrive without a doubt.  If it were easy everyone would be doing it.  RedBuilt has created a toe hold and a beginning.  Carry on.

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 20.

Hey Kurt -
I enjoyed reading this post about the old Tj and dealing with the last great recession.  I still remember those “PBL” days, wondering as a new hire if I would walk into work one day and find out that I didn’t have a job.  Fortunately that never happened, and I enjoyed the heck out of working for a great company like Trus Joist.
You guys at RedBuilt have got the old Tj culture and believe me, that will help drive your success.  All the best!
- Chris

By Chris Meyer on 2012 06 19.

Thanks Duane!  It certainly can be confusing.

By pdrace on 2012 06 16.

Great article, Paul. Nice job of laying it all out!

By Duane Bolt on 2012 06 15.

What I was impressed by was the load demand against the LVL iJoists while working in a residential market. Ya’ll make good stuff.

By Max Stanford on 2012 06 12.

back to blog

What is the most technologically advanced building material used today?

Posted on April 09, 2013 by RedBuilt


Wood…that’s right, wood!Red-I 001 In addition to being a strong, light-weight building material, wood is the only traditional building material that is renewable.  It also sequesters carbon, helping keep greenhouse gases in check. Architect Michael Green, who is pioneering and promoting the use of wood for skyscrapers up to 30 stories tall, calls wood “the most technologically advanced building material in the world.” Green explained to Lloyd Alter with treehugger.com how “he wonders why sticking solar panels on the roof of a concrete or steel building are considered green when the actual building is made of materials that are not.” When Michael Green shared his love for wood with Ted.com, he explained that, “For the last century, tall buildings have been crafted of steel and concrete – but the greenhouse gas emissions of these materials are huge.  As Green notes, 3% of world’s energy goes into the making of steel and 5% goes into the making of concrete.  While most people think of transportation as the main villain when it comes to CO2 emissions, building is actually the true top offender – accounting for 47% of CO2 emissions.  When this is taken into consideration, the fact that Building with 1 cubic meter of wood stores 1 ton of CO2” makes a compelling argument for the use of wood. Green also talked about sustainable forestry and shares that, “enough wood is grown in North America every 13 minutes (to construct) a 20 story building.” The following formula is used to calculate a product’s carbon footprint: Manufacturing Carbon – Bio Fuel – Carbon Storage – Substitution = Total Carbon Footprint or Carbon Credit.

The University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture published the article, “Carbon Impacts Of Wood Products.”  When wood is burned for energy, the carbon footprint of the energy used is considered carbon neutral.  “The carbon dioxide released when this wood is burning was recently absorbed from the atmosphere by the growing tree during photosynthesis.”  “Carbon dioxide (CO2) is absorbed from the atmosphere during photosynthesis by the growing tree.  This carbon is converted to wood, bark and other parts of the tree, which are about ½ carbon by weight.  If the tree rots or burns, the solid carbon in the wood is released again to the atmosphere as carbon dioxide gas.  However, as long as a wood product is in service, it is keeping potential carbon dioxide gas out of the atmosphere.”  According to this article, an I-Joist that is 16’ long and 10” deep creates 70 carbon credits.Red_I_photo

Steel and concrete are strong and consistent building materials, but are high energy, non-renewable resources.  Companies like RedBuilt™ engineer wood to maximize utilization and strength of the material.  Engineered wood is strong, light-weight, energy efficient, and renewable – making it The Most Technologically Advanced Building Material used today.


Leave a Reply

Did you notice that on page 4 we are showing table fabrication at our Stayton, OR facility? If so, you have a good eye and you probably work at Stayton! But fabrication looks about the same in Delaware.

By Cornelia Sprung on 2015 04 27.

I am interested in finding out more about RedBuild open web floor joist for residential.

For the past 15 years we have desiign our floors for L480 (even with dimensioal lumber) We pour 10’ basement walls, use TJI’s and end up boxing around mechanicals and spendind to much time and money firestopping and drafrstopping for the new IRC and IBC. Were can I get more info on RedBiuld Open web Joist

By Rolling Rock Construction Co on 2014 07 03.

Not sure why but I found your closing line hilarious. Probably because it’s corny, however it’s probably true as well! Good to know everything went well in the process. Shoppers will definitely be happy Im sure!

By Angela - Chicago Garage Builders on 2013 10 10.

Fantastic win against Scotland. Absalotely great. I curled against your Dad. was a wonderful man. I grew up on the farm where Art and Aggie now live. We have retired to Athabasca an d winter in Mesa, Az. watch all the. Curling to keep cool. best wishes at the Olympics next year. continue success .  Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 03.

Thank you for your support Mr. Ruddick. Team USA and RedBuilt are very appreciative.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Thanks Henry,

I am from Perryvale, my Dad was Ernie Lehto. Would have been great if he could have been here to watch. One tough end against both Sweden and Canada yesterday, but we will bounce back today.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Congratulations on being part of the worlds curling. Are you from the lehto family and which one from perryvale . Very best of luck. We are curling fans and watch all the games. Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 01.

A dedicated redbuilt blog reader.. Thanks for the curling coverage. Congratulations Darren and go team USA.

By bill ruddick on 2013 03 31.

Here is Heinz Mueller’s response:

You are correct, Renaldo. This application would show up more in a commercial structure vs. a residential structure. For an application such as this, I would think a moisture sealant applied to the glulam material would help alleviate the potential issues. That being said, if you decided to go that route you would probably want to start weighing the cost/benefit ratio for using additional products/services (sealant & application) vs. using similar products (LVL, I-joist blocking, etc.) for the blocking/rim board in the floor/roof system. I hope that helps. Thank you for the question and for your interest in the RedBuilt blogs! Heinz

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Here is a great reply that was posted to RedBuilt’s Linked In page:

Renaldo Montenegro, I am going to assume that using Glulams for blocking is more suited for a commercial application rather than a residential application. Thus, the Glulams carrying a very large vertical load from above. In a residential use I would see this as an over kill. Yes, I agree on the moisture content of the Glulams shrinking. Would a moisture sealant applied on the Glulams’ work in this case? A very good article! Thanks for sharing.

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Great to to hear this!!!

By Renaldo Montenegro on 2012 10 17.

Epically informative.  I learned a lot.

By Greg Riley on 2012 10 12.

[...] Posted on October 10, 2012 by [...]

By Deeper is Cheaper | RedBuilt Blog | Michael T. Dai on 2012 10 10.

[...] Call your local representative for a no cost consultation.  Read part 1 here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? (Part 2) | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 18.

[...] Read Part 2 of this article here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 17.

Great article Tom.  Not to intrude, but I would like to expand on how the Redbuilt Design Centers can help the engineer of record.  When I say help, I really mean increase the EOR’s profits while specifying a safer structural roof/floor system.  As I think back to my time as a specifying engineer, specifying Redbuilt’s Open Web trusses saved me time (I can go on about the differences between Redbuilt’s Pin Connected Open Web trusses and plated trusses but that is for another time).  When an EOR saves time, they in essence increase profits.

How does Redbuilt save an EOR time (great question)?  We do all the gravity calculations and truss connections for every loading aspect of a roof/floor system.  All the EOR has to do is specify a truss depth, truss series, show all design loads required and maybe a connection detail or two (with or without the help of a Redbuilt technical representative).  Also, if the EOR requires a PE to stamp both the shop drawing and calculations, our internal designers and engineers will provide technical oversight and assurance that products are used as intended. 

Not only can we save an EOR time but we also provide some assurance and piece of mind.

By Guy Brousseau on 2012 08 23.

Interesting to read about what you are doing, Jason.

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 29.

Sorry for the late response.  I’m glad you have enjoyed the first two.  The third was posted this past week.  It was a fun experience.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 28.

I know that learning involves failure, so thank you for being humble enough to learn.
Thank you, too, for sharing.  I’m enjoying your journey.

By Kathy Bracisco on 2012 07 24.

There is more to come.  This story will continue over the next few weeks and the whole world will know whether I was right or not.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I don’t want to give anything away because this story will continue over the next few weeks.  It was definitely an educational and enjoyable experience that I’m glad to share.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I’m guessing that you accurately predicted the failure.  I’m not an engineer, but you certainly made this understandable enough to read at my level.  Best wishes as you go for Level II!!

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 12.

Very interesting! I’m sure you will be right on.

By Norm Watts on 2012 07 12.

Thanks for the differentation of RedBuilt products.  I forwarded to two customers who wanted to know more about RedForm I joists vs. the “look alikes.”

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 25.

It is great to be a part of the legacy.  Thank you for sharing some perspective on what you are seeing both large-scale in the economy, and how the RedBuilt/legacy Trus Joist business has weathered storms in the past.

By Jeff Jack on 2012 06 23.

I like the blog and appreciate the wisdom in your words.  The focus on thriving vs. surviving is an inspiring shift of perspective.  Not easy, but RedBuilt will thrive without a doubt.  If it were easy everyone would be doing it.  RedBuilt has created a toe hold and a beginning.  Carry on.

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 20.

Hey Kurt -
I enjoyed reading this post about the old Tj and dealing with the last great recession.  I still remember those “PBL” days, wondering as a new hire if I would walk into work one day and find out that I didn’t have a job.  Fortunately that never happened, and I enjoyed the heck out of working for a great company like Trus Joist.
You guys at RedBuilt have got the old Tj culture and believe me, that will help drive your success.  All the best!
- Chris

By Chris Meyer on 2012 06 19.

Thanks Duane!  It certainly can be confusing.

By pdrace on 2012 06 16.

Great article, Paul. Nice job of laying it all out!

By Duane Bolt on 2012 06 15.

What I was impressed by was the load demand against the LVL iJoists while working in a residential market. Ya’ll make good stuff.

By Max Stanford on 2012 06 12.

back to blog

In business and in sports, RedBuilt™ associate and competitive curler Darren Lehto has the golden ha

Posted on March 29, 2013 by RedBuilt


What does the sport of curling have in common with commercial construction? RedBuilt’s own Darren Lehto, for starters. Darren — who serves as RedBuilt’s Northwest Regional Sales Manager — is representing the United States at the 2013 World Men’s Curling Championships in Victoria, British Columbia, March 30-April 7. And Team Brady Clark (named after its “skip,” or captain) has already qualified for the 2014 United States Olympic Curling Trials this November in Fargo, N.D., where they’ll face four of the same squads they competed against in the 2013 USA Curling National Championships they won last month in Green Bay, Wis. Beyond that casual connection, Darren says there are several characteristics of world-class athletes that go hand in hand with succeeding in the highly competitive world of structural framing solutions. “High performance, unsurpassed support, and excellent teamwork are hallmarks of a great curling team and a great company,” he says. Like world-class athletes, RedBuilt™ products and the people who make and market them must consistently perform well under pressure. “You can’t just start playing and expect to win,” he says. “It takes a lot of practice to get things perfect, and RedBuilt™ has spent far more time pioneering engineered wood framing systems for commercial structures than our competitors.” Skilled, trustworthy support is critical, too. “In curling, the best shooters in the world are helpless without their skip, who calls the shots, or their sweepers, who brush the ice to control how far the stone travels and how much it curls,” Darren says. “Likewise, whatever our customers at RedBuilt™ demand, we’ll do it.” Darren Letho CurlingAnd whether you’re delivering structural framing solutions or curling stones, precision teamwork is paramount. “If you picked every team apart at the national championships, you’d find ones that have mastered specific skills better than we have, such as how to release the stones or sweep more effectively,” Darren says. “One thing that’s obvious about Team Brady Clark is that we work better as a unit than our opponents, which is definitely what earned us gold at the national championships this year. And the same can be said for RedBuilt™.” He says it starts by considering the customer as an integral part of the team and approaching each project from their mindset to minimize installed costs and make sure everything goes smoothly. “Like curling, selling engineered lumber isn’t rocket science,” he says. “It’s a matter of addressing all the subtle little details properly and anticipating what issues might hang you up. For instance, the design process for structural framing solutions can be complicated, so our sales team works hard up front to address any factors that might slow the engineering team down so that everything proceeds according to plan and we meet the delivery dates. Good communication is a big part of it, because poor communication often creates problems that didn’t even exist in the first place.” Darren’s been working for RedBuilt™ and our predecessor organizations since 1990. Active in the sport of curling for nearly three decades, the Canadian expatriate immigrated to the United States in 1996 when we moved him to Utah. He earned his U.S. citizenship two summers ago so he could participate in the USA Curling National Championships. Aside from its namesake, Darren is the most senior member of Team Brady Clark and plays second (throws the third and fourth rocks for the team). Darren played with Brady at the 2012 USA Curling National Championships, where their team finished fifth. This year at nationals the team was down by one point in the last end (like an inning in baseball), but they had “the hammer” — the final throw of the game, considered a huge advantage. They scored two points on the last throw, propelling them to the world championships where they’re seeking to secure the U.S. a slot at the 2014 Olympics in Sochi, Russia, Feb. 7-23. Darren and his teammates must place among the top seven or eight teams out of the 12 countries competing at the world championships to ensure the U.S. men’s team makes it into the Olympics. With a lower finish, they would have to compete at a qualifier in December in the hope of gaining one of two remaining Olympic berths. However, even if Team Brady Clark prevails in Victoria next week, there are no guarantees they’ll actually vie for a medal at Sochi next year; first they’ll have to attend the U.S. Olympic trials this November and defeat the four teams they bested this February at nationals. If this sounds confusing, then welcome to the underappreciated sport of curling. Regardless of the next week’s outcome, Darren’s teammates at RedBuilt™ couldn’t be prouder of his performance both on and off the ice. As evidenced by all the local media attention Team Brady Clark has garnered, their hometown of Seattle concurs. All of us at RedBuilt™ wish Darren and Team USA great success as the World Men’s Curling Championships kick off this Saturday. TSN, Canada’s national sports network, will air Team USA’s game against Canada this Monday night. Fans elsewhere can follow Team USA at the Men's World Championship in Victoria both online and on television. We’ll be eagerly following their progress as they go for the gold and posting updates on RedBuilt’s™ Facebook page. Please join us in rooting for the best in the sport.


Leave a Reply

Did you notice that on page 4 we are showing table fabrication at our Stayton, OR facility? If so, you have a good eye and you probably work at Stayton! But fabrication looks about the same in Delaware.

By Cornelia Sprung on 2015 04 27.

I am interested in finding out more about RedBuild open web floor joist for residential.

For the past 15 years we have desiign our floors for L480 (even with dimensioal lumber) We pour 10’ basement walls, use TJI’s and end up boxing around mechanicals and spendind to much time and money firestopping and drafrstopping for the new IRC and IBC. Were can I get more info on RedBiuld Open web Joist

By Rolling Rock Construction Co on 2014 07 03.

Not sure why but I found your closing line hilarious. Probably because it’s corny, however it’s probably true as well! Good to know everything went well in the process. Shoppers will definitely be happy Im sure!

By Angela - Chicago Garage Builders on 2013 10 10.

Fantastic win against Scotland. Absalotely great. I curled against your Dad. was a wonderful man. I grew up on the farm where Art and Aggie now live. We have retired to Athabasca an d winter in Mesa, Az. watch all the. Curling to keep cool. best wishes at the Olympics next year. continue success .  Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 03.

Thank you for your support Mr. Ruddick. Team USA and RedBuilt are very appreciative.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Thanks Henry,

I am from Perryvale, my Dad was Ernie Lehto. Would have been great if he could have been here to watch. One tough end against both Sweden and Canada yesterday, but we will bounce back today.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Congratulations on being part of the worlds curling. Are you from the lehto family and which one from perryvale . Very best of luck. We are curling fans and watch all the games. Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 01.

A dedicated redbuilt blog reader.. Thanks for the curling coverage. Congratulations Darren and go team USA.

By bill ruddick on 2013 03 31.

Here is Heinz Mueller’s response:

You are correct, Renaldo. This application would show up more in a commercial structure vs. a residential structure. For an application such as this, I would think a moisture sealant applied to the glulam material would help alleviate the potential issues. That being said, if you decided to go that route you would probably want to start weighing the cost/benefit ratio for using additional products/services (sealant & application) vs. using similar products (LVL, I-joist blocking, etc.) for the blocking/rim board in the floor/roof system. I hope that helps. Thank you for the question and for your interest in the RedBuilt blogs! Heinz

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Here is a great reply that was posted to RedBuilt’s Linked In page:

Renaldo Montenegro, I am going to assume that using Glulams for blocking is more suited for a commercial application rather than a residential application. Thus, the Glulams carrying a very large vertical load from above. In a residential use I would see this as an over kill. Yes, I agree on the moisture content of the Glulams shrinking. Would a moisture sealant applied on the Glulams’ work in this case? A very good article! Thanks for sharing.

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Great to to hear this!!!

By Renaldo Montenegro on 2012 10 17.

Epically informative.  I learned a lot.

By Greg Riley on 2012 10 12.

[...] Posted on October 10, 2012 by [...]

By Deeper is Cheaper | RedBuilt Blog | Michael T. Dai on 2012 10 10.

[...] Call your local representative for a no cost consultation.  Read part 1 here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? (Part 2) | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 18.

[...] Read Part 2 of this article here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 17.

Great article Tom.  Not to intrude, but I would like to expand on how the Redbuilt Design Centers can help the engineer of record.  When I say help, I really mean increase the EOR’s profits while specifying a safer structural roof/floor system.  As I think back to my time as a specifying engineer, specifying Redbuilt’s Open Web trusses saved me time (I can go on about the differences between Redbuilt’s Pin Connected Open Web trusses and plated trusses but that is for another time).  When an EOR saves time, they in essence increase profits.

How does Redbuilt save an EOR time (great question)?  We do all the gravity calculations and truss connections for every loading aspect of a roof/floor system.  All the EOR has to do is specify a truss depth, truss series, show all design loads required and maybe a connection detail or two (with or without the help of a Redbuilt technical representative).  Also, if the EOR requires a PE to stamp both the shop drawing and calculations, our internal designers and engineers will provide technical oversight and assurance that products are used as intended. 

Not only can we save an EOR time but we also provide some assurance and piece of mind.

By Guy Brousseau on 2012 08 23.

Interesting to read about what you are doing, Jason.

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 29.

Sorry for the late response.  I’m glad you have enjoyed the first two.  The third was posted this past week.  It was a fun experience.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 28.

I know that learning involves failure, so thank you for being humble enough to learn.
Thank you, too, for sharing.  I’m enjoying your journey.

By Kathy Bracisco on 2012 07 24.

There is more to come.  This story will continue over the next few weeks and the whole world will know whether I was right or not.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I don’t want to give anything away because this story will continue over the next few weeks.  It was definitely an educational and enjoyable experience that I’m glad to share.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I’m guessing that you accurately predicted the failure.  I’m not an engineer, but you certainly made this understandable enough to read at my level.  Best wishes as you go for Level II!!

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 12.

Very interesting! I’m sure you will be right on.

By Norm Watts on 2012 07 12.

Thanks for the differentation of RedBuilt products.  I forwarded to two customers who wanted to know more about RedForm I joists vs. the “look alikes.”

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 25.

It is great to be a part of the legacy.  Thank you for sharing some perspective on what you are seeing both large-scale in the economy, and how the RedBuilt/legacy Trus Joist business has weathered storms in the past.

By Jeff Jack on 2012 06 23.

I like the blog and appreciate the wisdom in your words.  The focus on thriving vs. surviving is an inspiring shift of perspective.  Not easy, but RedBuilt will thrive without a doubt.  If it were easy everyone would be doing it.  RedBuilt has created a toe hold and a beginning.  Carry on.

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 20.

Hey Kurt -
I enjoyed reading this post about the old Tj and dealing with the last great recession.  I still remember those “PBL” days, wondering as a new hire if I would walk into work one day and find out that I didn’t have a job.  Fortunately that never happened, and I enjoyed the heck out of working for a great company like Trus Joist.
You guys at RedBuilt have got the old Tj culture and believe me, that will help drive your success.  All the best!
- Chris

By Chris Meyer on 2012 06 19.

Thanks Duane!  It certainly can be confusing.

By pdrace on 2012 06 16.

Great article, Paul. Nice job of laying it all out!

By Duane Bolt on 2012 06 15.

What I was impressed by was the load demand against the LVL iJoists while working in a residential market. Ya’ll make good stuff.

By Max Stanford on 2012 06 12.

back to blog

Featured Project: Las Vegas Cyclery - Getting the Look, Going Green

Posted on March 28, 2013 by RedBuilt


In 2008, bicycle enthusiast Jared Fisher dreamed of owning a bike shop that could power itself and generate almost no waste. At the end of 2012, his dream became a reality. Last December, Fisher opened Las Vegas Cyclery, a two-story, 9,793 square-foot bicycle shop at The Gardens Summerlin South Village in Las Vegas. Located on one acre, Las Vegas Cyclery is housed in a net-zero, Platinum LEED certified building that runs at 103% energy capacity (produces 3% more power than it is expected to consume in the next year!). In 2008, Fisher began meeting with Wade Takashima, the Henderson-based chief architect at TWC Construction and chief executive officer of Creative FIT, about developing a net-zero building. Eventually engineer Todd Goshorn of Henderson’s TG Engineering got involved, as well as Jose Martinez, Sr., president of Pepe Construction, the Las Vegas-based company that served as framer for the project. TWC selected RedBuilt™ to assist with the creation of Las Vegas Cyclery because of its ability to offer environmentally friendly trusses that could achieve the look they wanted. For the ceiling, Fisher and Takashima asked for an exposed finish with a raw feel, and they liked the combination of wood and metal. The solution? Red-L™ and Red-W™ open-web trusses that met both the aesthetics and helped contribute to the building’s Platinum LEED certification. RedBuilt™ open web trusses are eco-friendly because they help minimize jobsite waste, and the wood products come from renewable sources and are free of urea formaldehydes. In addition, the steel components contain 23% post-consumer recycled content and 7.3% post-industrial recycled content. “The decision to use the open-web trusses from RedBuilt was essential to the overall open structure design concept,” says Takashima. “The trusses worked perfectly and contributed a nice harmony of wood and steel with the other structural elements of metal decking and glulams. Plus, they helped us achieve LEED points for recycled content and regional materials.” Overall, the entire Las Vegas Cyclery project achieved 30% recycled content and 92% regional materials, he says. So far, Las Vegas Cyclery has caught the attention of many newspapers and magazines, including Bicycle Retailer, which called the building “a functioning model of ultra-green retailing and energy efficiency.” According to the Las Vegas Review-Journal, Las Vegas Cyclery is “state-of-the-art” and a “shrine to energy efficiency.” Every day, shoppers at Las Vegas Cyclery admire the store’s earth-friendly resources, which include 208 solar panels, a wind turbine, recycling stations, solar-tube lighting systems, a bike-wash station that collects and filters water for continued use, and waterless urinals in the men’s restroom. “A lot of thought went into every part of this building,” says RedBuilt™ representative Gary Collinsworth. “All parties involved, from framer to engineer, hope the design and achievement of Las Vegas Cyclery will send a message to the community that everyone has a responsibility to take care of the environment.” Jennifer Turchin of the Las Vegas-based Sellen Sustainability, who served as the building’s LEED consultant, says the shop is likely the first net-zero building in the Las Vegas Valley, and Fisher believes it’s the first net-zero bike store in the country. Las Vegas has always been known for bright neon colors like red, pink and yellow. If Fisher has his way, it will soon be known for being green too. Read about Las Vegas Cyclery in the news: Las Vegas Cyclery takes green retail to extreme - Bicycle Retailer Las Vegas Cyclery's design, systems make it 'net-zero' site - Las Vegas Review-Journal LEEDing the Way - Vegas Seven Summerlin Bike Shop Sheds Light on Energy Efficiency - Prudential Americana Group Blog


Leave a Reply

Did you notice that on page 4 we are showing table fabrication at our Stayton, OR facility? If so, you have a good eye and you probably work at Stayton! But fabrication looks about the same in Delaware.

By Cornelia Sprung on 2015 04 27.

I am interested in finding out more about RedBuild open web floor joist for residential.

For the past 15 years we have desiign our floors for L480 (even with dimensioal lumber) We pour 10’ basement walls, use TJI’s and end up boxing around mechanicals and spendind to much time and money firestopping and drafrstopping for the new IRC and IBC. Were can I get more info on RedBiuld Open web Joist

By Rolling Rock Construction Co on 2014 07 03.

Not sure why but I found your closing line hilarious. Probably because it’s corny, however it’s probably true as well! Good to know everything went well in the process. Shoppers will definitely be happy Im sure!

By Angela - Chicago Garage Builders on 2013 10 10.

Fantastic win against Scotland. Absalotely great. I curled against your Dad. was a wonderful man. I grew up on the farm where Art and Aggie now live. We have retired to Athabasca an d winter in Mesa, Az. watch all the. Curling to keep cool. best wishes at the Olympics next year. continue success .  Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 03.

Thank you for your support Mr. Ruddick. Team USA and RedBuilt are very appreciative.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Thanks Henry,

I am from Perryvale, my Dad was Ernie Lehto. Would have been great if he could have been here to watch. One tough end against both Sweden and Canada yesterday, but we will bounce back today.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Congratulations on being part of the worlds curling. Are you from the lehto family and which one from perryvale . Very best of luck. We are curling fans and watch all the games. Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 01.

A dedicated redbuilt blog reader.. Thanks for the curling coverage. Congratulations Darren and go team USA.

By bill ruddick on 2013 03 31.

Here is Heinz Mueller’s response:

You are correct, Renaldo. This application would show up more in a commercial structure vs. a residential structure. For an application such as this, I would think a moisture sealant applied to the glulam material would help alleviate the potential issues. That being said, if you decided to go that route you would probably want to start weighing the cost/benefit ratio for using additional products/services (sealant & application) vs. using similar products (LVL, I-joist blocking, etc.) for the blocking/rim board in the floor/roof system. I hope that helps. Thank you for the question and for your interest in the RedBuilt blogs! Heinz

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Here is a great reply that was posted to RedBuilt’s Linked In page:

Renaldo Montenegro, I am going to assume that using Glulams for blocking is more suited for a commercial application rather than a residential application. Thus, the Glulams carrying a very large vertical load from above. In a residential use I would see this as an over kill. Yes, I agree on the moisture content of the Glulams shrinking. Would a moisture sealant applied on the Glulams’ work in this case? A very good article! Thanks for sharing.

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Great to to hear this!!!

By Renaldo Montenegro on 2012 10 17.

Epically informative.  I learned a lot.

By Greg Riley on 2012 10 12.

[...] Posted on October 10, 2012 by [...]

By Deeper is Cheaper | RedBuilt Blog | Michael T. Dai on 2012 10 10.

[...] Call your local representative for a no cost consultation.  Read part 1 here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? (Part 2) | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 18.

[...] Read Part 2 of this article here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 17.

Great article Tom.  Not to intrude, but I would like to expand on how the Redbuilt Design Centers can help the engineer of record.  When I say help, I really mean increase the EOR’s profits while specifying a safer structural roof/floor system.  As I think back to my time as a specifying engineer, specifying Redbuilt’s Open Web trusses saved me time (I can go on about the differences between Redbuilt’s Pin Connected Open Web trusses and plated trusses but that is for another time).  When an EOR saves time, they in essence increase profits.

How does Redbuilt save an EOR time (great question)?  We do all the gravity calculations and truss connections for every loading aspect of a roof/floor system.  All the EOR has to do is specify a truss depth, truss series, show all design loads required and maybe a connection detail or two (with or without the help of a Redbuilt technical representative).  Also, if the EOR requires a PE to stamp both the shop drawing and calculations, our internal designers and engineers will provide technical oversight and assurance that products are used as intended. 

Not only can we save an EOR time but we also provide some assurance and piece of mind.

By Guy Brousseau on 2012 08 23.

Interesting to read about what you are doing, Jason.

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 29.

Sorry for the late response.  I’m glad you have enjoyed the first two.  The third was posted this past week.  It was a fun experience.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 28.

I know that learning involves failure, so thank you for being humble enough to learn.
Thank you, too, for sharing.  I’m enjoying your journey.

By Kathy Bracisco on 2012 07 24.

There is more to come.  This story will continue over the next few weeks and the whole world will know whether I was right or not.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I don’t want to give anything away because this story will continue over the next few weeks.  It was definitely an educational and enjoyable experience that I’m glad to share.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I’m guessing that you accurately predicted the failure.  I’m not an engineer, but you certainly made this understandable enough to read at my level.  Best wishes as you go for Level II!!

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 12.

Very interesting! I’m sure you will be right on.

By Norm Watts on 2012 07 12.

Thanks for the differentation of RedBuilt products.  I forwarded to two customers who wanted to know more about RedForm I joists vs. the “look alikes.”

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 25.

It is great to be a part of the legacy.  Thank you for sharing some perspective on what you are seeing both large-scale in the economy, and how the RedBuilt/legacy Trus Joist business has weathered storms in the past.

By Jeff Jack on 2012 06 23.

I like the blog and appreciate the wisdom in your words.  The focus on thriving vs. surviving is an inspiring shift of perspective.  Not easy, but RedBuilt will thrive without a doubt.  If it were easy everyone would be doing it.  RedBuilt has created a toe hold and a beginning.  Carry on.

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 20.

Hey Kurt -
I enjoyed reading this post about the old Tj and dealing with the last great recession.  I still remember those “PBL” days, wondering as a new hire if I would walk into work one day and find out that I didn’t have a job.  Fortunately that never happened, and I enjoyed the heck out of working for a great company like Trus Joist.
You guys at RedBuilt have got the old Tj culture and believe me, that will help drive your success.  All the best!
- Chris

By Chris Meyer on 2012 06 19.

Thanks Duane!  It certainly can be confusing.

By pdrace on 2012 06 16.

Great article, Paul. Nice job of laying it all out!

By Duane Bolt on 2012 06 15.

What I was impressed by was the load demand against the LVL iJoists while working in a residential market. Ya’ll make good stuff.

By Max Stanford on 2012 06 12.

back to blog

Growing Pains for the Lumber Industry

Posted on March 19, 2013 by RedBuilt


As the U.S. housing market starts to grow, the lumber industry is feeling certain growing pains.  Finding talented labor from Lumberjacks to finish carpenters, and everything in between, is a struggle.  When the housing market crashed in 2008, many lumber plants closed their doors.  This affected a wide range of people like Ms. Stutzman who told the Wall Street Journal, “If the mills aren’t cutting logs, our trucks don’t run.”  Many people who lost their job didn’t sit around waiting for the lumber industry to recover…they simply couldn’t afford to.  So, workers went to places like North Dakota where there was work.  The problem facing the industry today is trying to replace all of the human talent that left the lumber industry.  New employees have a higher risk of being injured on the job and are less efficient than seasoned workers creating trying times for the entire industry. The exciting part will come when the industry “re-growth” matures and the “re-growing” pains subside.  Jim Carlton explained in the Wall Street Journal that saw mills and lumber companies across America will be opening soon creating hundreds of jobs.  New plants will be able to start and companies that made it through the storm, like RedBuilt, will be standing tall.


Leave a Reply

Did you notice that on page 4 we are showing table fabrication at our Stayton, OR facility? If so, you have a good eye and you probably work at Stayton! But fabrication looks about the same in Delaware.

By Cornelia Sprung on 2015 04 27.

I am interested in finding out more about RedBuild open web floor joist for residential.

For the past 15 years we have desiign our floors for L480 (even with dimensioal lumber) We pour 10’ basement walls, use TJI’s and end up boxing around mechanicals and spendind to much time and money firestopping and drafrstopping for the new IRC and IBC. Were can I get more info on RedBiuld Open web Joist

By Rolling Rock Construction Co on 2014 07 03.

Not sure why but I found your closing line hilarious. Probably because it’s corny, however it’s probably true as well! Good to know everything went well in the process. Shoppers will definitely be happy Im sure!

By Angela - Chicago Garage Builders on 2013 10 10.

Fantastic win against Scotland. Absalotely great. I curled against your Dad. was a wonderful man. I grew up on the farm where Art and Aggie now live. We have retired to Athabasca an d winter in Mesa, Az. watch all the. Curling to keep cool. best wishes at the Olympics next year. continue success .  Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 03.

Thank you for your support Mr. Ruddick. Team USA and RedBuilt are very appreciative.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Thanks Henry,

I am from Perryvale, my Dad was Ernie Lehto. Would have been great if he could have been here to watch. One tough end against both Sweden and Canada yesterday, but we will bounce back today.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Congratulations on being part of the worlds curling. Are you from the lehto family and which one from perryvale . Very best of luck. We are curling fans and watch all the games. Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 01.

A dedicated redbuilt blog reader.. Thanks for the curling coverage. Congratulations Darren and go team USA.

By bill ruddick on 2013 03 31.

Here is Heinz Mueller’s response:

You are correct, Renaldo. This application would show up more in a commercial structure vs. a residential structure. For an application such as this, I would think a moisture sealant applied to the glulam material would help alleviate the potential issues. That being said, if you decided to go that route you would probably want to start weighing the cost/benefit ratio for using additional products/services (sealant & application) vs. using similar products (LVL, I-joist blocking, etc.) for the blocking/rim board in the floor/roof system. I hope that helps. Thank you for the question and for your interest in the RedBuilt blogs! Heinz

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Here is a great reply that was posted to RedBuilt’s Linked In page:

Renaldo Montenegro, I am going to assume that using Glulams for blocking is more suited for a commercial application rather than a residential application. Thus, the Glulams carrying a very large vertical load from above. In a residential use I would see this as an over kill. Yes, I agree on the moisture content of the Glulams shrinking. Would a moisture sealant applied on the Glulams’ work in this case? A very good article! Thanks for sharing.

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Great to to hear this!!!

By Renaldo Montenegro on 2012 10 17.

Epically informative.  I learned a lot.

By Greg Riley on 2012 10 12.

[...] Posted on October 10, 2012 by [...]

By Deeper is Cheaper | RedBuilt Blog | Michael T. Dai on 2012 10 10.

[...] Call your local representative for a no cost consultation.  Read part 1 here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? (Part 2) | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 18.

[...] Read Part 2 of this article here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 17.

Great article Tom.  Not to intrude, but I would like to expand on how the Redbuilt Design Centers can help the engineer of record.  When I say help, I really mean increase the EOR’s profits while specifying a safer structural roof/floor system.  As I think back to my time as a specifying engineer, specifying Redbuilt’s Open Web trusses saved me time (I can go on about the differences between Redbuilt’s Pin Connected Open Web trusses and plated trusses but that is for another time).  When an EOR saves time, they in essence increase profits.

How does Redbuilt save an EOR time (great question)?  We do all the gravity calculations and truss connections for every loading aspect of a roof/floor system.  All the EOR has to do is specify a truss depth, truss series, show all design loads required and maybe a connection detail or two (with or without the help of a Redbuilt technical representative).  Also, if the EOR requires a PE to stamp both the shop drawing and calculations, our internal designers and engineers will provide technical oversight and assurance that products are used as intended. 

Not only can we save an EOR time but we also provide some assurance and piece of mind.

By Guy Brousseau on 2012 08 23.

Interesting to read about what you are doing, Jason.

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 29.

Sorry for the late response.  I’m glad you have enjoyed the first two.  The third was posted this past week.  It was a fun experience.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 28.

I know that learning involves failure, so thank you for being humble enough to learn.
Thank you, too, for sharing.  I’m enjoying your journey.

By Kathy Bracisco on 2012 07 24.

There is more to come.  This story will continue over the next few weeks and the whole world will know whether I was right or not.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I don’t want to give anything away because this story will continue over the next few weeks.  It was definitely an educational and enjoyable experience that I’m glad to share.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I’m guessing that you accurately predicted the failure.  I’m not an engineer, but you certainly made this understandable enough to read at my level.  Best wishes as you go for Level II!!

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 12.

Very interesting! I’m sure you will be right on.

By Norm Watts on 2012 07 12.

Thanks for the differentation of RedBuilt products.  I forwarded to two customers who wanted to know more about RedForm I joists vs. the “look alikes.”

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 25.

It is great to be a part of the legacy.  Thank you for sharing some perspective on what you are seeing both large-scale in the economy, and how the RedBuilt/legacy Trus Joist business has weathered storms in the past.

By Jeff Jack on 2012 06 23.

I like the blog and appreciate the wisdom in your words.  The focus on thriving vs. surviving is an inspiring shift of perspective.  Not easy, but RedBuilt will thrive without a doubt.  If it were easy everyone would be doing it.  RedBuilt has created a toe hold and a beginning.  Carry on.

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 20.

Hey Kurt -
I enjoyed reading this post about the old Tj and dealing with the last great recession.  I still remember those “PBL” days, wondering as a new hire if I would walk into work one day and find out that I didn’t have a job.  Fortunately that never happened, and I enjoyed the heck out of working for a great company like Trus Joist.
You guys at RedBuilt have got the old Tj culture and believe me, that will help drive your success.  All the best!
- Chris

By Chris Meyer on 2012 06 19.

Thanks Duane!  It certainly can be confusing.

By pdrace on 2012 06 16.

Great article, Paul. Nice job of laying it all out!

By Duane Bolt on 2012 06 15.

What I was impressed by was the load demand against the LVL iJoists while working in a residential market. Ya’ll make good stuff.

By Max Stanford on 2012 06 12.

back to blog

We're famous…  We've been published!

Posted on March 05, 2013 by RedBuilt


Jamie Morgan from Construction-Today Magazine interviewed our very own, Ted Osterberger, and wrote an overview article about RedBuilt™. Read and share this article to see how RedBuilt™ partners with architects, engineers and contractors to provide complete structural packages.  See what someone else has to say about our wide range of products including the Red-I™ I-Joist, Open-Web Truss, RedLam™ LVL, Forming, Shoring and Scaffold Plank.  Understand how the support of RedBuilt™ can simplify the complex construction process. Read the article today! If after reading the article, you would like to learn more about the Gilbert Park project, please visit our RedBuilt™ Project Profile Page.


Leave a Reply

Did you notice that on page 4 we are showing table fabrication at our Stayton, OR facility? If so, you have a good eye and you probably work at Stayton! But fabrication looks about the same in Delaware.

By Cornelia Sprung on 2015 04 27.

I am interested in finding out more about RedBuild open web floor joist for residential.

For the past 15 years we have desiign our floors for L480 (even with dimensioal lumber) We pour 10’ basement walls, use TJI’s and end up boxing around mechanicals and spendind to much time and money firestopping and drafrstopping for the new IRC and IBC. Were can I get more info on RedBiuld Open web Joist

By Rolling Rock Construction Co on 2014 07 03.

Not sure why but I found your closing line hilarious. Probably because it’s corny, however it’s probably true as well! Good to know everything went well in the process. Shoppers will definitely be happy Im sure!

By Angela - Chicago Garage Builders on 2013 10 10.

Fantastic win against Scotland. Absalotely great. I curled against your Dad. was a wonderful man. I grew up on the farm where Art and Aggie now live. We have retired to Athabasca an d winter in Mesa, Az. watch all the. Curling to keep cool. best wishes at the Olympics next year. continue success .  Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 03.

Thank you for your support Mr. Ruddick. Team USA and RedBuilt are very appreciative.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Thanks Henry,

I am from Perryvale, my Dad was Ernie Lehto. Would have been great if he could have been here to watch. One tough end against both Sweden and Canada yesterday, but we will bounce back today.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Congratulations on being part of the worlds curling. Are you from the lehto family and which one from perryvale . Very best of luck. We are curling fans and watch all the games. Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 01.

A dedicated redbuilt blog reader.. Thanks for the curling coverage. Congratulations Darren and go team USA.

By bill ruddick on 2013 03 31.

Here is Heinz Mueller’s response:

You are correct, Renaldo. This application would show up more in a commercial structure vs. a residential structure. For an application such as this, I would think a moisture sealant applied to the glulam material would help alleviate the potential issues. That being said, if you decided to go that route you would probably want to start weighing the cost/benefit ratio for using additional products/services (sealant & application) vs. using similar products (LVL, I-joist blocking, etc.) for the blocking/rim board in the floor/roof system. I hope that helps. Thank you for the question and for your interest in the RedBuilt blogs! Heinz

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Here is a great reply that was posted to RedBuilt’s Linked In page:

Renaldo Montenegro, I am going to assume that using Glulams for blocking is more suited for a commercial application rather than a residential application. Thus, the Glulams carrying a very large vertical load from above. In a residential use I would see this as an over kill. Yes, I agree on the moisture content of the Glulams shrinking. Would a moisture sealant applied on the Glulams’ work in this case? A very good article! Thanks for sharing.

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Great to to hear this!!!

By Renaldo Montenegro on 2012 10 17.

Epically informative.  I learned a lot.

By Greg Riley on 2012 10 12.

[...] Posted on October 10, 2012 by [...]

By Deeper is Cheaper | RedBuilt Blog | Michael T. Dai on 2012 10 10.

[...] Call your local representative for a no cost consultation.  Read part 1 here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? (Part 2) | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 18.

[...] Read Part 2 of this article here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 17.

Great article Tom.  Not to intrude, but I would like to expand on how the Redbuilt Design Centers can help the engineer of record.  When I say help, I really mean increase the EOR’s profits while specifying a safer structural roof/floor system.  As I think back to my time as a specifying engineer, specifying Redbuilt’s Open Web trusses saved me time (I can go on about the differences between Redbuilt’s Pin Connected Open Web trusses and plated trusses but that is for another time).  When an EOR saves time, they in essence increase profits.

How does Redbuilt save an EOR time (great question)?  We do all the gravity calculations and truss connections for every loading aspect of a roof/floor system.  All the EOR has to do is specify a truss depth, truss series, show all design loads required and maybe a connection detail or two (with or without the help of a Redbuilt technical representative).  Also, if the EOR requires a PE to stamp both the shop drawing and calculations, our internal designers and engineers will provide technical oversight and assurance that products are used as intended. 

Not only can we save an EOR time but we also provide some assurance and piece of mind.

By Guy Brousseau on 2012 08 23.

Interesting to read about what you are doing, Jason.

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 29.

Sorry for the late response.  I’m glad you have enjoyed the first two.  The third was posted this past week.  It was a fun experience.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 28.

I know that learning involves failure, so thank you for being humble enough to learn.
Thank you, too, for sharing.  I’m enjoying your journey.

By Kathy Bracisco on 2012 07 24.

There is more to come.  This story will continue over the next few weeks and the whole world will know whether I was right or not.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I don’t want to give anything away because this story will continue over the next few weeks.  It was definitely an educational and enjoyable experience that I’m glad to share.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I’m guessing that you accurately predicted the failure.  I’m not an engineer, but you certainly made this understandable enough to read at my level.  Best wishes as you go for Level II!!

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 12.

Very interesting! I’m sure you will be right on.

By Norm Watts on 2012 07 12.

Thanks for the differentation of RedBuilt products.  I forwarded to two customers who wanted to know more about RedForm I joists vs. the “look alikes.”

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 25.

It is great to be a part of the legacy.  Thank you for sharing some perspective on what you are seeing both large-scale in the economy, and how the RedBuilt/legacy Trus Joist business has weathered storms in the past.

By Jeff Jack on 2012 06 23.

I like the blog and appreciate the wisdom in your words.  The focus on thriving vs. surviving is an inspiring shift of perspective.  Not easy, but RedBuilt will thrive without a doubt.  If it were easy everyone would be doing it.  RedBuilt has created a toe hold and a beginning.  Carry on.

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 20.

Hey Kurt -
I enjoyed reading this post about the old Tj and dealing with the last great recession.  I still remember those “PBL” days, wondering as a new hire if I would walk into work one day and find out that I didn’t have a job.  Fortunately that never happened, and I enjoyed the heck out of working for a great company like Trus Joist.
You guys at RedBuilt have got the old Tj culture and believe me, that will help drive your success.  All the best!
- Chris

By Chris Meyer on 2012 06 19.

Thanks Duane!  It certainly can be confusing.

By pdrace on 2012 06 16.

Great article, Paul. Nice job of laying it all out!

By Duane Bolt on 2012 06 15.

What I was impressed by was the load demand against the LVL iJoists while working in a residential market. Ya’ll make good stuff.

By Max Stanford on 2012 06 12.

back to blog

TOP 3 REASONS WHY LUMBER PRICES ARE ON THE RISE

Posted on January 08, 2013 by RedBuilt


Pine_forest_in_Estonia In the last three months, lumber prices have risen to an eight-year high. The Wall Street Journal stated that prices of lumber for January delivery on the Chicago Mercantile Exchange (CME) reached their highest trading level since April 2005. “Prices have climbed nearly 40% since late September.” Three of the main factors for this increase include the increase in Chinese buying, recovery of the U.S. housing market, and the limitations of supply. Chinese Buying Increases BCBusiness explains that China’s demand for lumber picked up when the U.S. new housing market slowed down. “China surpassed the U.S. as the B.C. forest industry’s number one customer in May 2011.” Strong Signs for U.S. Housing “The Commerce Department reported new-home sales for November rose 4.4% from October to the highest level in more than two years.” New-home sales are expected to rise quickly to a stable growth. Decline in Supply When the U.S. housing market crashed, many lumber mills were taken out of production. The demand for lumber is increasing faster than production capabilities can supply. Additionally, throughout the last ten years several million acres of timber across the U.S. and Canada have been destroyed by the mountain pine beetle. Lumber mills in Canada have been able to salvage some of the beetle infested timber, but not enough to really dampen the loss. What Now? There are two main thoughts of what will happen to lumber prices. Some believe that lumber prices are going to rise quickly until production facilities catch up. Once production facilities are running at full capacity, it will cause an excess of supply and crash prices. The more popular opinion is that prices will continue to rise quickly for the next few months. Once prices are back to normal, price increases will follow a steady growth pattern.

 RB Timeline

 


Leave a Reply

Did you notice that on page 4 we are showing table fabrication at our Stayton, OR facility? If so, you have a good eye and you probably work at Stayton! But fabrication looks about the same in Delaware.

By Cornelia Sprung on 2015 04 27.

I am interested in finding out more about RedBuild open web floor joist for residential.

For the past 15 years we have desiign our floors for L480 (even with dimensioal lumber) We pour 10’ basement walls, use TJI’s and end up boxing around mechanicals and spendind to much time and money firestopping and drafrstopping for the new IRC and IBC. Were can I get more info on RedBiuld Open web Joist

By Rolling Rock Construction Co on 2014 07 03.

Not sure why but I found your closing line hilarious. Probably because it’s corny, however it’s probably true as well! Good to know everything went well in the process. Shoppers will definitely be happy Im sure!

By Angela - Chicago Garage Builders on 2013 10 10.

Fantastic win against Scotland. Absalotely great. I curled against your Dad. was a wonderful man. I grew up on the farm where Art and Aggie now live. We have retired to Athabasca an d winter in Mesa, Az. watch all the. Curling to keep cool. best wishes at the Olympics next year. continue success .  Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 03.

Thank you for your support Mr. Ruddick. Team USA and RedBuilt are very appreciative.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Thanks Henry,

I am from Perryvale, my Dad was Ernie Lehto. Would have been great if he could have been here to watch. One tough end against both Sweden and Canada yesterday, but we will bounce back today.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Congratulations on being part of the worlds curling. Are you from the lehto family and which one from perryvale . Very best of luck. We are curling fans and watch all the games. Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 01.

A dedicated redbuilt blog reader.. Thanks for the curling coverage. Congratulations Darren and go team USA.

By bill ruddick on 2013 03 31.

Here is Heinz Mueller’s response:

You are correct, Renaldo. This application would show up more in a commercial structure vs. a residential structure. For an application such as this, I would think a moisture sealant applied to the glulam material would help alleviate the potential issues. That being said, if you decided to go that route you would probably want to start weighing the cost/benefit ratio for using additional products/services (sealant & application) vs. using similar products (LVL, I-joist blocking, etc.) for the blocking/rim board in the floor/roof system. I hope that helps. Thank you for the question and for your interest in the RedBuilt blogs! Heinz

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Here is a great reply that was posted to RedBuilt’s Linked In page:

Renaldo Montenegro, I am going to assume that using Glulams for blocking is more suited for a commercial application rather than a residential application. Thus, the Glulams carrying a very large vertical load from above. In a residential use I would see this as an over kill. Yes, I agree on the moisture content of the Glulams shrinking. Would a moisture sealant applied on the Glulams’ work in this case? A very good article! Thanks for sharing.

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Great to to hear this!!!

By Renaldo Montenegro on 2012 10 17.

Epically informative.  I learned a lot.

By Greg Riley on 2012 10 12.

[...] Posted on October 10, 2012 by [...]

By Deeper is Cheaper | RedBuilt Blog | Michael T. Dai on 2012 10 10.

[...] Call your local representative for a no cost consultation.  Read part 1 here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? (Part 2) | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 18.

[...] Read Part 2 of this article here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 17.

Great article Tom.  Not to intrude, but I would like to expand on how the Redbuilt Design Centers can help the engineer of record.  When I say help, I really mean increase the EOR’s profits while specifying a safer structural roof/floor system.  As I think back to my time as a specifying engineer, specifying Redbuilt’s Open Web trusses saved me time (I can go on about the differences between Redbuilt’s Pin Connected Open Web trusses and plated trusses but that is for another time).  When an EOR saves time, they in essence increase profits.

How does Redbuilt save an EOR time (great question)?  We do all the gravity calculations and truss connections for every loading aspect of a roof/floor system.  All the EOR has to do is specify a truss depth, truss series, show all design loads required and maybe a connection detail or two (with or without the help of a Redbuilt technical representative).  Also, if the EOR requires a PE to stamp both the shop drawing and calculations, our internal designers and engineers will provide technical oversight and assurance that products are used as intended. 

Not only can we save an EOR time but we also provide some assurance and piece of mind.

By Guy Brousseau on 2012 08 23.

Interesting to read about what you are doing, Jason.

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 29.

Sorry for the late response.  I’m glad you have enjoyed the first two.  The third was posted this past week.  It was a fun experience.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 28.

I know that learning involves failure, so thank you for being humble enough to learn.
Thank you, too, for sharing.  I’m enjoying your journey.

By Kathy Bracisco on 2012 07 24.

There is more to come.  This story will continue over the next few weeks and the whole world will know whether I was right or not.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I don’t want to give anything away because this story will continue over the next few weeks.  It was definitely an educational and enjoyable experience that I’m glad to share.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I’m guessing that you accurately predicted the failure.  I’m not an engineer, but you certainly made this understandable enough to read at my level.  Best wishes as you go for Level II!!

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 12.

Very interesting! I’m sure you will be right on.

By Norm Watts on 2012 07 12.

Thanks for the differentation of RedBuilt products.  I forwarded to two customers who wanted to know more about RedForm I joists vs. the “look alikes.”

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 25.

It is great to be a part of the legacy.  Thank you for sharing some perspective on what you are seeing both large-scale in the economy, and how the RedBuilt/legacy Trus Joist business has weathered storms in the past.

By Jeff Jack on 2012 06 23.

I like the blog and appreciate the wisdom in your words.  The focus on thriving vs. surviving is an inspiring shift of perspective.  Not easy, but RedBuilt will thrive without a doubt.  If it were easy everyone would be doing it.  RedBuilt has created a toe hold and a beginning.  Carry on.

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 20.

Hey Kurt -
I enjoyed reading this post about the old Tj and dealing with the last great recession.  I still remember those “PBL” days, wondering as a new hire if I would walk into work one day and find out that I didn’t have a job.  Fortunately that never happened, and I enjoyed the heck out of working for a great company like Trus Joist.
You guys at RedBuilt have got the old Tj culture and believe me, that will help drive your success.  All the best!
- Chris

By Chris Meyer on 2012 06 19.

Thanks Duane!  It certainly can be confusing.

By pdrace on 2012 06 16.

Great article, Paul. Nice job of laying it all out!

By Duane Bolt on 2012 06 15.

What I was impressed by was the load demand against the LVL iJoists while working in a residential market. Ya’ll make good stuff.

By Max Stanford on 2012 06 12.

back to blog

How RedBuilt™ Products Will Be Affected by California’s Product Assessment Charge on Lumber?

Posted on January 02, 2013 by RedBuilt


I-Joist shadow According to the state of California’s Board of Equalization, “Beginning January 1, 2013, purchases of lumber products and engineered wood products for use in California will be subject to a one percent (1%) Assessment based on the selling price of products.” How does this law affect RedBuilt’s California Customers? “As a consumer of lumber products or engineered wood products, construction contractors will be required to pay the assessment to their California vendors.” “As a consumer of lumber products or engineered wood products, construction contractors will be required to pay the assessment directly to the BOE on purchases made from outside of California for use in California.” What does this mean for RedBuilt™? The State Board of Equalization states that under the new law, “retailers selling lumber products and engineered wood products to California consumers must charge and collect the 1% lumber products assessment from their customers and report and pay the assessment to the Board of Equalization.” “However, wood products that have been manufactured, assembled, processed, or produced from primary wood products are not subject to the 1% assessment. These include “secondary” wood products where there has been additional labor that adds significant value to the product.” Based on the definitions provided by the State Board of Equalization, it appears that RedBuilt™ Open-Web Trusses are not eligible for the 1% assessment, but the BOE has communicated to us that Red-I™ I-Joists and RedLam™ LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber) are eligible - as are all of the “little pieces of wood” we provide as accessories. For more information, visit the California State Board of Equalization website. What are your thoughts regarding LPA? Please comment…    


Leave a Reply

Did you notice that on page 4 we are showing table fabrication at our Stayton, OR facility? If so, you have a good eye and you probably work at Stayton! But fabrication looks about the same in Delaware.

By Cornelia Sprung on 2015 04 27.

I am interested in finding out more about RedBuild open web floor joist for residential.

For the past 15 years we have desiign our floors for L480 (even with dimensioal lumber) We pour 10’ basement walls, use TJI’s and end up boxing around mechanicals and spendind to much time and money firestopping and drafrstopping for the new IRC and IBC. Were can I get more info on RedBiuld Open web Joist

By Rolling Rock Construction Co on 2014 07 03.

Not sure why but I found your closing line hilarious. Probably because it’s corny, however it’s probably true as well! Good to know everything went well in the process. Shoppers will definitely be happy Im sure!

By Angela - Chicago Garage Builders on 2013 10 10.

Fantastic win against Scotland. Absalotely great. I curled against your Dad. was a wonderful man. I grew up on the farm where Art and Aggie now live. We have retired to Athabasca an d winter in Mesa, Az. watch all the. Curling to keep cool. best wishes at the Olympics next year. continue success .  Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 03.

Thank you for your support Mr. Ruddick. Team USA and RedBuilt are very appreciative.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Thanks Henry,

I am from Perryvale, my Dad was Ernie Lehto. Would have been great if he could have been here to watch. One tough end against both Sweden and Canada yesterday, but we will bounce back today.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Congratulations on being part of the worlds curling. Are you from the lehto family and which one from perryvale . Very best of luck. We are curling fans and watch all the games. Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 01.

A dedicated redbuilt blog reader.. Thanks for the curling coverage. Congratulations Darren and go team USA.

By bill ruddick on 2013 03 31.

Here is Heinz Mueller’s response:

You are correct, Renaldo. This application would show up more in a commercial structure vs. a residential structure. For an application such as this, I would think a moisture sealant applied to the glulam material would help alleviate the potential issues. That being said, if you decided to go that route you would probably want to start weighing the cost/benefit ratio for using additional products/services (sealant & application) vs. using similar products (LVL, I-joist blocking, etc.) for the blocking/rim board in the floor/roof system. I hope that helps. Thank you for the question and for your interest in the RedBuilt blogs! Heinz

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Here is a great reply that was posted to RedBuilt’s Linked In page:

Renaldo Montenegro, I am going to assume that using Glulams for blocking is more suited for a commercial application rather than a residential application. Thus, the Glulams carrying a very large vertical load from above. In a residential use I would see this as an over kill. Yes, I agree on the moisture content of the Glulams shrinking. Would a moisture sealant applied on the Glulams’ work in this case? A very good article! Thanks for sharing.

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Great to to hear this!!!

By Renaldo Montenegro on 2012 10 17.

Epically informative.  I learned a lot.

By Greg Riley on 2012 10 12.

[...] Posted on October 10, 2012 by [...]

By Deeper is Cheaper | RedBuilt Blog | Michael T. Dai on 2012 10 10.

[...] Call your local representative for a no cost consultation.  Read part 1 here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? (Part 2) | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 18.

[...] Read Part 2 of this article here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 17.

Great article Tom.  Not to intrude, but I would like to expand on how the Redbuilt Design Centers can help the engineer of record.  When I say help, I really mean increase the EOR’s profits while specifying a safer structural roof/floor system.  As I think back to my time as a specifying engineer, specifying Redbuilt’s Open Web trusses saved me time (I can go on about the differences between Redbuilt’s Pin Connected Open Web trusses and plated trusses but that is for another time).  When an EOR saves time, they in essence increase profits.

How does Redbuilt save an EOR time (great question)?  We do all the gravity calculations and truss connections for every loading aspect of a roof/floor system.  All the EOR has to do is specify a truss depth, truss series, show all design loads required and maybe a connection detail or two (with or without the help of a Redbuilt technical representative).  Also, if the EOR requires a PE to stamp both the shop drawing and calculations, our internal designers and engineers will provide technical oversight and assurance that products are used as intended. 

Not only can we save an EOR time but we also provide some assurance and piece of mind.

By Guy Brousseau on 2012 08 23.

Interesting to read about what you are doing, Jason.

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 29.

Sorry for the late response.  I’m glad you have enjoyed the first two.  The third was posted this past week.  It was a fun experience.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 28.

I know that learning involves failure, so thank you for being humble enough to learn.
Thank you, too, for sharing.  I’m enjoying your journey.

By Kathy Bracisco on 2012 07 24.

There is more to come.  This story will continue over the next few weeks and the whole world will know whether I was right or not.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I don’t want to give anything away because this story will continue over the next few weeks.  It was definitely an educational and enjoyable experience that I’m glad to share.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I’m guessing that you accurately predicted the failure.  I’m not an engineer, but you certainly made this understandable enough to read at my level.  Best wishes as you go for Level II!!

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 12.

Very interesting! I’m sure you will be right on.

By Norm Watts on 2012 07 12.

Thanks for the differentation of RedBuilt products.  I forwarded to two customers who wanted to know more about RedForm I joists vs. the “look alikes.”

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 25.

It is great to be a part of the legacy.  Thank you for sharing some perspective on what you are seeing both large-scale in the economy, and how the RedBuilt/legacy Trus Joist business has weathered storms in the past.

By Jeff Jack on 2012 06 23.

I like the blog and appreciate the wisdom in your words.  The focus on thriving vs. surviving is an inspiring shift of perspective.  Not easy, but RedBuilt will thrive without a doubt.  If it were easy everyone would be doing it.  RedBuilt has created a toe hold and a beginning.  Carry on.

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 20.

Hey Kurt -
I enjoyed reading this post about the old Tj and dealing with the last great recession.  I still remember those “PBL” days, wondering as a new hire if I would walk into work one day and find out that I didn’t have a job.  Fortunately that never happened, and I enjoyed the heck out of working for a great company like Trus Joist.
You guys at RedBuilt have got the old Tj culture and believe me, that will help drive your success.  All the best!
- Chris

By Chris Meyer on 2012 06 19.

Thanks Duane!  It certainly can be confusing.

By pdrace on 2012 06 16.

Great article, Paul. Nice job of laying it all out!

By Duane Bolt on 2012 06 15.

What I was impressed by was the load demand against the LVL iJoists while working in a residential market. Ya’ll make good stuff.

By Max Stanford on 2012 06 12.

back to blog

Featured Project, "Rising from the Ashes in Alberta"

Posted on December 11, 2012 by RedBuilt


RedBuilt's recent newsletter explains how a RedBuilt Technical Representative aided a church in Alberta, Canada after a tragic fire.  Read, "Rising from the Ashes in Alberta" for the full story.


Leave a Reply

Did you notice that on page 4 we are showing table fabrication at our Stayton, OR facility? If so, you have a good eye and you probably work at Stayton! But fabrication looks about the same in Delaware.

By Cornelia Sprung on 2015 04 27.

I am interested in finding out more about RedBuild open web floor joist for residential.

For the past 15 years we have desiign our floors for L480 (even with dimensioal lumber) We pour 10’ basement walls, use TJI’s and end up boxing around mechanicals and spendind to much time and money firestopping and drafrstopping for the new IRC and IBC. Were can I get more info on RedBiuld Open web Joist

By Rolling Rock Construction Co on 2014 07 03.

Not sure why but I found your closing line hilarious. Probably because it’s corny, however it’s probably true as well! Good to know everything went well in the process. Shoppers will definitely be happy Im sure!

By Angela - Chicago Garage Builders on 2013 10 10.

Fantastic win against Scotland. Absalotely great. I curled against your Dad. was a wonderful man. I grew up on the farm where Art and Aggie now live. We have retired to Athabasca an d winter in Mesa, Az. watch all the. Curling to keep cool. best wishes at the Olympics next year. continue success .  Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 03.

Thank you for your support Mr. Ruddick. Team USA and RedBuilt are very appreciative.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Thanks Henry,

I am from Perryvale, my Dad was Ernie Lehto. Would have been great if he could have been here to watch. One tough end against both Sweden and Canada yesterday, but we will bounce back today.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Congratulations on being part of the worlds curling. Are you from the lehto family and which one from perryvale . Very best of luck. We are curling fans and watch all the games. Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 01.

A dedicated redbuilt blog reader.. Thanks for the curling coverage. Congratulations Darren and go team USA.

By bill ruddick on 2013 03 31.

Here is Heinz Mueller’s response:

You are correct, Renaldo. This application would show up more in a commercial structure vs. a residential structure. For an application such as this, I would think a moisture sealant applied to the glulam material would help alleviate the potential issues. That being said, if you decided to go that route you would probably want to start weighing the cost/benefit ratio for using additional products/services (sealant & application) vs. using similar products (LVL, I-joist blocking, etc.) for the blocking/rim board in the floor/roof system. I hope that helps. Thank you for the question and for your interest in the RedBuilt blogs! Heinz

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Here is a great reply that was posted to RedBuilt’s Linked In page:

Renaldo Montenegro, I am going to assume that using Glulams for blocking is more suited for a commercial application rather than a residential application. Thus, the Glulams carrying a very large vertical load from above. In a residential use I would see this as an over kill. Yes, I agree on the moisture content of the Glulams shrinking. Would a moisture sealant applied on the Glulams’ work in this case? A very good article! Thanks for sharing.

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Great to to hear this!!!

By Renaldo Montenegro on 2012 10 17.

Epically informative.  I learned a lot.

By Greg Riley on 2012 10 12.

[...] Posted on October 10, 2012 by [...]

By Deeper is Cheaper | RedBuilt Blog | Michael T. Dai on 2012 10 10.

[...] Call your local representative for a no cost consultation.  Read part 1 here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? (Part 2) | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 18.

[...] Read Part 2 of this article here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 17.

Great article Tom.  Not to intrude, but I would like to expand on how the Redbuilt Design Centers can help the engineer of record.  When I say help, I really mean increase the EOR’s profits while specifying a safer structural roof/floor system.  As I think back to my time as a specifying engineer, specifying Redbuilt’s Open Web trusses saved me time (I can go on about the differences between Redbuilt’s Pin Connected Open Web trusses and plated trusses but that is for another time).  When an EOR saves time, they in essence increase profits.

How does Redbuilt save an EOR time (great question)?  We do all the gravity calculations and truss connections for every loading aspect of a roof/floor system.  All the EOR has to do is specify a truss depth, truss series, show all design loads required and maybe a connection detail or two (with or without the help of a Redbuilt technical representative).  Also, if the EOR requires a PE to stamp both the shop drawing and calculations, our internal designers and engineers will provide technical oversight and assurance that products are used as intended. 

Not only can we save an EOR time but we also provide some assurance and piece of mind.

By Guy Brousseau on 2012 08 23.

Interesting to read about what you are doing, Jason.

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 29.

Sorry for the late response.  I’m glad you have enjoyed the first two.  The third was posted this past week.  It was a fun experience.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 28.

I know that learning involves failure, so thank you for being humble enough to learn.
Thank you, too, for sharing.  I’m enjoying your journey.

By Kathy Bracisco on 2012 07 24.

There is more to come.  This story will continue over the next few weeks and the whole world will know whether I was right or not.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I don’t want to give anything away because this story will continue over the next few weeks.  It was definitely an educational and enjoyable experience that I’m glad to share.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I’m guessing that you accurately predicted the failure.  I’m not an engineer, but you certainly made this understandable enough to read at my level.  Best wishes as you go for Level II!!

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 12.

Very interesting! I’m sure you will be right on.

By Norm Watts on 2012 07 12.

Thanks for the differentation of RedBuilt products.  I forwarded to two customers who wanted to know more about RedForm I joists vs. the “look alikes.”

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 25.

It is great to be a part of the legacy.  Thank you for sharing some perspective on what you are seeing both large-scale in the economy, and how the RedBuilt/legacy Trus Joist business has weathered storms in the past.

By Jeff Jack on 2012 06 23.

I like the blog and appreciate the wisdom in your words.  The focus on thriving vs. surviving is an inspiring shift of perspective.  Not easy, but RedBuilt will thrive without a doubt.  If it were easy everyone would be doing it.  RedBuilt has created a toe hold and a beginning.  Carry on.

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 20.

Hey Kurt -
I enjoyed reading this post about the old Tj and dealing with the last great recession.  I still remember those “PBL” days, wondering as a new hire if I would walk into work one day and find out that I didn’t have a job.  Fortunately that never happened, and I enjoyed the heck out of working for a great company like Trus Joist.
You guys at RedBuilt have got the old Tj culture and believe me, that will help drive your success.  All the best!
- Chris

By Chris Meyer on 2012 06 19.

Thanks Duane!  It certainly can be confusing.

By pdrace on 2012 06 16.

Great article, Paul. Nice job of laying it all out!

By Duane Bolt on 2012 06 15.

What I was impressed by was the load demand against the LVL iJoists while working in a residential market. Ya’ll make good stuff.

By Max Stanford on 2012 06 12.

back to blog

Glue Laminated Lumber Blocking/Rim Board – Something To Think About

Posted on November 27, 2012 by RedBuilt


by Heinz Mueller, Design Center Leader (for RedBuilt’s Hillsboro office) and P.E. at RedBuilt™

When RedLam LVL is not viable, glue laminated lumber (glulam) is a wonderful option for use as large section main carrying members in structures. It is made of wood (a renewable resource) and is easy to design, just like RedLam LVL.

That being said, I have started seeing some applications with glulam material specified that I would encourage the design community to think about a bit more. The applications that can be of concern are blocking between joist members (prefabricated I-joists, open web trusses, or structural composite lumber) or continuous rim board at the ends of joist members; especially when there are load bearing and/or shear walls above.

Allow me to expand on this concern.

This blocking/rim board is the primary mechanism to transfer stacking vertical loads from above to the supporting structure below (more critical on floors then roofs). It is also the primary mechanism to transfer lateral loads from the diaphragm above to the supporting structure below. Because the joists are typically not designed to transfer the stacking vertical load at perpendicular bearing walls, the blocking/rim board is a pretty important part of the structural system.

Now to the part that causes concern. Differences in the type of lumber being used (dimensional in glulam; veneers in LVL and I-joist), as well as manufacturing processes, creates a potential for differences in moisture contents and dimensional changes between glulam and joists/LVL. In other words, if everything else were equal, glulam material can tend to shrink and joists/LVL can tend to swell.

Below are a couple of actual jobsite photos illustrating this potential issue of dimensional changes in glulam blocking/rim board in stacking walls and the negative affect it can have.

 

 

 

Because of this potential issue and the negative impacts it would have on building performance, RedBuilt discourages the use of glulam material for blocking/rim board in a pre-fabricated I-joist, open web truss, or LVL joist systems.


Leave a Reply

Did you notice that on page 4 we are showing table fabrication at our Stayton, OR facility? If so, you have a good eye and you probably work at Stayton! But fabrication looks about the same in Delaware.

By Cornelia Sprung on 2015 04 27.

I am interested in finding out more about RedBuild open web floor joist for residential.

For the past 15 years we have desiign our floors for L480 (even with dimensioal lumber) We pour 10’ basement walls, use TJI’s and end up boxing around mechanicals and spendind to much time and money firestopping and drafrstopping for the new IRC and IBC. Were can I get more info on RedBiuld Open web Joist

By Rolling Rock Construction Co on 2014 07 03.

Not sure why but I found your closing line hilarious. Probably because it’s corny, however it’s probably true as well! Good to know everything went well in the process. Shoppers will definitely be happy Im sure!

By Angela - Chicago Garage Builders on 2013 10 10.

Fantastic win against Scotland. Absalotely great. I curled against your Dad. was a wonderful man. I grew up on the farm where Art and Aggie now live. We have retired to Athabasca an d winter in Mesa, Az. watch all the. Curling to keep cool. best wishes at the Olympics next year. continue success .  Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 03.

Thank you for your support Mr. Ruddick. Team USA and RedBuilt are very appreciative.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Thanks Henry,

I am from Perryvale, my Dad was Ernie Lehto. Would have been great if he could have been here to watch. One tough end against both Sweden and Canada yesterday, but we will bounce back today.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Congratulations on being part of the worlds curling. Are you from the lehto family and which one from perryvale . Very best of luck. We are curling fans and watch all the games. Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 01.

A dedicated redbuilt blog reader.. Thanks for the curling coverage. Congratulations Darren and go team USA.

By bill ruddick on 2013 03 31.

Here is Heinz Mueller’s response:

You are correct, Renaldo. This application would show up more in a commercial structure vs. a residential structure. For an application such as this, I would think a moisture sealant applied to the glulam material would help alleviate the potential issues. That being said, if you decided to go that route you would probably want to start weighing the cost/benefit ratio for using additional products/services (sealant & application) vs. using similar products (LVL, I-joist blocking, etc.) for the blocking/rim board in the floor/roof system. I hope that helps. Thank you for the question and for your interest in the RedBuilt blogs! Heinz

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Here is a great reply that was posted to RedBuilt’s Linked In page:

Renaldo Montenegro, I am going to assume that using Glulams for blocking is more suited for a commercial application rather than a residential application. Thus, the Glulams carrying a very large vertical load from above. In a residential use I would see this as an over kill. Yes, I agree on the moisture content of the Glulams shrinking. Would a moisture sealant applied on the Glulams’ work in this case? A very good article! Thanks for sharing.

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Great to to hear this!!!

By Renaldo Montenegro on 2012 10 17.

Epically informative.  I learned a lot.

By Greg Riley on 2012 10 12.

[...] Posted on October 10, 2012 by [...]

By Deeper is Cheaper | RedBuilt Blog | Michael T. Dai on 2012 10 10.

[...] Call your local representative for a no cost consultation.  Read part 1 here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? (Part 2) | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 18.

[...] Read Part 2 of this article here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 17.

Great article Tom.  Not to intrude, but I would like to expand on how the Redbuilt Design Centers can help the engineer of record.  When I say help, I really mean increase the EOR’s profits while specifying a safer structural roof/floor system.  As I think back to my time as a specifying engineer, specifying Redbuilt’s Open Web trusses saved me time (I can go on about the differences between Redbuilt’s Pin Connected Open Web trusses and plated trusses but that is for another time).  When an EOR saves time, they in essence increase profits.

How does Redbuilt save an EOR time (great question)?  We do all the gravity calculations and truss connections for every loading aspect of a roof/floor system.  All the EOR has to do is specify a truss depth, truss series, show all design loads required and maybe a connection detail or two (with or without the help of a Redbuilt technical representative).  Also, if the EOR requires a PE to stamp both the shop drawing and calculations, our internal designers and engineers will provide technical oversight and assurance that products are used as intended. 

Not only can we save an EOR time but we also provide some assurance and piece of mind.

By Guy Brousseau on 2012 08 23.

Interesting to read about what you are doing, Jason.

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 29.

Sorry for the late response.  I’m glad you have enjoyed the first two.  The third was posted this past week.  It was a fun experience.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 28.

I know that learning involves failure, so thank you for being humble enough to learn.
Thank you, too, for sharing.  I’m enjoying your journey.

By Kathy Bracisco on 2012 07 24.

There is more to come.  This story will continue over the next few weeks and the whole world will know whether I was right or not.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I don’t want to give anything away because this story will continue over the next few weeks.  It was definitely an educational and enjoyable experience that I’m glad to share.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I’m guessing that you accurately predicted the failure.  I’m not an engineer, but you certainly made this understandable enough to read at my level.  Best wishes as you go for Level II!!

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 12.

Very interesting! I’m sure you will be right on.

By Norm Watts on 2012 07 12.

Thanks for the differentation of RedBuilt products.  I forwarded to two customers who wanted to know more about RedForm I joists vs. the “look alikes.”

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 25.

It is great to be a part of the legacy.  Thank you for sharing some perspective on what you are seeing both large-scale in the economy, and how the RedBuilt/legacy Trus Joist business has weathered storms in the past.

By Jeff Jack on 2012 06 23.

I like the blog and appreciate the wisdom in your words.  The focus on thriving vs. surviving is an inspiring shift of perspective.  Not easy, but RedBuilt will thrive without a doubt.  If it were easy everyone would be doing it.  RedBuilt has created a toe hold and a beginning.  Carry on.

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 20.

Hey Kurt -
I enjoyed reading this post about the old Tj and dealing with the last great recession.  I still remember those “PBL” days, wondering as a new hire if I would walk into work one day and find out that I didn’t have a job.  Fortunately that never happened, and I enjoyed the heck out of working for a great company like Trus Joist.
You guys at RedBuilt have got the old Tj culture and believe me, that will help drive your success.  All the best!
- Chris

By Chris Meyer on 2012 06 19.

Thanks Duane!  It certainly can be confusing.

By pdrace on 2012 06 16.

Great article, Paul. Nice job of laying it all out!

By Duane Bolt on 2012 06 15.

What I was impressed by was the load demand against the LVL iJoists while working in a residential market. Ya’ll make good stuff.

By Max Stanford on 2012 06 12.

back to blog

And the RedBuilt™ Photo Logo Contest Winner is…….

Posted on November 15, 2012 by RedBuilt


A few months ago, Ted Osterberger (Senior Vice President of Operations at RedBuilt) sent Kurt Liebich (C.E.O. at RedBuilt) a picture of himself rafting on a river but all you could see in the crashing waves was a baseball hat with a RedBuilt™ Logo. From that, Kurt decided he wanted something fun for RedBuilt associates to do so we created the RedBuilt Photo Logo Contest. The first place winner was decided by a panel of five associates from different segments of RedBuilt. That same panel also agreed on five pictures to go on Facebook for people to vote for the second place winner themselves! The first place winner was Dwaine Charbonneau with this picture: RedBuilt Open-Web Truss The second place winner as decided on Facebook is Jeff Jack with this picture: RedBuilt Drawing Thanks to all that participated!


Leave a Reply

Did you notice that on page 4 we are showing table fabrication at our Stayton, OR facility? If so, you have a good eye and you probably work at Stayton! But fabrication looks about the same in Delaware.

By Cornelia Sprung on 2015 04 27.

I am interested in finding out more about RedBuild open web floor joist for residential.

For the past 15 years we have desiign our floors for L480 (even with dimensioal lumber) We pour 10’ basement walls, use TJI’s and end up boxing around mechanicals and spendind to much time and money firestopping and drafrstopping for the new IRC and IBC. Were can I get more info on RedBiuld Open web Joist

By Rolling Rock Construction Co on 2014 07 03.

Not sure why but I found your closing line hilarious. Probably because it’s corny, however it’s probably true as well! Good to know everything went well in the process. Shoppers will definitely be happy Im sure!

By Angela - Chicago Garage Builders on 2013 10 10.

Fantastic win against Scotland. Absalotely great. I curled against your Dad. was a wonderful man. I grew up on the farm where Art and Aggie now live. We have retired to Athabasca an d winter in Mesa, Az. watch all the. Curling to keep cool. best wishes at the Olympics next year. continue success .  Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 03.

Thank you for your support Mr. Ruddick. Team USA and RedBuilt are very appreciative.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Thanks Henry,

I am from Perryvale, my Dad was Ernie Lehto. Would have been great if he could have been here to watch. One tough end against both Sweden and Canada yesterday, but we will bounce back today.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Congratulations on being part of the worlds curling. Are you from the lehto family and which one from perryvale . Very best of luck. We are curling fans and watch all the games. Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 01.

A dedicated redbuilt blog reader.. Thanks for the curling coverage. Congratulations Darren and go team USA.

By bill ruddick on 2013 03 31.

Here is Heinz Mueller’s response:

You are correct, Renaldo. This application would show up more in a commercial structure vs. a residential structure. For an application such as this, I would think a moisture sealant applied to the glulam material would help alleviate the potential issues. That being said, if you decided to go that route you would probably want to start weighing the cost/benefit ratio for using additional products/services (sealant & application) vs. using similar products (LVL, I-joist blocking, etc.) for the blocking/rim board in the floor/roof system. I hope that helps. Thank you for the question and for your interest in the RedBuilt blogs! Heinz

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Here is a great reply that was posted to RedBuilt’s Linked In page:

Renaldo Montenegro, I am going to assume that using Glulams for blocking is more suited for a commercial application rather than a residential application. Thus, the Glulams carrying a very large vertical load from above. In a residential use I would see this as an over kill. Yes, I agree on the moisture content of the Glulams shrinking. Would a moisture sealant applied on the Glulams’ work in this case? A very good article! Thanks for sharing.

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Great to to hear this!!!

By Renaldo Montenegro on 2012 10 17.

Epically informative.  I learned a lot.

By Greg Riley on 2012 10 12.

[...] Posted on October 10, 2012 by [...]

By Deeper is Cheaper | RedBuilt Blog | Michael T. Dai on 2012 10 10.

[...] Call your local representative for a no cost consultation.  Read part 1 here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? (Part 2) | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 18.

[...] Read Part 2 of this article here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 17.

Great article Tom.  Not to intrude, but I would like to expand on how the Redbuilt Design Centers can help the engineer of record.  When I say help, I really mean increase the EOR’s profits while specifying a safer structural roof/floor system.  As I think back to my time as a specifying engineer, specifying Redbuilt’s Open Web trusses saved me time (I can go on about the differences between Redbuilt’s Pin Connected Open Web trusses and plated trusses but that is for another time).  When an EOR saves time, they in essence increase profits.

How does Redbuilt save an EOR time (great question)?  We do all the gravity calculations and truss connections for every loading aspect of a roof/floor system.  All the EOR has to do is specify a truss depth, truss series, show all design loads required and maybe a connection detail or two (with or without the help of a Redbuilt technical representative).  Also, if the EOR requires a PE to stamp both the shop drawing and calculations, our internal designers and engineers will provide technical oversight and assurance that products are used as intended. 

Not only can we save an EOR time but we also provide some assurance and piece of mind.

By Guy Brousseau on 2012 08 23.

Interesting to read about what you are doing, Jason.

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 29.

Sorry for the late response.  I’m glad you have enjoyed the first two.  The third was posted this past week.  It was a fun experience.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 28.

I know that learning involves failure, so thank you for being humble enough to learn.
Thank you, too, for sharing.  I’m enjoying your journey.

By Kathy Bracisco on 2012 07 24.

There is more to come.  This story will continue over the next few weeks and the whole world will know whether I was right or not.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I don’t want to give anything away because this story will continue over the next few weeks.  It was definitely an educational and enjoyable experience that I’m glad to share.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I’m guessing that you accurately predicted the failure.  I’m not an engineer, but you certainly made this understandable enough to read at my level.  Best wishes as you go for Level II!!

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 12.

Very interesting! I’m sure you will be right on.

By Norm Watts on 2012 07 12.

Thanks for the differentation of RedBuilt products.  I forwarded to two customers who wanted to know more about RedForm I joists vs. the “look alikes.”

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 25.

It is great to be a part of the legacy.  Thank you for sharing some perspective on what you are seeing both large-scale in the economy, and how the RedBuilt/legacy Trus Joist business has weathered storms in the past.

By Jeff Jack on 2012 06 23.

I like the blog and appreciate the wisdom in your words.  The focus on thriving vs. surviving is an inspiring shift of perspective.  Not easy, but RedBuilt will thrive without a doubt.  If it were easy everyone would be doing it.  RedBuilt has created a toe hold and a beginning.  Carry on.

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 20.

Hey Kurt -
I enjoyed reading this post about the old Tj and dealing with the last great recession.  I still remember those “PBL” days, wondering as a new hire if I would walk into work one day and find out that I didn’t have a job.  Fortunately that never happened, and I enjoyed the heck out of working for a great company like Trus Joist.
You guys at RedBuilt have got the old Tj culture and believe me, that will help drive your success.  All the best!
- Chris

By Chris Meyer on 2012 06 19.

Thanks Duane!  It certainly can be confusing.

By pdrace on 2012 06 16.

Great article, Paul. Nice job of laying it all out!

By Duane Bolt on 2012 06 15.

What I was impressed by was the load demand against the LVL iJoists while working in a residential market. Ya’ll make good stuff.

By Max Stanford on 2012 06 12.

back to blog

Check Out Our New Open-Web Truss Video

Posted on November 13, 2012 by RedBuilt


Check out this video to gain an in depth grasp of what an open web truss really is.  With one of RedBuilt’s™ main products, dive into the material composition and see how these materials fit and work together.  In less than 5 minutes, you will have achieved an in depth overview of a key commercial product. To see the full video, Click Here.


Leave a Reply

Did you notice that on page 4 we are showing table fabrication at our Stayton, OR facility? If so, you have a good eye and you probably work at Stayton! But fabrication looks about the same in Delaware.

By Cornelia Sprung on 2015 04 27.

I am interested in finding out more about RedBuild open web floor joist for residential.

For the past 15 years we have desiign our floors for L480 (even with dimensioal lumber) We pour 10’ basement walls, use TJI’s and end up boxing around mechanicals and spendind to much time and money firestopping and drafrstopping for the new IRC and IBC. Were can I get more info on RedBiuld Open web Joist

By Rolling Rock Construction Co on 2014 07 03.

Not sure why but I found your closing line hilarious. Probably because it’s corny, however it’s probably true as well! Good to know everything went well in the process. Shoppers will definitely be happy Im sure!

By Angela - Chicago Garage Builders on 2013 10 10.

Fantastic win against Scotland. Absalotely great. I curled against your Dad. was a wonderful man. I grew up on the farm where Art and Aggie now live. We have retired to Athabasca an d winter in Mesa, Az. watch all the. Curling to keep cool. best wishes at the Olympics next year. continue success .  Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 03.

Thank you for your support Mr. Ruddick. Team USA and RedBuilt are very appreciative.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Thanks Henry,

I am from Perryvale, my Dad was Ernie Lehto. Would have been great if he could have been here to watch. One tough end against both Sweden and Canada yesterday, but we will bounce back today.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Congratulations on being part of the worlds curling. Are you from the lehto family and which one from perryvale . Very best of luck. We are curling fans and watch all the games. Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 01.

A dedicated redbuilt blog reader.. Thanks for the curling coverage. Congratulations Darren and go team USA.

By bill ruddick on 2013 03 31.

Here is Heinz Mueller’s response:

You are correct, Renaldo. This application would show up more in a commercial structure vs. a residential structure. For an application such as this, I would think a moisture sealant applied to the glulam material would help alleviate the potential issues. That being said, if you decided to go that route you would probably want to start weighing the cost/benefit ratio for using additional products/services (sealant & application) vs. using similar products (LVL, I-joist blocking, etc.) for the blocking/rim board in the floor/roof system. I hope that helps. Thank you for the question and for your interest in the RedBuilt blogs! Heinz

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Here is a great reply that was posted to RedBuilt’s Linked In page:

Renaldo Montenegro, I am going to assume that using Glulams for blocking is more suited for a commercial application rather than a residential application. Thus, the Glulams carrying a very large vertical load from above. In a residential use I would see this as an over kill. Yes, I agree on the moisture content of the Glulams shrinking. Would a moisture sealant applied on the Glulams’ work in this case? A very good article! Thanks for sharing.

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Great to to hear this!!!

By Renaldo Montenegro on 2012 10 17.

Epically informative.  I learned a lot.

By Greg Riley on 2012 10 12.

[...] Posted on October 10, 2012 by [...]

By Deeper is Cheaper | RedBuilt Blog | Michael T. Dai on 2012 10 10.

[...] Call your local representative for a no cost consultation.  Read part 1 here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? (Part 2) | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 18.

[...] Read Part 2 of this article here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 17.

Great article Tom.  Not to intrude, but I would like to expand on how the Redbuilt Design Centers can help the engineer of record.  When I say help, I really mean increase the EOR’s profits while specifying a safer structural roof/floor system.  As I think back to my time as a specifying engineer, specifying Redbuilt’s Open Web trusses saved me time (I can go on about the differences between Redbuilt’s Pin Connected Open Web trusses and plated trusses but that is for another time).  When an EOR saves time, they in essence increase profits.

How does Redbuilt save an EOR time (great question)?  We do all the gravity calculations and truss connections for every loading aspect of a roof/floor system.  All the EOR has to do is specify a truss depth, truss series, show all design loads required and maybe a connection detail or two (with or without the help of a Redbuilt technical representative).  Also, if the EOR requires a PE to stamp both the shop drawing and calculations, our internal designers and engineers will provide technical oversight and assurance that products are used as intended. 

Not only can we save an EOR time but we also provide some assurance and piece of mind.

By Guy Brousseau on 2012 08 23.

Interesting to read about what you are doing, Jason.

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 29.

Sorry for the late response.  I’m glad you have enjoyed the first two.  The third was posted this past week.  It was a fun experience.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 28.

I know that learning involves failure, so thank you for being humble enough to learn.
Thank you, too, for sharing.  I’m enjoying your journey.

By Kathy Bracisco on 2012 07 24.

There is more to come.  This story will continue over the next few weeks and the whole world will know whether I was right or not.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I don’t want to give anything away because this story will continue over the next few weeks.  It was definitely an educational and enjoyable experience that I’m glad to share.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I’m guessing that you accurately predicted the failure.  I’m not an engineer, but you certainly made this understandable enough to read at my level.  Best wishes as you go for Level II!!

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 12.

Very interesting! I’m sure you will be right on.

By Norm Watts on 2012 07 12.

Thanks for the differentation of RedBuilt products.  I forwarded to two customers who wanted to know more about RedForm I joists vs. the “look alikes.”

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 25.

It is great to be a part of the legacy.  Thank you for sharing some perspective on what you are seeing both large-scale in the economy, and how the RedBuilt/legacy Trus Joist business has weathered storms in the past.

By Jeff Jack on 2012 06 23.

I like the blog and appreciate the wisdom in your words.  The focus on thriving vs. surviving is an inspiring shift of perspective.  Not easy, but RedBuilt will thrive without a doubt.  If it were easy everyone would be doing it.  RedBuilt has created a toe hold and a beginning.  Carry on.

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 20.

Hey Kurt -
I enjoyed reading this post about the old Tj and dealing with the last great recession.  I still remember those “PBL” days, wondering as a new hire if I would walk into work one day and find out that I didn’t have a job.  Fortunately that never happened, and I enjoyed the heck out of working for a great company like Trus Joist.
You guys at RedBuilt have got the old Tj culture and believe me, that will help drive your success.  All the best!
- Chris

By Chris Meyer on 2012 06 19.

Thanks Duane!  It certainly can be confusing.

By pdrace on 2012 06 16.

Great article, Paul. Nice job of laying it all out!

By Duane Bolt on 2012 06 15.

What I was impressed by was the load demand against the LVL iJoists while working in a residential market. Ya’ll make good stuff.

By Max Stanford on 2012 06 12.

back to blog

We’ve updated our Literature!

Posted on November 06, 2012 by RedBuilt


by Paul Drace, Director of Marketing at RedBuilt™ Go to http://www.redbuilt.com/resources/literature.aspx to find our most up-to-date literature in easy to access PDF format.  We strongly urge you to become dependent on the electronic versions of literature primarily because if you use them, you will have the most current information.  We are continually refining and improving the information contained in our electronic versions making our printed versions out-of-date the second they are printed.  It is akin to the evolution of the horse and buggy (printed) to the automobile (electronic) in the beginning of the 20th century. The following is a summary of the changes that we made: Total Support:

  • Minor editorial and photo updates
Red-I™ Joists:
  • P. 2 – Added hyperlinks to the on-line version for the Table of Contents for convenience
  • P. 15 – Updated the loads for blocking panels in first bullet point
    • Added Red-I45™ and Red-I90H™ and adjusted allowable load for Red-I65™ and Red-I90™ from 1,925 to 2,255 lbs.
  • P. 17 – Updated the nail size in Detail 21 and adjusted the Nail Shear Capacity.
    • Nail Shear Capacity is decreased to correctly account for double shear reduction.
Red-OW:
  • P. 2 – Added hyperlinks to the on-line version for the Table of Contents for convenience
  • P. 3 – Added “with RedLam™ LVL chords” in second paragraph of Resource Efficiency to distinguish the type of trusses that are available with FSC credits.
  • P. 5 – Updated the tightest curvature for single-chord trusses to 52.’
  • Significant Change
  • P. 15 – Details 19, 20, & 21
  • P. 18 – Details 35 &36
  • P. 20 – Detail 44
    • Updated top chord extension and outrigger tables based on the code requirement to account for 300 lb point load at the end of the truss.
    • Updated the values for the materials used.
    • Updated the multiplier and notes.
    • Added the “live load = 0.80 x total load for LL deflection."
  • P. 21 – Detail 51: Eliminated the Double Truss Reaction for double chord double trusses because the trusses are modeled as single trusses.
  • P. 25 – Detail 59 has been updated to reflect the tested assembly with a 3.5”x3.5”x15” block and a max tension capacity of 3,500 lbs.
    • This as now our standard, tested assembly.
    • HD3B connectors are required.  Do NOT substitute other hold downs.
  • P. 26
    • Updated Detail 65 to reflect all double chord truss series
    • Updated Detail 66 to show actual clip with nailer.
Fire Facts:
  • P. 6 – Updated the 45 Minute assembly to NBCC 2010 requirements
Sprinkler System Installation Guide:
  • P. 3 – Added note about pre-drilling self tapping screws
Tapered Red-I65T™ Joists:
  • P. 2
    • Added hyperlinks to the on-line version for the Table of Contents
    • Removed the bullet point about knockout holes
      • Due to a different manufacturing process for tapered Red-I65T™ I-joists, knockout holes are not standard.
      • If holes are required, they can be independently drilled.  This service will incur additional charges.
  • P. 4 – Clarified the available depths based on slope.
  • Added note that knockout holes are not available.
As a side note, you may have to clear your cache to download the most recent version of our literature.  Do this by typing “Ctrl-F5.”


Leave a Reply

Did you notice that on page 4 we are showing table fabrication at our Stayton, OR facility? If so, you have a good eye and you probably work at Stayton! But fabrication looks about the same in Delaware.

By Cornelia Sprung on 2015 04 27.

I am interested in finding out more about RedBuild open web floor joist for residential.

For the past 15 years we have desiign our floors for L480 (even with dimensioal lumber) We pour 10’ basement walls, use TJI’s and end up boxing around mechanicals and spendind to much time and money firestopping and drafrstopping for the new IRC and IBC. Were can I get more info on RedBiuld Open web Joist

By Rolling Rock Construction Co on 2014 07 03.

Not sure why but I found your closing line hilarious. Probably because it’s corny, however it’s probably true as well! Good to know everything went well in the process. Shoppers will definitely be happy Im sure!

By Angela - Chicago Garage Builders on 2013 10 10.

Fantastic win against Scotland. Absalotely great. I curled against your Dad. was a wonderful man. I grew up on the farm where Art and Aggie now live. We have retired to Athabasca an d winter in Mesa, Az. watch all the. Curling to keep cool. best wishes at the Olympics next year. continue success .  Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 03.

Thank you for your support Mr. Ruddick. Team USA and RedBuilt are very appreciative.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Thanks Henry,

I am from Perryvale, my Dad was Ernie Lehto. Would have been great if he could have been here to watch. One tough end against both Sweden and Canada yesterday, but we will bounce back today.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Congratulations on being part of the worlds curling. Are you from the lehto family and which one from perryvale . Very best of luck. We are curling fans and watch all the games. Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 01.

A dedicated redbuilt blog reader.. Thanks for the curling coverage. Congratulations Darren and go team USA.

By bill ruddick on 2013 03 31.

Here is Heinz Mueller’s response:

You are correct, Renaldo. This application would show up more in a commercial structure vs. a residential structure. For an application such as this, I would think a moisture sealant applied to the glulam material would help alleviate the potential issues. That being said, if you decided to go that route you would probably want to start weighing the cost/benefit ratio for using additional products/services (sealant & application) vs. using similar products (LVL, I-joist blocking, etc.) for the blocking/rim board in the floor/roof system. I hope that helps. Thank you for the question and for your interest in the RedBuilt blogs! Heinz

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Here is a great reply that was posted to RedBuilt’s Linked In page:

Renaldo Montenegro, I am going to assume that using Glulams for blocking is more suited for a commercial application rather than a residential application. Thus, the Glulams carrying a very large vertical load from above. In a residential use I would see this as an over kill. Yes, I agree on the moisture content of the Glulams shrinking. Would a moisture sealant applied on the Glulams’ work in this case? A very good article! Thanks for sharing.

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Great to to hear this!!!

By Renaldo Montenegro on 2012 10 17.

Epically informative.  I learned a lot.

By Greg Riley on 2012 10 12.

[...] Posted on October 10, 2012 by [...]

By Deeper is Cheaper | RedBuilt Blog | Michael T. Dai on 2012 10 10.

[...] Call your local representative for a no cost consultation.  Read part 1 here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? (Part 2) | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 18.

[...] Read Part 2 of this article here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 17.

Great article Tom.  Not to intrude, but I would like to expand on how the Redbuilt Design Centers can help the engineer of record.  When I say help, I really mean increase the EOR’s profits while specifying a safer structural roof/floor system.  As I think back to my time as a specifying engineer, specifying Redbuilt’s Open Web trusses saved me time (I can go on about the differences between Redbuilt’s Pin Connected Open Web trusses and plated trusses but that is for another time).  When an EOR saves time, they in essence increase profits.

How does Redbuilt save an EOR time (great question)?  We do all the gravity calculations and truss connections for every loading aspect of a roof/floor system.  All the EOR has to do is specify a truss depth, truss series, show all design loads required and maybe a connection detail or two (with or without the help of a Redbuilt technical representative).  Also, if the EOR requires a PE to stamp both the shop drawing and calculations, our internal designers and engineers will provide technical oversight and assurance that products are used as intended. 

Not only can we save an EOR time but we also provide some assurance and piece of mind.

By Guy Brousseau on 2012 08 23.

Interesting to read about what you are doing, Jason.

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 29.

Sorry for the late response.  I’m glad you have enjoyed the first two.  The third was posted this past week.  It was a fun experience.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 28.

I know that learning involves failure, so thank you for being humble enough to learn.
Thank you, too, for sharing.  I’m enjoying your journey.

By Kathy Bracisco on 2012 07 24.

There is more to come.  This story will continue over the next few weeks and the whole world will know whether I was right or not.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I don’t want to give anything away because this story will continue over the next few weeks.  It was definitely an educational and enjoyable experience that I’m glad to share.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I’m guessing that you accurately predicted the failure.  I’m not an engineer, but you certainly made this understandable enough to read at my level.  Best wishes as you go for Level II!!

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 12.

Very interesting! I’m sure you will be right on.

By Norm Watts on 2012 07 12.

Thanks for the differentation of RedBuilt products.  I forwarded to two customers who wanted to know more about RedForm I joists vs. the “look alikes.”

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 25.

It is great to be a part of the legacy.  Thank you for sharing some perspective on what you are seeing both large-scale in the economy, and how the RedBuilt/legacy Trus Joist business has weathered storms in the past.

By Jeff Jack on 2012 06 23.

I like the blog and appreciate the wisdom in your words.  The focus on thriving vs. surviving is an inspiring shift of perspective.  Not easy, but RedBuilt will thrive without a doubt.  If it were easy everyone would be doing it.  RedBuilt has created a toe hold and a beginning.  Carry on.

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 20.

Hey Kurt -
I enjoyed reading this post about the old Tj and dealing with the last great recession.  I still remember those “PBL” days, wondering as a new hire if I would walk into work one day and find out that I didn’t have a job.  Fortunately that never happened, and I enjoyed the heck out of working for a great company like Trus Joist.
You guys at RedBuilt have got the old Tj culture and believe me, that will help drive your success.  All the best!
- Chris

By Chris Meyer on 2012 06 19.

Thanks Duane!  It certainly can be confusing.

By pdrace on 2012 06 16.

Great article, Paul. Nice job of laying it all out!

By Duane Bolt on 2012 06 15.

What I was impressed by was the load demand against the LVL iJoists while working in a residential market. Ya’ll make good stuff.

By Max Stanford on 2012 06 12.

back to blog

Housing Starts Hit 4-Year High in September

Posted on October 17, 2012 by RedBuilt


This article from USA Today reports that “builders started construction on single-family homes and apartments in September at the fastest pace since July 2008, a further indication that the housing recovery is strengthening.” (paragraph 1). It further proves its point with the following statistics:

  • “The Commerce Department says builders broke ground at a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 872,000 in September. That's an increase of 15% from August.” (paragraph 2).
  • “Applications for building permits, a sign of future construction, jumped nearly 12% to an annual rate of 894,000, also the highest since July 2008.” (paragraph 3).
  • “The strength in September came from both single-family construction, which rose 11%, and apartments, which increased 25.1%.” (paragraph 4).
  • “Construction activity is now 82.5% higher than the recession low in April 2009. Activity is still well below the roughly 1.5 million rate that is consistent with healthier markets.” (paragraph 5).
This article suggests that this improvement in housing starts is a direct result of “record-low mortgage rates” and it suggests that “the Federal Reserve's aggressive policies could push long-term interest rates even lower, making home-buying affordable for the foreseeable future.” (paragraph 8). While we think the “record-low mortgage rates” are certainly responsible for a portion of the 11% increase in single-family construction, we think this increase is also due to lower inventories as housing markets are starting to level out and in some cities, even rebound. This positive news is exciting to us at RedBuilt™ as we strive to thrive in this new economy… especially since residential construction activity is leading indicator of commercial construction opportunity. Read the full article here.


Leave a Reply

Did you notice that on page 4 we are showing table fabrication at our Stayton, OR facility? If so, you have a good eye and you probably work at Stayton! But fabrication looks about the same in Delaware.

By Cornelia Sprung on 2015 04 27.

I am interested in finding out more about RedBuild open web floor joist for residential.

For the past 15 years we have desiign our floors for L480 (even with dimensioal lumber) We pour 10’ basement walls, use TJI’s and end up boxing around mechanicals and spendind to much time and money firestopping and drafrstopping for the new IRC and IBC. Were can I get more info on RedBiuld Open web Joist

By Rolling Rock Construction Co on 2014 07 03.

Not sure why but I found your closing line hilarious. Probably because it’s corny, however it’s probably true as well! Good to know everything went well in the process. Shoppers will definitely be happy Im sure!

By Angela - Chicago Garage Builders on 2013 10 10.

Fantastic win against Scotland. Absalotely great. I curled against your Dad. was a wonderful man. I grew up on the farm where Art and Aggie now live. We have retired to Athabasca an d winter in Mesa, Az. watch all the. Curling to keep cool. best wishes at the Olympics next year. continue success .  Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 03.

Thank you for your support Mr. Ruddick. Team USA and RedBuilt are very appreciative.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Thanks Henry,

I am from Perryvale, my Dad was Ernie Lehto. Would have been great if he could have been here to watch. One tough end against both Sweden and Canada yesterday, but we will bounce back today.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Congratulations on being part of the worlds curling. Are you from the lehto family and which one from perryvale . Very best of luck. We are curling fans and watch all the games. Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 01.

A dedicated redbuilt blog reader.. Thanks for the curling coverage. Congratulations Darren and go team USA.

By bill ruddick on 2013 03 31.

Here is Heinz Mueller’s response:

You are correct, Renaldo. This application would show up more in a commercial structure vs. a residential structure. For an application such as this, I would think a moisture sealant applied to the glulam material would help alleviate the potential issues. That being said, if you decided to go that route you would probably want to start weighing the cost/benefit ratio for using additional products/services (sealant & application) vs. using similar products (LVL, I-joist blocking, etc.) for the blocking/rim board in the floor/roof system. I hope that helps. Thank you for the question and for your interest in the RedBuilt blogs! Heinz

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Here is a great reply that was posted to RedBuilt’s Linked In page:

Renaldo Montenegro, I am going to assume that using Glulams for blocking is more suited for a commercial application rather than a residential application. Thus, the Glulams carrying a very large vertical load from above. In a residential use I would see this as an over kill. Yes, I agree on the moisture content of the Glulams shrinking. Would a moisture sealant applied on the Glulams’ work in this case? A very good article! Thanks for sharing.

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Great to to hear this!!!

By Renaldo Montenegro on 2012 10 17.

Epically informative.  I learned a lot.

By Greg Riley on 2012 10 12.

[...] Posted on October 10, 2012 by [...]

By Deeper is Cheaper | RedBuilt Blog | Michael T. Dai on 2012 10 10.

[...] Call your local representative for a no cost consultation.  Read part 1 here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? (Part 2) | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 18.

[...] Read Part 2 of this article here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 17.

Great article Tom.  Not to intrude, but I would like to expand on how the Redbuilt Design Centers can help the engineer of record.  When I say help, I really mean increase the EOR’s profits while specifying a safer structural roof/floor system.  As I think back to my time as a specifying engineer, specifying Redbuilt’s Open Web trusses saved me time (I can go on about the differences between Redbuilt’s Pin Connected Open Web trusses and plated trusses but that is for another time).  When an EOR saves time, they in essence increase profits.

How does Redbuilt save an EOR time (great question)?  We do all the gravity calculations and truss connections for every loading aspect of a roof/floor system.  All the EOR has to do is specify a truss depth, truss series, show all design loads required and maybe a connection detail or two (with or without the help of a Redbuilt technical representative).  Also, if the EOR requires a PE to stamp both the shop drawing and calculations, our internal designers and engineers will provide technical oversight and assurance that products are used as intended. 

Not only can we save an EOR time but we also provide some assurance and piece of mind.

By Guy Brousseau on 2012 08 23.

Interesting to read about what you are doing, Jason.

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 29.

Sorry for the late response.  I’m glad you have enjoyed the first two.  The third was posted this past week.  It was a fun experience.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 28.

I know that learning involves failure, so thank you for being humble enough to learn.
Thank you, too, for sharing.  I’m enjoying your journey.

By Kathy Bracisco on 2012 07 24.

There is more to come.  This story will continue over the next few weeks and the whole world will know whether I was right or not.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I don’t want to give anything away because this story will continue over the next few weeks.  It was definitely an educational and enjoyable experience that I’m glad to share.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I’m guessing that you accurately predicted the failure.  I’m not an engineer, but you certainly made this understandable enough to read at my level.  Best wishes as you go for Level II!!

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 12.

Very interesting! I’m sure you will be right on.

By Norm Watts on 2012 07 12.

Thanks for the differentation of RedBuilt products.  I forwarded to two customers who wanted to know more about RedForm I joists vs. the “look alikes.”

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 25.

It is great to be a part of the legacy.  Thank you for sharing some perspective on what you are seeing both large-scale in the economy, and how the RedBuilt/legacy Trus Joist business has weathered storms in the past.

By Jeff Jack on 2012 06 23.

I like the blog and appreciate the wisdom in your words.  The focus on thriving vs. surviving is an inspiring shift of perspective.  Not easy, but RedBuilt will thrive without a doubt.  If it were easy everyone would be doing it.  RedBuilt has created a toe hold and a beginning.  Carry on.

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 20.

Hey Kurt -
I enjoyed reading this post about the old Tj and dealing with the last great recession.  I still remember those “PBL” days, wondering as a new hire if I would walk into work one day and find out that I didn’t have a job.  Fortunately that never happened, and I enjoyed the heck out of working for a great company like Trus Joist.
You guys at RedBuilt have got the old Tj culture and believe me, that will help drive your success.  All the best!
- Chris

By Chris Meyer on 2012 06 19.

Thanks Duane!  It certainly can be confusing.

By pdrace on 2012 06 16.

Great article, Paul. Nice job of laying it all out!

By Duane Bolt on 2012 06 15.

What I was impressed by was the load demand against the LVL iJoists while working in a residential market. Ya’ll make good stuff.

By Max Stanford on 2012 06 12.

back to blog

Deeper is Cheaper

Posted on October 10, 2012 by RedBuilt


The marketing group at RedBuilt™ has been doing some Blog soul searching because when we talk about our blogs, they always seem to have these words associated with them: “epically long” and “epically technical.” Although we do like the idea of being epic, we would rather be epic in other ways like epic customer experiences. So, from now on, we will “try” to summarize in our blog the highly informational, well written, and thoughtful articles that our associates have poured the hearts and souls into with a direct link to the full blown  “epic” versions for your perusal on our website.  You can find them at www.redbuilt.com under “Articles” in the “Resources” drop down. So, following our “epic summary” above (oxymoron, we know) here is our first summarized article: This week’s blog summary is on Deeper is Cheaper by Dwaine Charbonneau, P.E. at RedBuilt™.  Click here for the full length article. When you think of the price of an Open-Web Truss, you most likely think that if a truss is deeper, it will be more expensive (like an I-Joist). However, if an Open-Web Truss is deeper, it is (most often) cheaper. Please take a moment to familiarize yourself with the terms for each part of an Open-Web Truss as depicted in the picture (below), and then read on… “The primary factors that differentiate the costs of a shallow and a deep truss, given the span and loads, are the chord grades, pins, and labor. Bearing clips are the same regardless of depth, but the rest of the materials and labor are subject to quite a bit of variability, depending on a number of options available to the truss designer and his or her trusty design software.” (paragraph 6) Top and bottom chords: The material required for the bottom and the top chord can affect the grade of lumber (and therefore the price) because “The bottom chord typically supports minimal direct-applied loading – maybe some ducts, acoustic ceiling, or insulation – leaving the top chord to shoulder most of the load. Nevertheless, wood is usually weaker in tension than in compression parallel to grain, so the bottom chord may indeed become the critical design control” (paragraph 8). The top chord supports the supplied loads as well as the bending of the chord between the pins and the threat of buckling instability. These factors decide what grade of chord material will be used for an Open-Web truss and this is one of the ways in which deeper can be cheaper, “Engineers call this combination of bending and compression interaction or combined stress. To deal with it, the designer must again select the appropriate chord grade, but there is one more variable to consider: panel length. As the distance between top pins is shortened, the bending stresses and the tendency to buckle both decrease, and the chord is better able to handle the compression” (paragraph 12). Steel Tubes (Webs): “There is a practical limit to how tight the webs can be assembled. The minimum angle between the webs then determines how short the panels may be. This is one of the characteristics often found in a truss that is “maxed out:” lots of webs and closely-spaced pins” (paragraph 14). Steel Pins: If you choose a deeper truss, there will be longer panels which means there will be fewer panels and therefore, less pins. Truss Manufacturer’s Labor: If there are less panels, there is less time spent on drilling, routing, pressing and installing webs and pins. Overall, “Make the truss deeper. The chord grades drop, the number of pins is minimized, and the assembly is a breeze, relatively speaking. That’s how you save money on Open-Web trusses. There are other benefits that come with greater truss depth. It is much easier to run utilities through a roomy web layout as opposed to a cramped layout. And truss stiffness is roughly proportional to the square of the depth, so any increase in depth really pays off in minimizing deflection and improving floor performance” (paragraphs 21 & 22). Piqued your curiosity? Then click here to read the whole article. If you have further questions, contact your RedBuilt Technical Representative. Thanks for reading!  We hope you enjoyed it.


Leave a Reply

Did you notice that on page 4 we are showing table fabrication at our Stayton, OR facility? If so, you have a good eye and you probably work at Stayton! But fabrication looks about the same in Delaware.

By Cornelia Sprung on 2015 04 27.

I am interested in finding out more about RedBuild open web floor joist for residential.

For the past 15 years we have desiign our floors for L480 (even with dimensioal lumber) We pour 10’ basement walls, use TJI’s and end up boxing around mechanicals and spendind to much time and money firestopping and drafrstopping for the new IRC and IBC. Were can I get more info on RedBiuld Open web Joist

By Rolling Rock Construction Co on 2014 07 03.

Not sure why but I found your closing line hilarious. Probably because it’s corny, however it’s probably true as well! Good to know everything went well in the process. Shoppers will definitely be happy Im sure!

By Angela - Chicago Garage Builders on 2013 10 10.

Fantastic win against Scotland. Absalotely great. I curled against your Dad. was a wonderful man. I grew up on the farm where Art and Aggie now live. We have retired to Athabasca an d winter in Mesa, Az. watch all the. Curling to keep cool. best wishes at the Olympics next year. continue success .  Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 03.

Thank you for your support Mr. Ruddick. Team USA and RedBuilt are very appreciative.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Thanks Henry,

I am from Perryvale, my Dad was Ernie Lehto. Would have been great if he could have been here to watch. One tough end against both Sweden and Canada yesterday, but we will bounce back today.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Congratulations on being part of the worlds curling. Are you from the lehto family and which one from perryvale . Very best of luck. We are curling fans and watch all the games. Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 01.

A dedicated redbuilt blog reader.. Thanks for the curling coverage. Congratulations Darren and go team USA.

By bill ruddick on 2013 03 31.

Here is Heinz Mueller’s response:

You are correct, Renaldo. This application would show up more in a commercial structure vs. a residential structure. For an application such as this, I would think a moisture sealant applied to the glulam material would help alleviate the potential issues. That being said, if you decided to go that route you would probably want to start weighing the cost/benefit ratio for using additional products/services (sealant & application) vs. using similar products (LVL, I-joist blocking, etc.) for the blocking/rim board in the floor/roof system. I hope that helps. Thank you for the question and for your interest in the RedBuilt blogs! Heinz

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Here is a great reply that was posted to RedBuilt’s Linked In page:

Renaldo Montenegro, I am going to assume that using Glulams for blocking is more suited for a commercial application rather than a residential application. Thus, the Glulams carrying a very large vertical load from above. In a residential use I would see this as an over kill. Yes, I agree on the moisture content of the Glulams shrinking. Would a moisture sealant applied on the Glulams’ work in this case? A very good article! Thanks for sharing.

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Great to to hear this!!!

By Renaldo Montenegro on 2012 10 17.

Epically informative.  I learned a lot.

By Greg Riley on 2012 10 12.

[...] Posted on October 10, 2012 by [...]

By Deeper is Cheaper | RedBuilt Blog | Michael T. Dai on 2012 10 10.

[...] Call your local representative for a no cost consultation.  Read part 1 here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? (Part 2) | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 18.

[...] Read Part 2 of this article here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 17.

Great article Tom.  Not to intrude, but I would like to expand on how the Redbuilt Design Centers can help the engineer of record.  When I say help, I really mean increase the EOR’s profits while specifying a safer structural roof/floor system.  As I think back to my time as a specifying engineer, specifying Redbuilt’s Open Web trusses saved me time (I can go on about the differences between Redbuilt’s Pin Connected Open Web trusses and plated trusses but that is for another time).  When an EOR saves time, they in essence increase profits.

How does Redbuilt save an EOR time (great question)?  We do all the gravity calculations and truss connections for every loading aspect of a roof/floor system.  All the EOR has to do is specify a truss depth, truss series, show all design loads required and maybe a connection detail or two (with or without the help of a Redbuilt technical representative).  Also, if the EOR requires a PE to stamp both the shop drawing and calculations, our internal designers and engineers will provide technical oversight and assurance that products are used as intended. 

Not only can we save an EOR time but we also provide some assurance and piece of mind.

By Guy Brousseau on 2012 08 23.

Interesting to read about what you are doing, Jason.

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 29.

Sorry for the late response.  I’m glad you have enjoyed the first two.  The third was posted this past week.  It was a fun experience.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 28.

I know that learning involves failure, so thank you for being humble enough to learn.
Thank you, too, for sharing.  I’m enjoying your journey.

By Kathy Bracisco on 2012 07 24.

There is more to come.  This story will continue over the next few weeks and the whole world will know whether I was right or not.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I don’t want to give anything away because this story will continue over the next few weeks.  It was definitely an educational and enjoyable experience that I’m glad to share.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I’m guessing that you accurately predicted the failure.  I’m not an engineer, but you certainly made this understandable enough to read at my level.  Best wishes as you go for Level II!!

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 12.

Very interesting! I’m sure you will be right on.

By Norm Watts on 2012 07 12.

Thanks for the differentation of RedBuilt products.  I forwarded to two customers who wanted to know more about RedForm I joists vs. the “look alikes.”

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 25.

It is great to be a part of the legacy.  Thank you for sharing some perspective on what you are seeing both large-scale in the economy, and how the RedBuilt/legacy Trus Joist business has weathered storms in the past.

By Jeff Jack on 2012 06 23.

I like the blog and appreciate the wisdom in your words.  The focus on thriving vs. surviving is an inspiring shift of perspective.  Not easy, but RedBuilt will thrive without a doubt.  If it were easy everyone would be doing it.  RedBuilt has created a toe hold and a beginning.  Carry on.

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 20.

Hey Kurt -
I enjoyed reading this post about the old Tj and dealing with the last great recession.  I still remember those “PBL” days, wondering as a new hire if I would walk into work one day and find out that I didn’t have a job.  Fortunately that never happened, and I enjoyed the heck out of working for a great company like Trus Joist.
You guys at RedBuilt have got the old Tj culture and believe me, that will help drive your success.  All the best!
- Chris

By Chris Meyer on 2012 06 19.

Thanks Duane!  It certainly can be confusing.

By pdrace on 2012 06 16.

Great article, Paul. Nice job of laying it all out!

By Duane Bolt on 2012 06 15.

What I was impressed by was the load demand against the LVL iJoists while working in a residential market. Ya’ll make good stuff.

By Max Stanford on 2012 06 12.

back to blog

Introducing our newest Tech Rep, Wilson Antoniuk, PE, P.Eng.

Posted on October 04, 2012 by RedBuilt


[caption id="attachment_529" align="alignleft" width="300"] Wilson Antoniuk, Technical Representative at RedBuilt[/caption] Wilson is a Philadelphia native turned Idahoan after meeting a lovely Boise home town gal (Alyssa) and settled in the Treasure valley in the late 90’s. They have 4 children (two boys and two girls, 6-12 years old). Wilson originally enrolled as an Architectural Engineer at Drexel University before completing a teaching degree in mathematics at Juniata College, Huntingdon PA in 1994. After graduating, he taught Mathematics and Art in different settings, ranging from junior high all the way thru the collegiate level as an adjunct faculty member at Boise State University 1999-2000.  In spring 2001, he completed a Civil Engineering degree while teaching mathematics at Boise State University. Wilson’s first engineering position was as an EIT at Weyerhaeuser (Trus Joist Commercial Divison).  In July 2004, he became a Professional Engineer in California and continued working in the EWP products engineering department.  In 2009, the Commercial Division was sold to Atlas Holdings Company and re-branded as RedBuilt™  (after founding father- Harold “Red” Thomas) where Wilson became the Canadian lead for the engineering department and obtained the professional engineering title of P.Eng. in 2010. From there, he continued as a team lead in RedBuilt’s Boise production engineering department until 2012. In Wilson’s spare time, he enjoys family life, coaching and playing soccer, biking, skiing, rock-climbing, being outdoors and being involved in the community. His community involvement includes:

  • Coaching soccer for over 8 years at Les Bois, FC Nova and Idaho Rush
  • Leading Idaho food drive efforts at RedBuilt™
  • 2004-2005 United Wayfundraiser committee member
  • 2005-2007 Program Chair for SEAI
  • 2005-2007 American Cancer Society Relay for Life Participant
  • 2005 Habitat For Humanity Participant
  • 2006-2008 Civil Engineering Advisory Committee Board Member forBoiseStateUniversityCivil Engineering Department
  • 2007-2012 SEAI (Vice President, Treasurer, Director)
Wilson became the Technical Sales Representative for Southern Idaho and Northern Nevada for RedBuilt in June 2012 (after 11 years with the company). He is excited to utilize his 12 years of engineering experience to help his customers find solutions to their EWP problems. You can find Wilson and other Tech Rep’s contact information here.


Leave a Reply

Did you notice that on page 4 we are showing table fabrication at our Stayton, OR facility? If so, you have a good eye and you probably work at Stayton! But fabrication looks about the same in Delaware.

By Cornelia Sprung on 2015 04 27.

I am interested in finding out more about RedBuild open web floor joist for residential.

For the past 15 years we have desiign our floors for L480 (even with dimensioal lumber) We pour 10’ basement walls, use TJI’s and end up boxing around mechanicals and spendind to much time and money firestopping and drafrstopping for the new IRC and IBC. Were can I get more info on RedBiuld Open web Joist

By Rolling Rock Construction Co on 2014 07 03.

Not sure why but I found your closing line hilarious. Probably because it’s corny, however it’s probably true as well! Good to know everything went well in the process. Shoppers will definitely be happy Im sure!

By Angela - Chicago Garage Builders on 2013 10 10.

Fantastic win against Scotland. Absalotely great. I curled against your Dad. was a wonderful man. I grew up on the farm where Art and Aggie now live. We have retired to Athabasca an d winter in Mesa, Az. watch all the. Curling to keep cool. best wishes at the Olympics next year. continue success .  Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 03.

Thank you for your support Mr. Ruddick. Team USA and RedBuilt are very appreciative.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Thanks Henry,

I am from Perryvale, my Dad was Ernie Lehto. Would have been great if he could have been here to watch. One tough end against both Sweden and Canada yesterday, but we will bounce back today.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Congratulations on being part of the worlds curling. Are you from the lehto family and which one from perryvale . Very best of luck. We are curling fans and watch all the games. Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 01.

A dedicated redbuilt blog reader.. Thanks for the curling coverage. Congratulations Darren and go team USA.

By bill ruddick on 2013 03 31.

Here is Heinz Mueller’s response:

You are correct, Renaldo. This application would show up more in a commercial structure vs. a residential structure. For an application such as this, I would think a moisture sealant applied to the glulam material would help alleviate the potential issues. That being said, if you decided to go that route you would probably want to start weighing the cost/benefit ratio for using additional products/services (sealant & application) vs. using similar products (LVL, I-joist blocking, etc.) for the blocking/rim board in the floor/roof system. I hope that helps. Thank you for the question and for your interest in the RedBuilt blogs! Heinz

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Here is a great reply that was posted to RedBuilt’s Linked In page:

Renaldo Montenegro, I am going to assume that using Glulams for blocking is more suited for a commercial application rather than a residential application. Thus, the Glulams carrying a very large vertical load from above. In a residential use I would see this as an over kill. Yes, I agree on the moisture content of the Glulams shrinking. Would a moisture sealant applied on the Glulams’ work in this case? A very good article! Thanks for sharing.

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Great to to hear this!!!

By Renaldo Montenegro on 2012 10 17.

Epically informative.  I learned a lot.

By Greg Riley on 2012 10 12.

[...] Posted on October 10, 2012 by [...]

By Deeper is Cheaper | RedBuilt Blog | Michael T. Dai on 2012 10 10.

[...] Call your local representative for a no cost consultation.  Read part 1 here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? (Part 2) | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 18.

[...] Read Part 2 of this article here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 17.

Great article Tom.  Not to intrude, but I would like to expand on how the Redbuilt Design Centers can help the engineer of record.  When I say help, I really mean increase the EOR’s profits while specifying a safer structural roof/floor system.  As I think back to my time as a specifying engineer, specifying Redbuilt’s Open Web trusses saved me time (I can go on about the differences between Redbuilt’s Pin Connected Open Web trusses and plated trusses but that is for another time).  When an EOR saves time, they in essence increase profits.

How does Redbuilt save an EOR time (great question)?  We do all the gravity calculations and truss connections for every loading aspect of a roof/floor system.  All the EOR has to do is specify a truss depth, truss series, show all design loads required and maybe a connection detail or two (with or without the help of a Redbuilt technical representative).  Also, if the EOR requires a PE to stamp both the shop drawing and calculations, our internal designers and engineers will provide technical oversight and assurance that products are used as intended. 

Not only can we save an EOR time but we also provide some assurance and piece of mind.

By Guy Brousseau on 2012 08 23.

Interesting to read about what you are doing, Jason.

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 29.

Sorry for the late response.  I’m glad you have enjoyed the first two.  The third was posted this past week.  It was a fun experience.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 28.

I know that learning involves failure, so thank you for being humble enough to learn.
Thank you, too, for sharing.  I’m enjoying your journey.

By Kathy Bracisco on 2012 07 24.

There is more to come.  This story will continue over the next few weeks and the whole world will know whether I was right or not.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I don’t want to give anything away because this story will continue over the next few weeks.  It was definitely an educational and enjoyable experience that I’m glad to share.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I’m guessing that you accurately predicted the failure.  I’m not an engineer, but you certainly made this understandable enough to read at my level.  Best wishes as you go for Level II!!

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 12.

Very interesting! I’m sure you will be right on.

By Norm Watts on 2012 07 12.

Thanks for the differentation of RedBuilt products.  I forwarded to two customers who wanted to know more about RedForm I joists vs. the “look alikes.”

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 25.

It is great to be a part of the legacy.  Thank you for sharing some perspective on what you are seeing both large-scale in the economy, and how the RedBuilt/legacy Trus Joist business has weathered storms in the past.

By Jeff Jack on 2012 06 23.

I like the blog and appreciate the wisdom in your words.  The focus on thriving vs. surviving is an inspiring shift of perspective.  Not easy, but RedBuilt will thrive without a doubt.  If it were easy everyone would be doing it.  RedBuilt has created a toe hold and a beginning.  Carry on.

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 20.

Hey Kurt -
I enjoyed reading this post about the old Tj and dealing with the last great recession.  I still remember those “PBL” days, wondering as a new hire if I would walk into work one day and find out that I didn’t have a job.  Fortunately that never happened, and I enjoyed the heck out of working for a great company like Trus Joist.
You guys at RedBuilt have got the old Tj culture and believe me, that will help drive your success.  All the best!
- Chris

By Chris Meyer on 2012 06 19.

Thanks Duane!  It certainly can be confusing.

By pdrace on 2012 06 16.

Great article, Paul. Nice job of laying it all out!

By Duane Bolt on 2012 06 15.

What I was impressed by was the load demand against the LVL iJoists while working in a residential market. Ya’ll make good stuff.

By Max Stanford on 2012 06 12.

back to blog

RedBuilt’s 3rd Anniversary

Posted on September 25, 2012 by RedBuilt


by Kurt Liebich, C.E.O. at RedBuilt™ On August 14, 2012, RedBuilt™ and our 250 associates celebrated our 3rd anniversary.  Most start-up companies would take great pride in celebrating a 3rd birthday. After all, only a fraction of entrepreneurial start-ups survive over the long-term.  RedBuilt’s story is a bit different.  RedBuilt was founded over 50 years ago as the Commercial Division of Trus Joist®.  For 50 years, RedBuilt has worked with our Customers to build over 100,000 commercial structures across North America.   However, the successor company, RedBuilt, was founded only 3 short years ago when we purchased the Commercial Division of Trus Joist from the Weyerhaeuser Company.  While our legacy with Trus Joist is long, our experience as RedBuilt is only beginning. The last three years have been difficult for any company that services the commercial construction industry.  Many have failed and the ones that remain have demonstrated that they can truly provide value to the industry.  At RedBuilt, we take great pride in working with architects, structural engineers, contractors, and framers to ensure that the most efficient structural systems are specified, designed, and constructed.  On every project, we ensure the adequacy of the structural design, and our manufacturing associates strive each day to deliver quality structural solutions according to our Customers’ construction schedule.  We want our Customers to experience a hassle free experience on each and every job.  We appreciate the trust that you have in our products and solutions, and  value our long-standing business relationships.  Simply put, we couldn’t have survived without your support. We believe that the worst is behind us.  The November elections are creating quite a bit of uncertainty in the markets, and the banks still have extremely tight credit standards, which are delaying the start of many viable projects.  However, even with these head winds, we are seeing signs that the market is beginning to improve.  RedBuilt has quoted 10% more jobs in 2012 than we did in 2011.  This is directly related to a marginal improvement in the overall level of activity.   Additionally, we are starting to see that many of the jobs that we quoted in the 2008-2011 period are beginning to come back to life, and many “old” projects are getting funding and are moving forward.  Lastly, residential housing is slowly coming back to life.  While housing starts are well below historical averages, the data is improving.  While we are not expecting a dramatic increase in business activity, we do believe that the construction markets will increase and move toward historical norms over the next 5 years.  At RedBuilt, we are looking forward to working in this improved environment. I am proud of our RedBuilt associates, our suppliers, our Customers, and our investors, who stuck together to weather the most severe economic downturn since the Great Depression.  It has been a real struggle.  Those that are still standing have worked hard, made sacrifices, and demonstrated great levels of creativity and tenacity.   At RedBuilt, we look forward to continuing to work with our Customers to create structural solutions on each and every project.  Better days are most certainly ahead, and I remain thankful for the countless lessons that we have learned along the way.


Leave a Reply

Did you notice that on page 4 we are showing table fabrication at our Stayton, OR facility? If so, you have a good eye and you probably work at Stayton! But fabrication looks about the same in Delaware.

By Cornelia Sprung on 2015 04 27.

I am interested in finding out more about RedBuild open web floor joist for residential.

For the past 15 years we have desiign our floors for L480 (even with dimensioal lumber) We pour 10’ basement walls, use TJI’s and end up boxing around mechanicals and spendind to much time and money firestopping and drafrstopping for the new IRC and IBC. Were can I get more info on RedBiuld Open web Joist

By Rolling Rock Construction Co on 2014 07 03.

Not sure why but I found your closing line hilarious. Probably because it’s corny, however it’s probably true as well! Good to know everything went well in the process. Shoppers will definitely be happy Im sure!

By Angela - Chicago Garage Builders on 2013 10 10.

Fantastic win against Scotland. Absalotely great. I curled against your Dad. was a wonderful man. I grew up on the farm where Art and Aggie now live. We have retired to Athabasca an d winter in Mesa, Az. watch all the. Curling to keep cool. best wishes at the Olympics next year. continue success .  Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 03.

Thank you for your support Mr. Ruddick. Team USA and RedBuilt are very appreciative.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Thanks Henry,

I am from Perryvale, my Dad was Ernie Lehto. Would have been great if he could have been here to watch. One tough end against both Sweden and Canada yesterday, but we will bounce back today.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Congratulations on being part of the worlds curling. Are you from the lehto family and which one from perryvale . Very best of luck. We are curling fans and watch all the games. Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 01.

A dedicated redbuilt blog reader.. Thanks for the curling coverage. Congratulations Darren and go team USA.

By bill ruddick on 2013 03 31.

Here is Heinz Mueller’s response:

You are correct, Renaldo. This application would show up more in a commercial structure vs. a residential structure. For an application such as this, I would think a moisture sealant applied to the glulam material would help alleviate the potential issues. That being said, if you decided to go that route you would probably want to start weighing the cost/benefit ratio for using additional products/services (sealant & application) vs. using similar products (LVL, I-joist blocking, etc.) for the blocking/rim board in the floor/roof system. I hope that helps. Thank you for the question and for your interest in the RedBuilt blogs! Heinz

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Here is a great reply that was posted to RedBuilt’s Linked In page:

Renaldo Montenegro, I am going to assume that using Glulams for blocking is more suited for a commercial application rather than a residential application. Thus, the Glulams carrying a very large vertical load from above. In a residential use I would see this as an over kill. Yes, I agree on the moisture content of the Glulams shrinking. Would a moisture sealant applied on the Glulams’ work in this case? A very good article! Thanks for sharing.

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Great to to hear this!!!

By Renaldo Montenegro on 2012 10 17.

Epically informative.  I learned a lot.

By Greg Riley on 2012 10 12.

[...] Posted on October 10, 2012 by [...]

By Deeper is Cheaper | RedBuilt Blog | Michael T. Dai on 2012 10 10.

[...] Call your local representative for a no cost consultation.  Read part 1 here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? (Part 2) | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 18.

[...] Read Part 2 of this article here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 17.

Great article Tom.  Not to intrude, but I would like to expand on how the Redbuilt Design Centers can help the engineer of record.  When I say help, I really mean increase the EOR’s profits while specifying a safer structural roof/floor system.  As I think back to my time as a specifying engineer, specifying Redbuilt’s Open Web trusses saved me time (I can go on about the differences between Redbuilt’s Pin Connected Open Web trusses and plated trusses but that is for another time).  When an EOR saves time, they in essence increase profits.

How does Redbuilt save an EOR time (great question)?  We do all the gravity calculations and truss connections for every loading aspect of a roof/floor system.  All the EOR has to do is specify a truss depth, truss series, show all design loads required and maybe a connection detail or two (with or without the help of a Redbuilt technical representative).  Also, if the EOR requires a PE to stamp both the shop drawing and calculations, our internal designers and engineers will provide technical oversight and assurance that products are used as intended. 

Not only can we save an EOR time but we also provide some assurance and piece of mind.

By Guy Brousseau on 2012 08 23.

Interesting to read about what you are doing, Jason.

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 29.

Sorry for the late response.  I’m glad you have enjoyed the first two.  The third was posted this past week.  It was a fun experience.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 28.

I know that learning involves failure, so thank you for being humble enough to learn.
Thank you, too, for sharing.  I’m enjoying your journey.

By Kathy Bracisco on 2012 07 24.

There is more to come.  This story will continue over the next few weeks and the whole world will know whether I was right or not.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I don’t want to give anything away because this story will continue over the next few weeks.  It was definitely an educational and enjoyable experience that I’m glad to share.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I’m guessing that you accurately predicted the failure.  I’m not an engineer, but you certainly made this understandable enough to read at my level.  Best wishes as you go for Level II!!

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 12.

Very interesting! I’m sure you will be right on.

By Norm Watts on 2012 07 12.

Thanks for the differentation of RedBuilt products.  I forwarded to two customers who wanted to know more about RedForm I joists vs. the “look alikes.”

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 25.

It is great to be a part of the legacy.  Thank you for sharing some perspective on what you are seeing both large-scale in the economy, and how the RedBuilt/legacy Trus Joist business has weathered storms in the past.

By Jeff Jack on 2012 06 23.

I like the blog and appreciate the wisdom in your words.  The focus on thriving vs. surviving is an inspiring shift of perspective.  Not easy, but RedBuilt will thrive without a doubt.  If it were easy everyone would be doing it.  RedBuilt has created a toe hold and a beginning.  Carry on.

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 20.

Hey Kurt -
I enjoyed reading this post about the old Tj and dealing with the last great recession.  I still remember those “PBL” days, wondering as a new hire if I would walk into work one day and find out that I didn’t have a job.  Fortunately that never happened, and I enjoyed the heck out of working for a great company like Trus Joist.
You guys at RedBuilt have got the old Tj culture and believe me, that will help drive your success.  All the best!
- Chris

By Chris Meyer on 2012 06 19.

Thanks Duane!  It certainly can be confusing.

By pdrace on 2012 06 16.

Great article, Paul. Nice job of laying it all out!

By Duane Bolt on 2012 06 15.

What I was impressed by was the load demand against the LVL iJoists while working in a residential market. Ya’ll make good stuff.

By Max Stanford on 2012 06 12.

back to blog

Why RedBuilt™? (Part 2)

Posted on September 17, 2012 by RedBuilt


By Tom Byron, Technical Sales Representative at RedBuilt™ [caption id="attachment_448" align="alignleft" width="71"] Tom Byron, Technical Sales Representative at RedBuilt[/caption] This week’s “Why RedBuilt™? (Part 2)” focuses on how using RedBuilt™ products benefits contractors and building owners. Contractors and owners may understand why the AOR and EOR specify RedBuilt products: unparalleled technical support, lifetime warranty, high quality and high performance products, ease of design, etc.  Although understood, when the rubber meets the road, the contractor and owner are typically concerned more about the project economics.  So, it is critical to understand the installed cost benefits of RedBuilt projects as well as understand how to compare RedBuilt’s package to other suppliers. Framing and General Contractors:

  • RedBuilt does more to get projects specified in wood: For framers and general contractors that specialize in wood construction, this point should be of particular interest.  We spend thousands of hours each year working with architects, engineers, building departments, code developers,  and industry groups to promote the benefits of wood for commercial applications.  This, in turn, creates more opportunity for contractors, especially those that specialize in wood construction. So, when you purchase projects from RedBuilt, not only are you getting the best solution for your project, you are increasing your future opportunity.
  • Get the Best System Solution: At RedBuilt, not only do we proactively promote our industry, we directly assist design professionals in finding best systems that meet project requirements.  One particular area we focus on is lower installed costs, not product price, saving money for everyone involved in the project.  Our goal is to provide the most economical solution considering on-site safety, labor, material handling, time-to-install, etc. in addition to the cost of the physical materials being supplied.
  • Save Time by working with the company that was specified:  Working with the company that was specified saves time, and time is money.  Often times, there are alternate solutions to specified systems presented to contractors.  We, too, will provide alternate solutions when requested, but only when we can find a system that meets or exceeds project requirements and saves money.  Usually, alternate solutions stem from suppliers trying to “cheapen” their package with little consideration for effects      on installation costs, specified product performance, or long-term building performance.  The burden associated with getting alternates approved generally falls to the contractor(s), EOR, and/or AOR, adding time and money to the project.
  • Work with the company that has the resources to help coordinate with other players like the EOR and AOR: When specified, RedBuilt already worked with the design professionals to ensure that the best system that meets the designer’s and owner’s performance criteria with the lowest installed cost is already in place.  And should an efficient alternate be identified, we will assist with the approval process by working with the contractor and coordinating with the AOR and EOR to ensure that all parties benefit from proposed modifications.
  • Work with a company that wants to help  you save money:  You may find      that by having RedBuilt factory install web stiffeners at each end costs less than having your guys do it in the field. You may find the same if RedBuilt factory assembles double joists. Or how about a beveled cut included on one or both ends of the joist. Want more ideas like this? Contact your RedBuilt Technical Representative.
  • Get a clear, easy to understand Quote: At RedBuilt, we stand by our quotes and provide whole system solutions, not parts and pieces of materials.  This is critical when comparing packages.  Seldom, if ever, do competing quotes include the same items or guarantees.  Make certain you determine that the quotes are comparable and include not only equal products, but also considers additional items like included accessories and services that will save time and money on site. Remember that the low product quote may not be the lowest installed quote, so make certain you’re comparing apples to apples.
  • Get Total Support directly from the manufacturer: RedBuilt has Technical Representatives who will meet with you and your team before installation to discuss how to safely install the products you purchased and to answer questions before you start the project, saving you time and money. Additionally, should questions arise during installation, the same Technical Representative will be there to help.  And to top it all off, in most regions, we can perform a post-installation review and provide you with a report that you can use to demonstrate to the building owner, EOR, AOR and building department  that you properly installed your RedBuilt products.
Developers/Owners:
  • Get the solution that meets the intended design requirements: Insist on RedBuilt.  This way, you are guaranteed you are getting what you intended when you set out on the path of designing and building your structure.  Remember all the      passion and time you and your design team invested laying out and designing your building – making tough decisions and laboring over the perfect building for you. And, last minute, someone comes in with what they a call a “better solution.”  “Better,” in this instance is likely code for “cheaper.” Curious that all that work and time invested is jeopardized because someone else thinks they know better than you and your design team what your goals are.  Offering an alternate solution should bring a few questions to mind:
    • How do they know why we made our decisions?
    • Are their suggestions in my or their best interest?
    • What is their goal, and does it match mine?
It doesn’t feel quite right, does it?  At RedBuilt, we try to preserve your intentions  with a goal of providing the best system at the lowest installed cost.  We are so confident in our ability to do so that we offer product warranty for the life of your building offering you, the building owner, piece of mind that your manufacturer stands behind the products you are purchasing.
  • Post-Installation Review to provide you piece-of-mind: When you use RedBuilt products, not only do we provide a lifetime warranty, we offer post-installation reviews.  As a part of our review, we can provide a copy of our “Jobsite Review Form” which shows that one of our RedBuilt representatives reviewed the installation of RedBuilt products, and found your contractor’s installation met the installation requirements – yet more piece of mind.
How do you protect your project?
  • Require bidders disclose which manufacturer’s products they will be supplying at bid time.
  • Require substitutions to meet or exceed design specifications.
  • Require a jobsite review by the manufacturer.
  • Require shop drawings stamped by the manufacturer, not a third party.
  • Require a warranty that lasts for the lifetime of the building.
  • Call your local representative for a no cost consultation.
Read part 1 here.


Leave a Reply

Did you notice that on page 4 we are showing table fabrication at our Stayton, OR facility? If so, you have a good eye and you probably work at Stayton! But fabrication looks about the same in Delaware.

By Cornelia Sprung on 2015 04 27.

I am interested in finding out more about RedBuild open web floor joist for residential.

For the past 15 years we have desiign our floors for L480 (even with dimensioal lumber) We pour 10’ basement walls, use TJI’s and end up boxing around mechanicals and spendind to much time and money firestopping and drafrstopping for the new IRC and IBC. Were can I get more info on RedBiuld Open web Joist

By Rolling Rock Construction Co on 2014 07 03.

Not sure why but I found your closing line hilarious. Probably because it’s corny, however it’s probably true as well! Good to know everything went well in the process. Shoppers will definitely be happy Im sure!

By Angela - Chicago Garage Builders on 2013 10 10.

Fantastic win against Scotland. Absalotely great. I curled against your Dad. was a wonderful man. I grew up on the farm where Art and Aggie now live. We have retired to Athabasca an d winter in Mesa, Az. watch all the. Curling to keep cool. best wishes at the Olympics next year. continue success .  Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 03.

Thank you for your support Mr. Ruddick. Team USA and RedBuilt are very appreciative.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Thanks Henry,

I am from Perryvale, my Dad was Ernie Lehto. Would have been great if he could have been here to watch. One tough end against both Sweden and Canada yesterday, but we will bounce back today.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Congratulations on being part of the worlds curling. Are you from the lehto family and which one from perryvale . Very best of luck. We are curling fans and watch all the games. Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 01.

A dedicated redbuilt blog reader.. Thanks for the curling coverage. Congratulations Darren and go team USA.

By bill ruddick on 2013 03 31.

Here is Heinz Mueller’s response:

You are correct, Renaldo. This application would show up more in a commercial structure vs. a residential structure. For an application such as this, I would think a moisture sealant applied to the glulam material would help alleviate the potential issues. That being said, if you decided to go that route you would probably want to start weighing the cost/benefit ratio for using additional products/services (sealant & application) vs. using similar products (LVL, I-joist blocking, etc.) for the blocking/rim board in the floor/roof system. I hope that helps. Thank you for the question and for your interest in the RedBuilt blogs! Heinz

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Here is a great reply that was posted to RedBuilt’s Linked In page:

Renaldo Montenegro, I am going to assume that using Glulams for blocking is more suited for a commercial application rather than a residential application. Thus, the Glulams carrying a very large vertical load from above. In a residential use I would see this as an over kill. Yes, I agree on the moisture content of the Glulams shrinking. Would a moisture sealant applied on the Glulams’ work in this case? A very good article! Thanks for sharing.

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Great to to hear this!!!

By Renaldo Montenegro on 2012 10 17.

Epically informative.  I learned a lot.

By Greg Riley on 2012 10 12.

[...] Posted on October 10, 2012 by [...]

By Deeper is Cheaper | RedBuilt Blog | Michael T. Dai on 2012 10 10.

[...] Call your local representative for a no cost consultation.  Read part 1 here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? (Part 2) | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 18.

[...] Read Part 2 of this article here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 17.

Great article Tom.  Not to intrude, but I would like to expand on how the Redbuilt Design Centers can help the engineer of record.  When I say help, I really mean increase the EOR’s profits while specifying a safer structural roof/floor system.  As I think back to my time as a specifying engineer, specifying Redbuilt’s Open Web trusses saved me time (I can go on about the differences between Redbuilt’s Pin Connected Open Web trusses and plated trusses but that is for another time).  When an EOR saves time, they in essence increase profits.

How does Redbuilt save an EOR time (great question)?  We do all the gravity calculations and truss connections for every loading aspect of a roof/floor system.  All the EOR has to do is specify a truss depth, truss series, show all design loads required and maybe a connection detail or two (with or without the help of a Redbuilt technical representative).  Also, if the EOR requires a PE to stamp both the shop drawing and calculations, our internal designers and engineers will provide technical oversight and assurance that products are used as intended. 

Not only can we save an EOR time but we also provide some assurance and piece of mind.

By Guy Brousseau on 2012 08 23.

Interesting to read about what you are doing, Jason.

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 29.

Sorry for the late response.  I’m glad you have enjoyed the first two.  The third was posted this past week.  It was a fun experience.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 28.

I know that learning involves failure, so thank you for being humble enough to learn.
Thank you, too, for sharing.  I’m enjoying your journey.

By Kathy Bracisco on 2012 07 24.

There is more to come.  This story will continue over the next few weeks and the whole world will know whether I was right or not.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I don’t want to give anything away because this story will continue over the next few weeks.  It was definitely an educational and enjoyable experience that I’m glad to share.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I’m guessing that you accurately predicted the failure.  I’m not an engineer, but you certainly made this understandable enough to read at my level.  Best wishes as you go for Level II!!

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 12.

Very interesting! I’m sure you will be right on.

By Norm Watts on 2012 07 12.

Thanks for the differentation of RedBuilt products.  I forwarded to two customers who wanted to know more about RedForm I joists vs. the “look alikes.”

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 25.

It is great to be a part of the legacy.  Thank you for sharing some perspective on what you are seeing both large-scale in the economy, and how the RedBuilt/legacy Trus Joist business has weathered storms in the past.

By Jeff Jack on 2012 06 23.

I like the blog and appreciate the wisdom in your words.  The focus on thriving vs. surviving is an inspiring shift of perspective.  Not easy, but RedBuilt will thrive without a doubt.  If it were easy everyone would be doing it.  RedBuilt has created a toe hold and a beginning.  Carry on.

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 20.

Hey Kurt -
I enjoyed reading this post about the old Tj and dealing with the last great recession.  I still remember those “PBL” days, wondering as a new hire if I would walk into work one day and find out that I didn’t have a job.  Fortunately that never happened, and I enjoyed the heck out of working for a great company like Trus Joist.
You guys at RedBuilt have got the old Tj culture and believe me, that will help drive your success.  All the best!
- Chris

By Chris Meyer on 2012 06 19.

Thanks Duane!  It certainly can be confusing.

By pdrace on 2012 06 16.

Great article, Paul. Nice job of laying it all out!

By Duane Bolt on 2012 06 15.

What I was impressed by was the load demand against the LVL iJoists while working in a residential market. Ya’ll make good stuff.

By Max Stanford on 2012 06 12.

back to blog

“Late Breaking News!  RedBuilt EWP Channel Exclusive Story! A startup that’s 50 years old”

Posted on August 29, 2012 by RedBuilt


by Paul Drace, Director of Marketing at RedBuilt At RedBuilt™, we pride ourselves on being the industry leader not only in quality and breadth of product offering, but also in information. To expand and improve our methods of sharing information with all of you, we are adding videos to our arsenal.  Videos are intended to be a complement to the many ways we share information today including our website, blog, social media, and most importantly our Technical Sales Representatives. So, click here to see our humble beginnings on our YouTube channel. I highly recommend the RedBuilt™ - A 50-Year Old Startup video as an introduction to who we are and from where it is we came.  You can also read about our company’s history on this blog by clicking here. In addition to the introductory video, we have a couple of videos that give overviews of our RedBuilt line of products including Open-Web Trusses, Red-I™ I-joists and RedLam™ LVL, as well as a video about our RedSpec™ single-member sizing software. This is just the beginning.  Next on the agenda is a series of videos about our Open-Web Trusses.  So, keep an eye out for future videos about RedBuilt, our products, and their applications. And most importantly…please let us know what you think and let us know of any specific video ideas you would find beneficial by commenting here.  We’d love to hear from you, and value your ideas!


Leave a Reply

Did you notice that on page 4 we are showing table fabrication at our Stayton, OR facility? If so, you have a good eye and you probably work at Stayton! But fabrication looks about the same in Delaware.

By Cornelia Sprung on 2015 04 27.

I am interested in finding out more about RedBuild open web floor joist for residential.

For the past 15 years we have desiign our floors for L480 (even with dimensioal lumber) We pour 10’ basement walls, use TJI’s and end up boxing around mechanicals and spendind to much time and money firestopping and drafrstopping for the new IRC and IBC. Were can I get more info on RedBiuld Open web Joist

By Rolling Rock Construction Co on 2014 07 03.

Not sure why but I found your closing line hilarious. Probably because it’s corny, however it’s probably true as well! Good to know everything went well in the process. Shoppers will definitely be happy Im sure!

By Angela - Chicago Garage Builders on 2013 10 10.

Fantastic win against Scotland. Absalotely great. I curled against your Dad. was a wonderful man. I grew up on the farm where Art and Aggie now live. We have retired to Athabasca an d winter in Mesa, Az. watch all the. Curling to keep cool. best wishes at the Olympics next year. continue success .  Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 03.

Thank you for your support Mr. Ruddick. Team USA and RedBuilt are very appreciative.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Thanks Henry,

I am from Perryvale, my Dad was Ernie Lehto. Would have been great if he could have been here to watch. One tough end against both Sweden and Canada yesterday, but we will bounce back today.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Congratulations on being part of the worlds curling. Are you from the lehto family and which one from perryvale . Very best of luck. We are curling fans and watch all the games. Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 01.

A dedicated redbuilt blog reader.. Thanks for the curling coverage. Congratulations Darren and go team USA.

By bill ruddick on 2013 03 31.

Here is Heinz Mueller’s response:

You are correct, Renaldo. This application would show up more in a commercial structure vs. a residential structure. For an application such as this, I would think a moisture sealant applied to the glulam material would help alleviate the potential issues. That being said, if you decided to go that route you would probably want to start weighing the cost/benefit ratio for using additional products/services (sealant & application) vs. using similar products (LVL, I-joist blocking, etc.) for the blocking/rim board in the floor/roof system. I hope that helps. Thank you for the question and for your interest in the RedBuilt blogs! Heinz

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Here is a great reply that was posted to RedBuilt’s Linked In page:

Renaldo Montenegro, I am going to assume that using Glulams for blocking is more suited for a commercial application rather than a residential application. Thus, the Glulams carrying a very large vertical load from above. In a residential use I would see this as an over kill. Yes, I agree on the moisture content of the Glulams shrinking. Would a moisture sealant applied on the Glulams’ work in this case? A very good article! Thanks for sharing.

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Great to to hear this!!!

By Renaldo Montenegro on 2012 10 17.

Epically informative.  I learned a lot.

By Greg Riley on 2012 10 12.

[...] Posted on October 10, 2012 by [...]

By Deeper is Cheaper | RedBuilt Blog | Michael T. Dai on 2012 10 10.

[...] Call your local representative for a no cost consultation.  Read part 1 here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? (Part 2) | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 18.

[...] Read Part 2 of this article here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 17.

Great article Tom.  Not to intrude, but I would like to expand on how the Redbuilt Design Centers can help the engineer of record.  When I say help, I really mean increase the EOR’s profits while specifying a safer structural roof/floor system.  As I think back to my time as a specifying engineer, specifying Redbuilt’s Open Web trusses saved me time (I can go on about the differences between Redbuilt’s Pin Connected Open Web trusses and plated trusses but that is for another time).  When an EOR saves time, they in essence increase profits.

How does Redbuilt save an EOR time (great question)?  We do all the gravity calculations and truss connections for every loading aspect of a roof/floor system.  All the EOR has to do is specify a truss depth, truss series, show all design loads required and maybe a connection detail or two (with or without the help of a Redbuilt technical representative).  Also, if the EOR requires a PE to stamp both the shop drawing and calculations, our internal designers and engineers will provide technical oversight and assurance that products are used as intended. 

Not only can we save an EOR time but we also provide some assurance and piece of mind.

By Guy Brousseau on 2012 08 23.

Interesting to read about what you are doing, Jason.

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 29.

Sorry for the late response.  I’m glad you have enjoyed the first two.  The third was posted this past week.  It was a fun experience.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 28.

I know that learning involves failure, so thank you for being humble enough to learn.
Thank you, too, for sharing.  I’m enjoying your journey.

By Kathy Bracisco on 2012 07 24.

There is more to come.  This story will continue over the next few weeks and the whole world will know whether I was right or not.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I don’t want to give anything away because this story will continue over the next few weeks.  It was definitely an educational and enjoyable experience that I’m glad to share.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I’m guessing that you accurately predicted the failure.  I’m not an engineer, but you certainly made this understandable enough to read at my level.  Best wishes as you go for Level II!!

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 12.

Very interesting! I’m sure you will be right on.

By Norm Watts on 2012 07 12.

Thanks for the differentation of RedBuilt products.  I forwarded to two customers who wanted to know more about RedForm I joists vs. the “look alikes.”

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 25.

It is great to be a part of the legacy.  Thank you for sharing some perspective on what you are seeing both large-scale in the economy, and how the RedBuilt/legacy Trus Joist business has weathered storms in the past.

By Jeff Jack on 2012 06 23.

I like the blog and appreciate the wisdom in your words.  The focus on thriving vs. surviving is an inspiring shift of perspective.  Not easy, but RedBuilt will thrive without a doubt.  If it were easy everyone would be doing it.  RedBuilt has created a toe hold and a beginning.  Carry on.

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 20.

Hey Kurt -
I enjoyed reading this post about the old Tj and dealing with the last great recession.  I still remember those “PBL” days, wondering as a new hire if I would walk into work one day and find out that I didn’t have a job.  Fortunately that never happened, and I enjoyed the heck out of working for a great company like Trus Joist.
You guys at RedBuilt have got the old Tj culture and believe me, that will help drive your success.  All the best!
- Chris

By Chris Meyer on 2012 06 19.

Thanks Duane!  It certainly can be confusing.

By pdrace on 2012 06 16.

Great article, Paul. Nice job of laying it all out!

By Duane Bolt on 2012 06 15.

What I was impressed by was the load demand against the LVL iJoists while working in a residential market. Ya’ll make good stuff.

By Max Stanford on 2012 06 12.

back to blog

Why RedBuilt™?

Posted on August 23, 2012 by RedBuilt


By Tom Byron, Technical Sales Representative at RedBuilt™ [caption id="attachment_448" align="alignleft" width="71"] Tom Byron, Technical Sales Representative at RedBuilt[/caption] Why use RedBuilt™ products and services? This question is asked everyday by a variety of design professionals, contractors, property owners, and building department officials. This two part series will help explain the benefits of using RedBuilt engineered wood products. Part one is aimed at the design professionals and building departments. These individuals understand that commercial buildings are inherently different from residential buildings and must be designed and built to guarantee public safety. Part two will focus on how using RedBuilt products benefits contractors and building owners. The construction business has been going through some major shifts in types of buildings being constructed; an example would be the now popular mixed use buildings. Mixed use buildings require a thorough understanding of building code requirements as a result of the combination of different uses, fire rating requirements, etc. The turbulent times of the past few years have resulted in many building component manufacturers and construction firms either going out of business or drastically reducing their size. Due to the scarcity of projects in this economy, many contractors and suppliers have started to bid projects outside of their areas of expertise as a means for survival.  Unfortunately, they often times “win” these projects as a result of their inexperience. Invariably, this leads to challenges on the jobsite including attempts to mitigate costs by substituting products, changing details during construction, etc.. so how can you ensure a building is built to perform the way it was designed? How do architects, engineers and building departments protect themselves and the general public? It’s Simple: Specify RedBuilt products and services and hold to your specification.                                     As the industry leader in the commercial engineered wood products business, RedBuilt has been setting the industry standard since our founders first developed the Red Open-Web trusses, I-joists (Red-I™ I-joists), and laminated veneer lumber (RedLam™ LVL). Not only do we have the largest selection of engineered wood products to meet the needs of the commercial construction industry, but we also provide more engineering and technical assistance than any other company in the business. So how does this help the AOR, EOR and Building Departments? The most important advantage in specifying and insisting on the use of RedBuilt products is safety. RedBuilt is a company built on safety, service, and engineering. We take the word “engineered” so seriously that we employ over ten professional licensed engineers in varying roles from production engineering, corporate engineering, operations, and marketing. In addition to working to ensure our products are used properly in your buildings, their duties also include product quality assurance at our four manufacturing plants, product testing, code approvals, training, and new product development. We have five RedBuilt Design Centers (shop drawing department) strategically located at our manufacturing facilities and corporate headquarters.  Each Design Center is directed by a licensed professional engineer.  When required, our engineers review, approve and seal shop drawings as well as RedBuilt product load calculations.  Since they are employees of RedBuilt, you know they have laser focus and understanding of our products and are incredible resources for solving, and perhaps more importantly, preventing issues on the jobsite. Engaging our technical representatives during the design phase to optimize systems and requiring shop drawings to be reviewed and sealed by a professional engineer employed by the manufacturer allows AOR and EOR to focus on overall building envelope design and load development. Building Inspectors know that if RedBuilt products are supplied, the actual manufacturer is checking the design to make certain their products are being used in the correct application. RedBuilt will provide free design assistance by our Technical Sales Representatives. We will visit your office at any time to help with a design or provide a lunch and learn training session to refresh your knowledge of our products. You can also use our on-line design manual and software at http://www.redbuilt.com/ or speak directly with our engineers. Technical Representatives are also a resource for jobsite support.  We can stop by each jobsite to answer any questions the contractor may have. During this visit, the RedBuilt representative will walk the jobsite and review the installation of RedBuilt products. You, as a design professional, can have in your specification a requirement for the manufacturer to do this review. This piece-of-mind is a primary reason National Account Chains require RedBuilt to be used on their projects. So, what do other manufacturers and suppliers do? Most other manufacturers do not employ licensed professional engineers to review shop drawings, designs, or how a product substitution will perform. Instead, they rely on brokers and lumberyard sales people to redesign your projects. Since these manufacturers have smaller product lines than RedBuilt, and products that, in many cases, do not meet or exceed the specified products, they will need to make substantial changes to find a solution that “works.” They may substitute lesser products, increase depth or change on center-spacing to get a product that they think will work. They then expect the EOR/AOR to approve their solution with little understanding of why the original solution was used.  This causes delays and additional check time for the AOR/EOR. If a broker is supplying material, that’s all they’ll do, supply material.  They cut costs by eliminating seals on shop drawings.  Instead, they simply do a layout plan on top of the EOR’s structural drawings and pay to have the calculations stamped, which typically means that the output, based on input by others, is correct…not very reassuring. It doesn’t mean that the data was checked or any of the connection details were checked. In other words the entire burden is on the EOR/AOR. Lumberyards attempt to convert the specified commercial products to a residential product line they carry. Often, residential products have different chord and web thickness, which raises a few questions: Does your nailing still work? Is the deflection still adequate? Does the end reaction require web stiffeners? We are now seeing a push by residential manufacturers to get their products specified on commercial projects. When there is a mix of residential and commercial products on a project, sales people feel they have more flexibility to make product substitutions. They try to replace the commercial products so they can sell the whole project. This means no shop drawings, no application validation, and no responsibility for what is being supplied. There are also many contractors who build custom homes or multifamily projects that think they can just substitute products as they wish. Since each lumberyard sells a different manufacturer’s product line and they have always swapped those out before, why not do the same on a commercial project? If there aren’t any shop drawings required then often the EOR doesn’t even know a project he designed is being built to different standards. Competitors will also swap out hardware without checking nailing requirements. RedBuilt uses Simpson hardware to ensure the connections work as detailed and we know Simpson keeps all code approvals up to date. So, what can you do? Seven Steps Architects, Engineers and Building Departments can take to ensure your intentions and designs are being followed and your buildings are safe.

  1. Require the manufacturer to have a professional engineer seal both the shop      drawings and the calculations they submit.
  2. Require jobsite reviews and a verification letter by the product manufacturer.
  3. Require substituted products to be equal to or exceed specified products design      properties.
  4. Require only commercial products on commercial buildings.
  5. Require compensation for the design professional for time spent reviewing product      substitutions.
  6. Require professional engineer sealed shop drawings and load calculations for the “as built” drawings to be submitted to building departments.
  7. Specify RedBuilt. The only company manufacturing for over 50 years in the      Engineered Wood Business.
Read Part 2 of this article here.


Leave a Reply

Did you notice that on page 4 we are showing table fabrication at our Stayton, OR facility? If so, you have a good eye and you probably work at Stayton! But fabrication looks about the same in Delaware.

By Cornelia Sprung on 2015 04 27.

I am interested in finding out more about RedBuild open web floor joist for residential.

For the past 15 years we have desiign our floors for L480 (even with dimensioal lumber) We pour 10’ basement walls, use TJI’s and end up boxing around mechanicals and spendind to much time and money firestopping and drafrstopping for the new IRC and IBC. Were can I get more info on RedBiuld Open web Joist

By Rolling Rock Construction Co on 2014 07 03.

Not sure why but I found your closing line hilarious. Probably because it’s corny, however it’s probably true as well! Good to know everything went well in the process. Shoppers will definitely be happy Im sure!

By Angela - Chicago Garage Builders on 2013 10 10.

Fantastic win against Scotland. Absalotely great. I curled against your Dad. was a wonderful man. I grew up on the farm where Art and Aggie now live. We have retired to Athabasca an d winter in Mesa, Az. watch all the. Curling to keep cool. best wishes at the Olympics next year. continue success .  Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 03.

Thank you for your support Mr. Ruddick. Team USA and RedBuilt are very appreciative.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Thanks Henry,

I am from Perryvale, my Dad was Ernie Lehto. Would have been great if he could have been here to watch. One tough end against both Sweden and Canada yesterday, but we will bounce back today.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Congratulations on being part of the worlds curling. Are you from the lehto family and which one from perryvale . Very best of luck. We are curling fans and watch all the games. Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 01.

A dedicated redbuilt blog reader.. Thanks for the curling coverage. Congratulations Darren and go team USA.

By bill ruddick on 2013 03 31.

Here is Heinz Mueller’s response:

You are correct, Renaldo. This application would show up more in a commercial structure vs. a residential structure. For an application such as this, I would think a moisture sealant applied to the glulam material would help alleviate the potential issues. That being said, if you decided to go that route you would probably want to start weighing the cost/benefit ratio for using additional products/services (sealant & application) vs. using similar products (LVL, I-joist blocking, etc.) for the blocking/rim board in the floor/roof system. I hope that helps. Thank you for the question and for your interest in the RedBuilt blogs! Heinz

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Here is a great reply that was posted to RedBuilt’s Linked In page:

Renaldo Montenegro, I am going to assume that using Glulams for blocking is more suited for a commercial application rather than a residential application. Thus, the Glulams carrying a very large vertical load from above. In a residential use I would see this as an over kill. Yes, I agree on the moisture content of the Glulams shrinking. Would a moisture sealant applied on the Glulams’ work in this case? A very good article! Thanks for sharing.

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Great to to hear this!!!

By Renaldo Montenegro on 2012 10 17.

Epically informative.  I learned a lot.

By Greg Riley on 2012 10 12.

[...] Posted on October 10, 2012 by [...]

By Deeper is Cheaper | RedBuilt Blog | Michael T. Dai on 2012 10 10.

[...] Call your local representative for a no cost consultation.  Read part 1 here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? (Part 2) | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 18.

[...] Read Part 2 of this article here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 17.

Great article Tom.  Not to intrude, but I would like to expand on how the Redbuilt Design Centers can help the engineer of record.  When I say help, I really mean increase the EOR’s profits while specifying a safer structural roof/floor system.  As I think back to my time as a specifying engineer, specifying Redbuilt’s Open Web trusses saved me time (I can go on about the differences between Redbuilt’s Pin Connected Open Web trusses and plated trusses but that is for another time).  When an EOR saves time, they in essence increase profits.

How does Redbuilt save an EOR time (great question)?  We do all the gravity calculations and truss connections for every loading aspect of a roof/floor system.  All the EOR has to do is specify a truss depth, truss series, show all design loads required and maybe a connection detail or two (with or without the help of a Redbuilt technical representative).  Also, if the EOR requires a PE to stamp both the shop drawing and calculations, our internal designers and engineers will provide technical oversight and assurance that products are used as intended. 

Not only can we save an EOR time but we also provide some assurance and piece of mind.

By Guy Brousseau on 2012 08 23.

Interesting to read about what you are doing, Jason.

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 29.

Sorry for the late response.  I’m glad you have enjoyed the first two.  The third was posted this past week.  It was a fun experience.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 28.

I know that learning involves failure, so thank you for being humble enough to learn.
Thank you, too, for sharing.  I’m enjoying your journey.

By Kathy Bracisco on 2012 07 24.

There is more to come.  This story will continue over the next few weeks and the whole world will know whether I was right or not.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I don’t want to give anything away because this story will continue over the next few weeks.  It was definitely an educational and enjoyable experience that I’m glad to share.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I’m guessing that you accurately predicted the failure.  I’m not an engineer, but you certainly made this understandable enough to read at my level.  Best wishes as you go for Level II!!

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 12.

Very interesting! I’m sure you will be right on.

By Norm Watts on 2012 07 12.

Thanks for the differentation of RedBuilt products.  I forwarded to two customers who wanted to know more about RedForm I joists vs. the “look alikes.”

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 25.

It is great to be a part of the legacy.  Thank you for sharing some perspective on what you are seeing both large-scale in the economy, and how the RedBuilt/legacy Trus Joist business has weathered storms in the past.

By Jeff Jack on 2012 06 23.

I like the blog and appreciate the wisdom in your words.  The focus on thriving vs. surviving is an inspiring shift of perspective.  Not easy, but RedBuilt will thrive without a doubt.  If it were easy everyone would be doing it.  RedBuilt has created a toe hold and a beginning.  Carry on.

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 20.

Hey Kurt -
I enjoyed reading this post about the old Tj and dealing with the last great recession.  I still remember those “PBL” days, wondering as a new hire if I would walk into work one day and find out that I didn’t have a job.  Fortunately that never happened, and I enjoyed the heck out of working for a great company like Trus Joist.
You guys at RedBuilt have got the old Tj culture and believe me, that will help drive your success.  All the best!
- Chris

By Chris Meyer on 2012 06 19.

Thanks Duane!  It certainly can be confusing.

By pdrace on 2012 06 16.

Great article, Paul. Nice job of laying it all out!

By Duane Bolt on 2012 06 15.

What I was impressed by was the load demand against the LVL iJoists while working in a residential market. Ya’ll make good stuff.

By Max Stanford on 2012 06 12.

back to blog

Let RedBuilt™ help you with that – A word of caution when modifying or fixing Open-Web trusses.

Posted on August 08, 2012 by RedBuilt


by Wilson Antoniuk, RedBuilt™ Technical Sales Representative for Southern Idaho Did you know that every RedBuilt™ Open-Web truss is custom designed and manufactured for its specific application and loading? Or that we maintain archives of our truss designs and as-built manufacturing reports back to the 1960’s? Or that stiffening a portion of the truss can actually be more detrimental to a truss’ performance than doing nothing? I could go on, but ultimately, all these questions lead to one conclusion:  Repairing or modifying trusses cannot be taken lightly.  So, before you cut or repair a RedBuilt™ product, please take a moment to make certain you're equipped with the knowledge base and information necessary to do it properly keeping in mind that, first and foremost, these structural members are protecting people, and when modified or repaired improperly, can lead to injury or even death of the building occupants in the case of collapse. The best and easiest way for you to tackle repairs or modifications is to get us involved as soon as an issue is identified. This is true whether it is a RedBuilt™ project with Red-I™ i-joists, RedLam™ LVL, or our Red series Open-Web trusses, or an existing Open-Web project originally manufactured by Trus Joist®.  If you are the owner, GC, Architect, Framer, or Engineer, there are mountains of benefits from getting RedBuilt™ involved:

  • We've assisted with the design of thousands of repairs and have the expertise and resources to do it properly.
  • We have over 50 years of archived projects with as-built truss reports as well as a dedicated repair team of designers and professional engineers.
  • RedBuilt™ puts together repair instructions, details, and manufactures repair parts, and special tooling to assure that repairs can be done accurately and with quality workmanship to bring the structural member back to its original design capacity.
  • When RedBuilt™ works with the design professional of record in determining the right fix (if repair is possible), our warranty can remain in effect for the life-expectancy of the structure (Follow this link for more details http://www.redbuilt.com/images/docs/RedBuilt%20Repair%20Memo.pdf).
  • You can be assured that you did the right thing for your customer and the public because you safely solved the problem with the help of RedBuilt™.
[caption id="attachment_437" align="alignright" width="300"] The first web of this truss was removed. Now, the member is supported by 2-2x8 outriggers below top chord in Simpson joist hanger. The roof has dropped and is collapsing (shoring currently supporting structure).[/caption] Sometimes design professionals, contractors, plumbers, or framers take it upon themselves to repair RedBuilt™ products.  After all, they have a ton of experience and can save some time and money by taking care of it themselves.  Unfortunately, this perception is wrong and may have dire consequences. The reason Open-Web trusses are so difficult to fix without our knowledge base is each Open-Web truss is designed specifically for each building.  Designs are based on the clear span, design loads and bearing conditions of the building. In order to get an Open-Web truss to work efficiently, we size each pin and steel tube to carry the load necessary. The next time you see an Open-Web truss, take a closer look at it. You will find that the steel tubes and pins in the middle of the truss are lighter (smaller) than the steel tubes and pins on each end of the Open-Web truss… so, if you cut a truss at any given point, alter the bearing conditions, or stiffen a truss, it will not carry the load the way in which it was designed, which may lead to failure. Real Life Failed Fixes: Improper tension splice connection detailing resulting in bottom chord failure. One simple example of a field alteration that seems harmless but can lead to serious problems is the trimming of an Open-Web tail or top chord.  This can seriously affect the strength of a truss, even if trimming only a half inch of wood material.     [caption id="attachment_439" align="alignright" width="300"] Splice of topchord without factory drilled/routed MSR chord material (gaps/poor craftsmanship along with improper materiall).[/caption] People sometimes ask me to explain how a 2x4 flat chord of a Red-L™ Open-Web truss can span over 30', and my short answer is, "It can't".  It's not possible to span 30', the 2x4 only spans from truss pin to truss pin (approximately 2 to 3 ft.').  That is the beauty of an Open-Web truss, the components have to work together or the member is compromised.  One missing pin, one bent steel web, one split or damaged chord could create a system that is no longer a truss but a 2x4 spanning 30'.   [caption id="attachment_436" align="alignleft" width="300"] This truss was improperly altered by cutting the member to avoid duct and which has turned it into a 2x4 spanning 30’.[/caption] To the left is a recent picture showing the end result of an unknown party that took the liberty to shorten a truss span and get creative with the use of a typical solid sawn joist hanger.  This resulted in a 2x4 spanning 30'.  This system is waiting for a solution to prevent a future collapse.  This entire roof will (most likely) need to be replaced due to the overloading of several truss components.  This situation could have been avoided very easily if RedBuilt had been called in the beginning.   At RedBuilt™, we strive to take care of our customers and provide the products and services to help build their future.  As such, we offer a limited lifetime warranty and the services necessary to maintain them.  So, when you see damage or wish to modify RedBuilt™ products, please contact your Technical Representative as soon as possible.   We look forward to working with you to find the best solution to your problem.  


Leave a Reply

Did you notice that on page 4 we are showing table fabrication at our Stayton, OR facility? If so, you have a good eye and you probably work at Stayton! But fabrication looks about the same in Delaware.

By Cornelia Sprung on 2015 04 27.

I am interested in finding out more about RedBuild open web floor joist for residential.

For the past 15 years we have desiign our floors for L480 (even with dimensioal lumber) We pour 10’ basement walls, use TJI’s and end up boxing around mechanicals and spendind to much time and money firestopping and drafrstopping for the new IRC and IBC. Were can I get more info on RedBiuld Open web Joist

By Rolling Rock Construction Co on 2014 07 03.

Not sure why but I found your closing line hilarious. Probably because it’s corny, however it’s probably true as well! Good to know everything went well in the process. Shoppers will definitely be happy Im sure!

By Angela - Chicago Garage Builders on 2013 10 10.

Fantastic win against Scotland. Absalotely great. I curled against your Dad. was a wonderful man. I grew up on the farm where Art and Aggie now live. We have retired to Athabasca an d winter in Mesa, Az. watch all the. Curling to keep cool. best wishes at the Olympics next year. continue success .  Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 03.

Thank you for your support Mr. Ruddick. Team USA and RedBuilt are very appreciative.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Thanks Henry,

I am from Perryvale, my Dad was Ernie Lehto. Would have been great if he could have been here to watch. One tough end against both Sweden and Canada yesterday, but we will bounce back today.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Congratulations on being part of the worlds curling. Are you from the lehto family and which one from perryvale . Very best of luck. We are curling fans and watch all the games. Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 01.

A dedicated redbuilt blog reader.. Thanks for the curling coverage. Congratulations Darren and go team USA.

By bill ruddick on 2013 03 31.

Here is Heinz Mueller’s response:

You are correct, Renaldo. This application would show up more in a commercial structure vs. a residential structure. For an application such as this, I would think a moisture sealant applied to the glulam material would help alleviate the potential issues. That being said, if you decided to go that route you would probably want to start weighing the cost/benefit ratio for using additional products/services (sealant & application) vs. using similar products (LVL, I-joist blocking, etc.) for the blocking/rim board in the floor/roof system. I hope that helps. Thank you for the question and for your interest in the RedBuilt blogs! Heinz

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Here is a great reply that was posted to RedBuilt’s Linked In page:

Renaldo Montenegro, I am going to assume that using Glulams for blocking is more suited for a commercial application rather than a residential application. Thus, the Glulams carrying a very large vertical load from above. In a residential use I would see this as an over kill. Yes, I agree on the moisture content of the Glulams shrinking. Would a moisture sealant applied on the Glulams’ work in this case? A very good article! Thanks for sharing.

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Great to to hear this!!!

By Renaldo Montenegro on 2012 10 17.

Epically informative.  I learned a lot.

By Greg Riley on 2012 10 12.

[...] Posted on October 10, 2012 by [...]

By Deeper is Cheaper | RedBuilt Blog | Michael T. Dai on 2012 10 10.

[...] Call your local representative for a no cost consultation.  Read part 1 here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? (Part 2) | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 18.

[...] Read Part 2 of this article here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 17.

Great article Tom.  Not to intrude, but I would like to expand on how the Redbuilt Design Centers can help the engineer of record.  When I say help, I really mean increase the EOR’s profits while specifying a safer structural roof/floor system.  As I think back to my time as a specifying engineer, specifying Redbuilt’s Open Web trusses saved me time (I can go on about the differences between Redbuilt’s Pin Connected Open Web trusses and plated trusses but that is for another time).  When an EOR saves time, they in essence increase profits.

How does Redbuilt save an EOR time (great question)?  We do all the gravity calculations and truss connections for every loading aspect of a roof/floor system.  All the EOR has to do is specify a truss depth, truss series, show all design loads required and maybe a connection detail or two (with or without the help of a Redbuilt technical representative).  Also, if the EOR requires a PE to stamp both the shop drawing and calculations, our internal designers and engineers will provide technical oversight and assurance that products are used as intended. 

Not only can we save an EOR time but we also provide some assurance and piece of mind.

By Guy Brousseau on 2012 08 23.

Interesting to read about what you are doing, Jason.

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 29.

Sorry for the late response.  I’m glad you have enjoyed the first two.  The third was posted this past week.  It was a fun experience.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 28.

I know that learning involves failure, so thank you for being humble enough to learn.
Thank you, too, for sharing.  I’m enjoying your journey.

By Kathy Bracisco on 2012 07 24.

There is more to come.  This story will continue over the next few weeks and the whole world will know whether I was right or not.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I don’t want to give anything away because this story will continue over the next few weeks.  It was definitely an educational and enjoyable experience that I’m glad to share.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I’m guessing that you accurately predicted the failure.  I’m not an engineer, but you certainly made this understandable enough to read at my level.  Best wishes as you go for Level II!!

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 12.

Very interesting! I’m sure you will be right on.

By Norm Watts on 2012 07 12.

Thanks for the differentation of RedBuilt products.  I forwarded to two customers who wanted to know more about RedForm I joists vs. the “look alikes.”

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 25.

It is great to be a part of the legacy.  Thank you for sharing some perspective on what you are seeing both large-scale in the economy, and how the RedBuilt/legacy Trus Joist business has weathered storms in the past.

By Jeff Jack on 2012 06 23.

I like the blog and appreciate the wisdom in your words.  The focus on thriving vs. surviving is an inspiring shift of perspective.  Not easy, but RedBuilt will thrive without a doubt.  If it were easy everyone would be doing it.  RedBuilt has created a toe hold and a beginning.  Carry on.

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 20.

Hey Kurt -
I enjoyed reading this post about the old Tj and dealing with the last great recession.  I still remember those “PBL” days, wondering as a new hire if I would walk into work one day and find out that I didn’t have a job.  Fortunately that never happened, and I enjoyed the heck out of working for a great company like Trus Joist.
You guys at RedBuilt have got the old Tj culture and believe me, that will help drive your success.  All the best!
- Chris

By Chris Meyer on 2012 06 19.

Thanks Duane!  It certainly can be confusing.

By pdrace on 2012 06 16.

Great article, Paul. Nice job of laying it all out!

By Duane Bolt on 2012 06 15.

What I was impressed by was the load demand against the LVL iJoists while working in a residential market. Ya’ll make good stuff.

By Max Stanford on 2012 06 12.

back to blog

The Destruction: Engineer in Training Open Web Level Two Blog: Part IV

Posted on August 02, 2012 by RedBuilt


by Jason Fitch, Engineer in Training at RedBuilt™ [caption id="attachment_412" align="alignright" width="300"] The aftermath of testing: the sixth web buckled at the profile (far left) which caused the top chord split at the third pin (top middle) and the fifth web to pull out (middle left).[/caption] To test the Open Web Truss, we set up load cells at the ends of the truss and applied load uniformly across it. As load was applied, we could see the truss deflect. Failure occurred when the sixth web, a compression web, buckled at the profile. This caused the top chord to split and the fifth web to pull out. This was not the web I had predicted to fail (the next compression web ended up failing). The truss failed at 324.3plf which was approximately 10,216 pounds combined reactions (I predicted 328.4 plf and 10,345 pounds combined). Reflecting back, I had a great experience with the Hillsboro associates and learned a lot on the trip. Not just about the mechanics of building a truss, but the people who do it. I learned how my design can affect their efficiency as well as what they have to go through to ensure the final truss will be “as designed”. I have also come away with a new respect for them. In the four hours I was there building my truss, I made two mistakes that required things to be redone and fixed. In that time, these associates built multiple trusses without anything needing to be redone. Day in and day out, these associates work hard to build trusses fast and keep the same quality in each product they manufacture. Based on what I learned, they make it look easier than it is. I would like to thank Guy Brousseau and Rex Flegel for the training opportunity they provided for me. Thank you to Mark Scarlett for letting me disrupt his plant and using the equipment and material in order to build this truss. A thank you also goes to Ed Medley for taking the time to walk me through the process, the patience he showed as I made mistakes and the direction he gave me to help to remedy them. Also, thank you to Dwaine Charbonneau for the help in setting up and conducting the test.


Leave a Reply

Did you notice that on page 4 we are showing table fabrication at our Stayton, OR facility? If so, you have a good eye and you probably work at Stayton! But fabrication looks about the same in Delaware.

By Cornelia Sprung on 2015 04 27.

I am interested in finding out more about RedBuild open web floor joist for residential.

For the past 15 years we have desiign our floors for L480 (even with dimensioal lumber) We pour 10’ basement walls, use TJI’s and end up boxing around mechanicals and spendind to much time and money firestopping and drafrstopping for the new IRC and IBC. Were can I get more info on RedBiuld Open web Joist

By Rolling Rock Construction Co on 2014 07 03.

Not sure why but I found your closing line hilarious. Probably because it’s corny, however it’s probably true as well! Good to know everything went well in the process. Shoppers will definitely be happy Im sure!

By Angela - Chicago Garage Builders on 2013 10 10.

Fantastic win against Scotland. Absalotely great. I curled against your Dad. was a wonderful man. I grew up on the farm where Art and Aggie now live. We have retired to Athabasca an d winter in Mesa, Az. watch all the. Curling to keep cool. best wishes at the Olympics next year. continue success .  Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 03.

Thank you for your support Mr. Ruddick. Team USA and RedBuilt are very appreciative.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Thanks Henry,

I am from Perryvale, my Dad was Ernie Lehto. Would have been great if he could have been here to watch. One tough end against both Sweden and Canada yesterday, but we will bounce back today.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Congratulations on being part of the worlds curling. Are you from the lehto family and which one from perryvale . Very best of luck. We are curling fans and watch all the games. Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 01.

A dedicated redbuilt blog reader.. Thanks for the curling coverage. Congratulations Darren and go team USA.

By bill ruddick on 2013 03 31.

Here is Heinz Mueller’s response:

You are correct, Renaldo. This application would show up more in a commercial structure vs. a residential structure. For an application such as this, I would think a moisture sealant applied to the glulam material would help alleviate the potential issues. That being said, if you decided to go that route you would probably want to start weighing the cost/benefit ratio for using additional products/services (sealant & application) vs. using similar products (LVL, I-joist blocking, etc.) for the blocking/rim board in the floor/roof system. I hope that helps. Thank you for the question and for your interest in the RedBuilt blogs! Heinz

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Here is a great reply that was posted to RedBuilt’s Linked In page:

Renaldo Montenegro, I am going to assume that using Glulams for blocking is more suited for a commercial application rather than a residential application. Thus, the Glulams carrying a very large vertical load from above. In a residential use I would see this as an over kill. Yes, I agree on the moisture content of the Glulams shrinking. Would a moisture sealant applied on the Glulams’ work in this case? A very good article! Thanks for sharing.

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Great to to hear this!!!

By Renaldo Montenegro on 2012 10 17.

Epically informative.  I learned a lot.

By Greg Riley on 2012 10 12.

[...] Posted on October 10, 2012 by [...]

By Deeper is Cheaper | RedBuilt Blog | Michael T. Dai on 2012 10 10.

[...] Call your local representative for a no cost consultation.  Read part 1 here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? (Part 2) | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 18.

[...] Read Part 2 of this article here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 17.

Great article Tom.  Not to intrude, but I would like to expand on how the Redbuilt Design Centers can help the engineer of record.  When I say help, I really mean increase the EOR’s profits while specifying a safer structural roof/floor system.  As I think back to my time as a specifying engineer, specifying Redbuilt’s Open Web trusses saved me time (I can go on about the differences between Redbuilt’s Pin Connected Open Web trusses and plated trusses but that is for another time).  When an EOR saves time, they in essence increase profits.

How does Redbuilt save an EOR time (great question)?  We do all the gravity calculations and truss connections for every loading aspect of a roof/floor system.  All the EOR has to do is specify a truss depth, truss series, show all design loads required and maybe a connection detail or two (with or without the help of a Redbuilt technical representative).  Also, if the EOR requires a PE to stamp both the shop drawing and calculations, our internal designers and engineers will provide technical oversight and assurance that products are used as intended. 

Not only can we save an EOR time but we also provide some assurance and piece of mind.

By Guy Brousseau on 2012 08 23.

Interesting to read about what you are doing, Jason.

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 29.

Sorry for the late response.  I’m glad you have enjoyed the first two.  The third was posted this past week.  It was a fun experience.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 28.

I know that learning involves failure, so thank you for being humble enough to learn.
Thank you, too, for sharing.  I’m enjoying your journey.

By Kathy Bracisco on 2012 07 24.

There is more to come.  This story will continue over the next few weeks and the whole world will know whether I was right or not.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I don’t want to give anything away because this story will continue over the next few weeks.  It was definitely an educational and enjoyable experience that I’m glad to share.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I’m guessing that you accurately predicted the failure.  I’m not an engineer, but you certainly made this understandable enough to read at my level.  Best wishes as you go for Level II!!

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 12.

Very interesting! I’m sure you will be right on.

By Norm Watts on 2012 07 12.

Thanks for the differentation of RedBuilt products.  I forwarded to two customers who wanted to know more about RedForm I joists vs. the “look alikes.”

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 25.

It is great to be a part of the legacy.  Thank you for sharing some perspective on what you are seeing both large-scale in the economy, and how the RedBuilt/legacy Trus Joist business has weathered storms in the past.

By Jeff Jack on 2012 06 23.

I like the blog and appreciate the wisdom in your words.  The focus on thriving vs. surviving is an inspiring shift of perspective.  Not easy, but RedBuilt will thrive without a doubt.  If it were easy everyone would be doing it.  RedBuilt has created a toe hold and a beginning.  Carry on.

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 20.

Hey Kurt -
I enjoyed reading this post about the old Tj and dealing with the last great recession.  I still remember those “PBL” days, wondering as a new hire if I would walk into work one day and find out that I didn’t have a job.  Fortunately that never happened, and I enjoyed the heck out of working for a great company like Trus Joist.
You guys at RedBuilt have got the old Tj culture and believe me, that will help drive your success.  All the best!
- Chris

By Chris Meyer on 2012 06 19.

Thanks Duane!  It certainly can be confusing.

By pdrace on 2012 06 16.

Great article, Paul. Nice job of laying it all out!

By Duane Bolt on 2012 06 15.

What I was impressed by was the load demand against the LVL iJoists while working in a residential market. Ya’ll make good stuff.

By Max Stanford on 2012 06 12.

back to blog

Assembling the Truss: Engineer in Training Open Web Level Two Blog: Part III

Posted on July 26, 2012 by RedBuilt


by Jason Fitch, Engineer in Training at RedBuilt™ Since all of the chords and webs were made, and all that was left was to assemble the truss, it would be easy from here.  If you thought that, you, like me, would be wrong! Karl and I started in the middle of the truss.  Ed explained to us how the web layout goes and we assembled the truss components using index pins to line up the webs and other hardware like bearing clips and bridging clips.  After everything was in place, Ed did a quick inspection of the layup, and we rolled the truss forward to the pinners. By this time, Mark Scarlett, the Hillsboro Plant Manager, had joined us.  He told me that we had it easy because of the pneumatic pinners. “We used to drive the pins in with hammers,” he said.  Well, it’s a good thing because although I’m a former framer, it’s been 5 years since I regularly swung a hammer, and I don’t think after all this time I can swing a hammer that much. Even if I could, I like my fingers too much to risk it!  The pinning went fairly quickly and without much problem.  The truss was then rolled outside to be checked for camber and to verify that it was within tolerance. It was spring in Northwestern Oregon, so of course it was raining.  We went outside, and as we rolled the truss under a canopy to check the camber, I noticed some snickering from some of the plant associates.  As we went around to the end of the truss to see what was so funny, it became very apparent, very quickly - there was a bulge in the top of the truss!  The consensus was, “I think you messed up. Probably a web length.”  And I thought everything was going so well…should’ve known better since nothing’s as easy as it looks! We pushed the truss forward to a place where we could inspect the problem.  We found that webs 16 and 18 were switched.  The reason?  When I was writing the web numbers on the webs, I made the 6 look like an 8.  Oops! [caption id="attachment_404" align="alignleft" width="300"] Ed Medley (left) explains to Jason how to remove a wrong web and replace it with the right one as Karl Hendrickx (middle) and Nick David watch on in the rain.[/caption] At this point, I got to learn how to disassemble and reassemble a portion of a truss.  We pushed the truss out from under the canopy, and in the rain, we used pneumatic tools to drive out the pins and remove webs 16 and 18.  Once removed, we switched the locations and reinstalled the pins. Now that the truss was built correctly, we brought it back under the canopy to check for the proper camber and pin-to-pin span.  We found that the truss was within tolerance, and equally as important, I found a new respect for attention to detail and the work our plant associates perform so seamlessly. With a fully (and correctly) assembled truss, we moved on to the fun part…breaking the truss.  We rolled the truss into the testing area and prepared it for its demise. Read about the next part of this series, The Destruction.


Leave a Reply

Did you notice that on page 4 we are showing table fabrication at our Stayton, OR facility? If so, you have a good eye and you probably work at Stayton! But fabrication looks about the same in Delaware.

By Cornelia Sprung on 2015 04 27.

I am interested in finding out more about RedBuild open web floor joist for residential.

For the past 15 years we have desiign our floors for L480 (even with dimensioal lumber) We pour 10’ basement walls, use TJI’s and end up boxing around mechanicals and spendind to much time and money firestopping and drafrstopping for the new IRC and IBC. Were can I get more info on RedBiuld Open web Joist

By Rolling Rock Construction Co on 2014 07 03.

Not sure why but I found your closing line hilarious. Probably because it’s corny, however it’s probably true as well! Good to know everything went well in the process. Shoppers will definitely be happy Im sure!

By Angela - Chicago Garage Builders on 2013 10 10.

Fantastic win against Scotland. Absalotely great. I curled against your Dad. was a wonderful man. I grew up on the farm where Art and Aggie now live. We have retired to Athabasca an d winter in Mesa, Az. watch all the. Curling to keep cool. best wishes at the Olympics next year. continue success .  Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 03.

Thank you for your support Mr. Ruddick. Team USA and RedBuilt are very appreciative.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Thanks Henry,

I am from Perryvale, my Dad was Ernie Lehto. Would have been great if he could have been here to watch. One tough end against both Sweden and Canada yesterday, but we will bounce back today.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Congratulations on being part of the worlds curling. Are you from the lehto family and which one from perryvale . Very best of luck. We are curling fans and watch all the games. Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 01.

A dedicated redbuilt blog reader.. Thanks for the curling coverage. Congratulations Darren and go team USA.

By bill ruddick on 2013 03 31.

Here is Heinz Mueller’s response:

You are correct, Renaldo. This application would show up more in a commercial structure vs. a residential structure. For an application such as this, I would think a moisture sealant applied to the glulam material would help alleviate the potential issues. That being said, if you decided to go that route you would probably want to start weighing the cost/benefit ratio for using additional products/services (sealant & application) vs. using similar products (LVL, I-joist blocking, etc.) for the blocking/rim board in the floor/roof system. I hope that helps. Thank you for the question and for your interest in the RedBuilt blogs! Heinz

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Here is a great reply that was posted to RedBuilt’s Linked In page:

Renaldo Montenegro, I am going to assume that using Glulams for blocking is more suited for a commercial application rather than a residential application. Thus, the Glulams carrying a very large vertical load from above. In a residential use I would see this as an over kill. Yes, I agree on the moisture content of the Glulams shrinking. Would a moisture sealant applied on the Glulams’ work in this case? A very good article! Thanks for sharing.

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Great to to hear this!!!

By Renaldo Montenegro on 2012 10 17.

Epically informative.  I learned a lot.

By Greg Riley on 2012 10 12.

[...] Posted on October 10, 2012 by [...]

By Deeper is Cheaper | RedBuilt Blog | Michael T. Dai on 2012 10 10.

[...] Call your local representative for a no cost consultation.  Read part 1 here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? (Part 2) | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 18.

[...] Read Part 2 of this article here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 17.

Great article Tom.  Not to intrude, but I would like to expand on how the Redbuilt Design Centers can help the engineer of record.  When I say help, I really mean increase the EOR’s profits while specifying a safer structural roof/floor system.  As I think back to my time as a specifying engineer, specifying Redbuilt’s Open Web trusses saved me time (I can go on about the differences between Redbuilt’s Pin Connected Open Web trusses and plated trusses but that is for another time).  When an EOR saves time, they in essence increase profits.

How does Redbuilt save an EOR time (great question)?  We do all the gravity calculations and truss connections for every loading aspect of a roof/floor system.  All the EOR has to do is specify a truss depth, truss series, show all design loads required and maybe a connection detail or two (with or without the help of a Redbuilt technical representative).  Also, if the EOR requires a PE to stamp both the shop drawing and calculations, our internal designers and engineers will provide technical oversight and assurance that products are used as intended. 

Not only can we save an EOR time but we also provide some assurance and piece of mind.

By Guy Brousseau on 2012 08 23.

Interesting to read about what you are doing, Jason.

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 29.

Sorry for the late response.  I’m glad you have enjoyed the first two.  The third was posted this past week.  It was a fun experience.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 28.

I know that learning involves failure, so thank you for being humble enough to learn.
Thank you, too, for sharing.  I’m enjoying your journey.

By Kathy Bracisco on 2012 07 24.

There is more to come.  This story will continue over the next few weeks and the whole world will know whether I was right or not.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I don’t want to give anything away because this story will continue over the next few weeks.  It was definitely an educational and enjoyable experience that I’m glad to share.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I’m guessing that you accurately predicted the failure.  I’m not an engineer, but you certainly made this understandable enough to read at my level.  Best wishes as you go for Level II!!

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 12.

Very interesting! I’m sure you will be right on.

By Norm Watts on 2012 07 12.

Thanks for the differentation of RedBuilt products.  I forwarded to two customers who wanted to know more about RedForm I joists vs. the “look alikes.”

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 25.

It is great to be a part of the legacy.  Thank you for sharing some perspective on what you are seeing both large-scale in the economy, and how the RedBuilt/legacy Trus Joist business has weathered storms in the past.

By Jeff Jack on 2012 06 23.

I like the blog and appreciate the wisdom in your words.  The focus on thriving vs. surviving is an inspiring shift of perspective.  Not easy, but RedBuilt will thrive without a doubt.  If it were easy everyone would be doing it.  RedBuilt has created a toe hold and a beginning.  Carry on.

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 20.

Hey Kurt -
I enjoyed reading this post about the old Tj and dealing with the last great recession.  I still remember those “PBL” days, wondering as a new hire if I would walk into work one day and find out that I didn’t have a job.  Fortunately that never happened, and I enjoyed the heck out of working for a great company like Trus Joist.
You guys at RedBuilt have got the old Tj culture and believe me, that will help drive your success.  All the best!
- Chris

By Chris Meyer on 2012 06 19.

Thanks Duane!  It certainly can be confusing.

By pdrace on 2012 06 16.

Great article, Paul. Nice job of laying it all out!

By Duane Bolt on 2012 06 15.

What I was impressed by was the load demand against the LVL iJoists while working in a residential market. Ya’ll make good stuff.

By Max Stanford on 2012 06 12.

back to blog

Putting Together the Pieces: Engineer in Training Open Web Level Two Blog: Part II

Posted on July 20, 2012 by RedBuilt


by Jason Fitch, Engineer in Training at RedBuilt When I arrived at the Hillsboro Plant, I was introduced to Ed Medley, who would teach me and help me with the construction of my truss.  I don’t know if Ed had pulled the short straw and had to babysit the visitor, or if he had won the coin toss to get a front row seat to watch this designer try to build a truss.  Either way, with a smile on his face, he patiently instructed and watched me as I went through the production process.  I figured my presence at the plant would be like having visitors on the jobsite back when I was framing: It would disrupt the routine as well as give everyone the extra task of watching out for the visitor who doesn’t know the routine or what to watch out for.  I did my best to minimize my impact on the plant by being mindful of and minimizing my disruption the best I could. [caption id="attachment_395" align="alignleft" width="300"] Nick David (left) watches as Ed Medley (back) shows Jason how to set the punch press for different web gauges.[/caption] We started by punching webs.  I was joined by Karl Herinckx from the Hillsboro Engineering office and Nick David from the Stayton plant. Both observed and helped with the construction of my truss.  Ed showed us how the punch worked, as well as how to set the length of the web and the machine settings for different web gauges.  This is where I learned the importance of web pairing, which is the term we use for when consecutive webs are the same length and gauge.  The truss I designed was tapered and intentionally designed so that the number of paired webs was low.  This meant that after almost every web I punched, I had to readjust the length and/or the settings on the machine for different gauges, I had to label each web and then I set them on the cart.  It is clear that pairing the webs is the best practice because it eliminates the need to change the machine, which leads to a faster production process. [caption id="attachment_396" align="alignright" width="225"] Jason adjusting the main panel on the driller to 0.0001.[/caption] With the webs punched, we moved on to drilling the chords.  Due to time constraints, the chords were already finger jointed together and waiting for me.  First, Ed walked me through how to spot the top chord.  Since we were using high grade lumber, there weren’t a lot of knots in it.  This made the spotting process go much easier.  Next, we walked over to the driller, and he showed me how to adjust the stops for the panel lengths.  The main panel had a digital read out, so narrowing down the exact dimension to the 0.0001” was possible.  After making all the adjustments, Ed looked it over and made adjustments to a couple of the “specials” (used where pin-to-pin lengths differ from main panel pin-to-pin lengths), so I concluded my eyeballing to the 0.0001” must not be up to par. Ed then showed me how to set up the driller with the drill and route codes.  He explained how the driller worked and that I was responsible for making sure that I was using the correct panel stops to space the routs and that pin holes line up correctly.  He also let me know that I needed to hold the chord so when the router comes up it does not kick out the chord and that the router may make more than one pass.  No problem, I thought.  The hard part is done, all I need to do is move the chord forward to the proper spots and hold the chord down as the router is going…easy enough.  The first panel went fine but when the router came up for the second panel, the board kicked up.  When the stage stopped I told Ed, “The board kicked up and I’m pretty sure the rout is messed up.”  He rolled the chord forward to a safe place for him to feel the rout and said, “Let’s take a look.”  As he felt the rout he said, “Wow, I don’t think I’ve ever seen a missed rout this bad.”  Well there goes my plant associate of the year award.  We cut the chord off where the last rout was and pushed it back up to see if there was enough chord to try again.  As we flipped the cut piece over to see how bad it was, the chord revealed that I had let it shift enough so it was not just an extra wide rout, but that it moved far enough to have two routs. We went back to the chord and re-measured and re-spotted it . We were amazed to find that there was just enough unaffected chord and we could still use it!  Ed made sure to remind me that I need to hold the chord in place this time because if I messed up again, we would need to make a new chord.  We re-started the drill cycle, and this time I went through it without another mistake.  Then we used the top chord we just made to spot the bottom chord and we drilled the proper camber plate for the bottom chord. With the chords and webs made, it was time to assemble the truss. Read about the next part of this series, Assembling the Truss.


Leave a Reply

Did you notice that on page 4 we are showing table fabrication at our Stayton, OR facility? If so, you have a good eye and you probably work at Stayton! But fabrication looks about the same in Delaware.

By Cornelia Sprung on 2015 04 27.

I am interested in finding out more about RedBuild open web floor joist for residential.

For the past 15 years we have desiign our floors for L480 (even with dimensioal lumber) We pour 10’ basement walls, use TJI’s and end up boxing around mechanicals and spendind to much time and money firestopping and drafrstopping for the new IRC and IBC. Were can I get more info on RedBiuld Open web Joist

By Rolling Rock Construction Co on 2014 07 03.

Not sure why but I found your closing line hilarious. Probably because it’s corny, however it’s probably true as well! Good to know everything went well in the process. Shoppers will definitely be happy Im sure!

By Angela - Chicago Garage Builders on 2013 10 10.

Fantastic win against Scotland. Absalotely great. I curled against your Dad. was a wonderful man. I grew up on the farm where Art and Aggie now live. We have retired to Athabasca an d winter in Mesa, Az. watch all the. Curling to keep cool. best wishes at the Olympics next year. continue success .  Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 03.

Thank you for your support Mr. Ruddick. Team USA and RedBuilt are very appreciative.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Thanks Henry,

I am from Perryvale, my Dad was Ernie Lehto. Would have been great if he could have been here to watch. One tough end against both Sweden and Canada yesterday, but we will bounce back today.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Congratulations on being part of the worlds curling. Are you from the lehto family and which one from perryvale . Very best of luck. We are curling fans and watch all the games. Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 01.

A dedicated redbuilt blog reader.. Thanks for the curling coverage. Congratulations Darren and go team USA.

By bill ruddick on 2013 03 31.

Here is Heinz Mueller’s response:

You are correct, Renaldo. This application would show up more in a commercial structure vs. a residential structure. For an application such as this, I would think a moisture sealant applied to the glulam material would help alleviate the potential issues. That being said, if you decided to go that route you would probably want to start weighing the cost/benefit ratio for using additional products/services (sealant & application) vs. using similar products (LVL, I-joist blocking, etc.) for the blocking/rim board in the floor/roof system. I hope that helps. Thank you for the question and for your interest in the RedBuilt blogs! Heinz

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Here is a great reply that was posted to RedBuilt’s Linked In page:

Renaldo Montenegro, I am going to assume that using Glulams for blocking is more suited for a commercial application rather than a residential application. Thus, the Glulams carrying a very large vertical load from above. In a residential use I would see this as an over kill. Yes, I agree on the moisture content of the Glulams shrinking. Would a moisture sealant applied on the Glulams’ work in this case? A very good article! Thanks for sharing.

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Great to to hear this!!!

By Renaldo Montenegro on 2012 10 17.

Epically informative.  I learned a lot.

By Greg Riley on 2012 10 12.

[...] Posted on October 10, 2012 by [...]

By Deeper is Cheaper | RedBuilt Blog | Michael T. Dai on 2012 10 10.

[...] Call your local representative for a no cost consultation.  Read part 1 here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? (Part 2) | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 18.

[...] Read Part 2 of this article here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 17.

Great article Tom.  Not to intrude, but I would like to expand on how the Redbuilt Design Centers can help the engineer of record.  When I say help, I really mean increase the EOR’s profits while specifying a safer structural roof/floor system.  As I think back to my time as a specifying engineer, specifying Redbuilt’s Open Web trusses saved me time (I can go on about the differences between Redbuilt’s Pin Connected Open Web trusses and plated trusses but that is for another time).  When an EOR saves time, they in essence increase profits.

How does Redbuilt save an EOR time (great question)?  We do all the gravity calculations and truss connections for every loading aspect of a roof/floor system.  All the EOR has to do is specify a truss depth, truss series, show all design loads required and maybe a connection detail or two (with or without the help of a Redbuilt technical representative).  Also, if the EOR requires a PE to stamp both the shop drawing and calculations, our internal designers and engineers will provide technical oversight and assurance that products are used as intended. 

Not only can we save an EOR time but we also provide some assurance and piece of mind.

By Guy Brousseau on 2012 08 23.

Interesting to read about what you are doing, Jason.

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 29.

Sorry for the late response.  I’m glad you have enjoyed the first two.  The third was posted this past week.  It was a fun experience.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 28.

I know that learning involves failure, so thank you for being humble enough to learn.
Thank you, too, for sharing.  I’m enjoying your journey.

By Kathy Bracisco on 2012 07 24.

There is more to come.  This story will continue over the next few weeks and the whole world will know whether I was right or not.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I don’t want to give anything away because this story will continue over the next few weeks.  It was definitely an educational and enjoyable experience that I’m glad to share.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I’m guessing that you accurately predicted the failure.  I’m not an engineer, but you certainly made this understandable enough to read at my level.  Best wishes as you go for Level II!!

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 12.

Very interesting! I’m sure you will be right on.

By Norm Watts on 2012 07 12.

Thanks for the differentation of RedBuilt products.  I forwarded to two customers who wanted to know more about RedForm I joists vs. the “look alikes.”

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 25.

It is great to be a part of the legacy.  Thank you for sharing some perspective on what you are seeing both large-scale in the economy, and how the RedBuilt/legacy Trus Joist business has weathered storms in the past.

By Jeff Jack on 2012 06 23.

I like the blog and appreciate the wisdom in your words.  The focus on thriving vs. surviving is an inspiring shift of perspective.  Not easy, but RedBuilt will thrive without a doubt.  If it were easy everyone would be doing it.  RedBuilt has created a toe hold and a beginning.  Carry on.

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 20.

Hey Kurt -
I enjoyed reading this post about the old Tj and dealing with the last great recession.  I still remember those “PBL” days, wondering as a new hire if I would walk into work one day and find out that I didn’t have a job.  Fortunately that never happened, and I enjoyed the heck out of working for a great company like Trus Joist.
You guys at RedBuilt have got the old Tj culture and believe me, that will help drive your success.  All the best!
- Chris

By Chris Meyer on 2012 06 19.

Thanks Duane!  It certainly can be confusing.

By pdrace on 2012 06 16.

Great article, Paul. Nice job of laying it all out!

By Duane Bolt on 2012 06 15.

What I was impressed by was the load demand against the LVL iJoists while working in a residential market. Ya’ll make good stuff.

By Max Stanford on 2012 06 12.

back to blog

More than a pretty face… why RedBuilt sponsors professional seminars.

Posted on July 17, 2012 by RedBuilt


by Soren Jensen, Technical Representative for RedBuilt [caption id="attachment_366" align="alignleft" width="71"] Soren Jensen, Technical Representative for RedBuilt in the North Bay Area[/caption] On May 23, RedBuilt™ participated as a sponsor of a seismic design seminar presented by the Structural Engineers Association of Central California (SEAOCC)inWest Sacramento. The seminar provided an opportunity for participants to learn the practical application of specific structural/seismic provisions from the recently updated SEAOCC Seismic Design Manuals. As the Technical Representative for the neighboring North Bay Area, I was able to spend the day at the seminar, meeting people and sharing information at the RedBuilt™ exhibit. RedBuilt™ participates in and sponsors design community events like this one to continue our learning (individually and as a company), to provide support to our engineering community and to offer other resources we have to other customers. Continual Learning Many of our Technical Representatives are engineers themselves and like to attend these events to see old friends, develop new relationships and enjoy associating with other engineers. We also like to stay current on trends and topics in engineering, construction and design so that we can continually provide the best service possible. Community Support As an engineered wood products manufacturer, RedBuilt™ is glad to support the design and engineering community. In addition to having an extremely knowledgeable team of Technical Representatives (the average tenure at RedBuilt™ is 17 years), RedBuilt™ is the only engineered wood manufacturer with a team of engineers to support our sales team as well as our customers from specification all the way through to the end of a project.  We appreciate  both the design and engineering community and want to help them succeed. Offer Resources When a RedBuilt™ representative attends a seminar or conference, he or she is not only there to support engineering associations, but also to remind engineers that RedBuilt™ and our Representatives are an excellent resource for design assistance and best system analysis. We are available to answer questions and provide guidance at any stage of a project and have expertise in the areas of budgeting, detailing, constructability and product application. We work with both the construction teams in the field and design teams in their office, making us a valuable resource for all parties involved in the design and construction of your projects. Congratulations to SEAOCC for a successful event and we look forward to seeing you at the next conference, where we hope you’ll stop by and say hello!  


Leave a Reply

Did you notice that on page 4 we are showing table fabrication at our Stayton, OR facility? If so, you have a good eye and you probably work at Stayton! But fabrication looks about the same in Delaware.

By Cornelia Sprung on 2015 04 27.

I am interested in finding out more about RedBuild open web floor joist for residential.

For the past 15 years we have desiign our floors for L480 (even with dimensioal lumber) We pour 10’ basement walls, use TJI’s and end up boxing around mechanicals and spendind to much time and money firestopping and drafrstopping for the new IRC and IBC. Were can I get more info on RedBiuld Open web Joist

By Rolling Rock Construction Co on 2014 07 03.

Not sure why but I found your closing line hilarious. Probably because it’s corny, however it’s probably true as well! Good to know everything went well in the process. Shoppers will definitely be happy Im sure!

By Angela - Chicago Garage Builders on 2013 10 10.

Fantastic win against Scotland. Absalotely great. I curled against your Dad. was a wonderful man. I grew up on the farm where Art and Aggie now live. We have retired to Athabasca an d winter in Mesa, Az. watch all the. Curling to keep cool. best wishes at the Olympics next year. continue success .  Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 03.

Thank you for your support Mr. Ruddick. Team USA and RedBuilt are very appreciative.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Thanks Henry,

I am from Perryvale, my Dad was Ernie Lehto. Would have been great if he could have been here to watch. One tough end against both Sweden and Canada yesterday, but we will bounce back today.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Congratulations on being part of the worlds curling. Are you from the lehto family and which one from perryvale . Very best of luck. We are curling fans and watch all the games. Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 01.

A dedicated redbuilt blog reader.. Thanks for the curling coverage. Congratulations Darren and go team USA.

By bill ruddick on 2013 03 31.

Here is Heinz Mueller’s response:

You are correct, Renaldo. This application would show up more in a commercial structure vs. a residential structure. For an application such as this, I would think a moisture sealant applied to the glulam material would help alleviate the potential issues. That being said, if you decided to go that route you would probably want to start weighing the cost/benefit ratio for using additional products/services (sealant & application) vs. using similar products (LVL, I-joist blocking, etc.) for the blocking/rim board in the floor/roof system. I hope that helps. Thank you for the question and for your interest in the RedBuilt blogs! Heinz

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Here is a great reply that was posted to RedBuilt’s Linked In page:

Renaldo Montenegro, I am going to assume that using Glulams for blocking is more suited for a commercial application rather than a residential application. Thus, the Glulams carrying a very large vertical load from above. In a residential use I would see this as an over kill. Yes, I agree on the moisture content of the Glulams shrinking. Would a moisture sealant applied on the Glulams’ work in this case? A very good article! Thanks for sharing.

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Great to to hear this!!!

By Renaldo Montenegro on 2012 10 17.

Epically informative.  I learned a lot.

By Greg Riley on 2012 10 12.

[...] Posted on October 10, 2012 by [...]

By Deeper is Cheaper | RedBuilt Blog | Michael T. Dai on 2012 10 10.

[...] Call your local representative for a no cost consultation.  Read part 1 here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? (Part 2) | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 18.

[...] Read Part 2 of this article here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 17.

Great article Tom.  Not to intrude, but I would like to expand on how the Redbuilt Design Centers can help the engineer of record.  When I say help, I really mean increase the EOR’s profits while specifying a safer structural roof/floor system.  As I think back to my time as a specifying engineer, specifying Redbuilt’s Open Web trusses saved me time (I can go on about the differences between Redbuilt’s Pin Connected Open Web trusses and plated trusses but that is for another time).  When an EOR saves time, they in essence increase profits.

How does Redbuilt save an EOR time (great question)?  We do all the gravity calculations and truss connections for every loading aspect of a roof/floor system.  All the EOR has to do is specify a truss depth, truss series, show all design loads required and maybe a connection detail or two (with or without the help of a Redbuilt technical representative).  Also, if the EOR requires a PE to stamp both the shop drawing and calculations, our internal designers and engineers will provide technical oversight and assurance that products are used as intended. 

Not only can we save an EOR time but we also provide some assurance and piece of mind.

By Guy Brousseau on 2012 08 23.

Interesting to read about what you are doing, Jason.

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 29.

Sorry for the late response.  I’m glad you have enjoyed the first two.  The third was posted this past week.  It was a fun experience.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 28.

I know that learning involves failure, so thank you for being humble enough to learn.
Thank you, too, for sharing.  I’m enjoying your journey.

By Kathy Bracisco on 2012 07 24.

There is more to come.  This story will continue over the next few weeks and the whole world will know whether I was right or not.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I don’t want to give anything away because this story will continue over the next few weeks.  It was definitely an educational and enjoyable experience that I’m glad to share.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I’m guessing that you accurately predicted the failure.  I’m not an engineer, but you certainly made this understandable enough to read at my level.  Best wishes as you go for Level II!!

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 12.

Very interesting! I’m sure you will be right on.

By Norm Watts on 2012 07 12.

Thanks for the differentation of RedBuilt products.  I forwarded to two customers who wanted to know more about RedForm I joists vs. the “look alikes.”

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 25.

It is great to be a part of the legacy.  Thank you for sharing some perspective on what you are seeing both large-scale in the economy, and how the RedBuilt/legacy Trus Joist business has weathered storms in the past.

By Jeff Jack on 2012 06 23.

I like the blog and appreciate the wisdom in your words.  The focus on thriving vs. surviving is an inspiring shift of perspective.  Not easy, but RedBuilt will thrive without a doubt.  If it were easy everyone would be doing it.  RedBuilt has created a toe hold and a beginning.  Carry on.

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 20.

Hey Kurt -
I enjoyed reading this post about the old Tj and dealing with the last great recession.  I still remember those “PBL” days, wondering as a new hire if I would walk into work one day and find out that I didn’t have a job.  Fortunately that never happened, and I enjoyed the heck out of working for a great company like Trus Joist.
You guys at RedBuilt have got the old Tj culture and believe me, that will help drive your success.  All the best!
- Chris

By Chris Meyer on 2012 06 19.

Thanks Duane!  It certainly can be confusing.

By pdrace on 2012 06 16.

Great article, Paul. Nice job of laying it all out!

By Duane Bolt on 2012 06 15.

What I was impressed by was the load demand against the LVL iJoists while working in a residential market. Ya’ll make good stuff.

By Max Stanford on 2012 06 12.

back to blog

The Beginning – A “Good” Design: Engineer in Training Open Web Level Two Blog: Part I

Posted on July 11, 2012 by RedBuilt


by Jason Fitch, Engineer in Training at RedBuilt (Editor’s Note: There are three levels of open web certification.  Level I is the introductory understanding of how to use software, and read and understand the output.  Level II provides the understanding of how to manipulate designs within the software for things like fixed panels, header clips, etc.  Most designers are Level II certified.  Level III certification is the highest level of certification and entails designing custom trusses and profiles by hand.  Level III certified designers are the Yoda’s of open web truss design, and there are only a handful of them.  Jason is providing a series of blogs about his experience in attaining Level II certification.  We are looking forward to the day he can blog about his Yoda [Level III] certification!) [caption id="attachment_351" align="alignleft" width="168"] Jason Fitch, EIT at RedBuilt[/caption] I am an EIT at the Boise Engineering office and have been working on my Open Web Level II certification.  In order to get my certification, I had to design, build and test a truss.  Since the Boise Design Center is not a manufacturing site, I was sent to our Open Web plant in Hillsboro, OR for the build/break part of my training. This was very exciting for me because getting a chance to travel to the plant and not only see, but to also participate in the making of a truss is not something I get the opportunity to experience very often. As someone who started their career in this industry as a framer, I was looking forward to being able to physically put something together, and of course, I was equally excited to test (code for break) what I make.  As a former little boy, I still have this excitement and urge to break things, and this time it was not only okay but it was required that I break it, and I was paid to do it, too! The first step was designing my truss. Rex Flegel, who has been in charge of my Open Web Level II training, came up with some ideas.  With the help of Dave Vanderzanden from the Hillsboro Office, we compiled a “good” truss design.  I should qualify the “good” design.  It was not good from a manufacturing or efficiency of design aspect, but it was good as far as a teaching tool.  This truss was designed to have multiple aspects that tend to make manufacturing difficult.  In this case, a tapered truss with a very shallow end depth was selected.  There were also some tight web to web angles (at the limits), and it also included extra hardware that had to be squeezed into a rout. Once the truss was designed, I had to then predict the failure.  The design output stated that there would be a pin failure, or a Hankinson failure [Wood has an allowable stress both perpendicular to grain and parallel to grain. Hankinson’s formula is used to find the allowable stress at an angle.  Hankinson failure would result in pin bearing force at an angle which exceeds the allowable based on Hankinson’s formula.].  Knowing a couple of things like:

  • The design was based on 2700 fb MSR (machine stress rated) solid sawn lumber chords but the plant uses 2850 fb MSR
  • Wood is pretty good for short-term load durations like the truss would experience in a test
I decided that the wood would not fail first.  This eliminated the panel and pin controls.  Also knowing that slender steel members do well in tension and not as well in compression, I made my prediction that a steel web would fail in compression.  And not just any web, but the longest, lightest gauge compression web would fail by buckling.  As a result of this predication, I estimated the ultimate load on the truss to be 328.4 plf (or 10,345# total of both reactions). Now that I had all my preparations made, and everything was ready, I made my trip out to Hillsboro to build/break my truss design. Read about the next part of my training, Putting Together the Pieces.


Leave a Reply

Did you notice that on page 4 we are showing table fabrication at our Stayton, OR facility? If so, you have a good eye and you probably work at Stayton! But fabrication looks about the same in Delaware.

By Cornelia Sprung on 2015 04 27.

I am interested in finding out more about RedBuild open web floor joist for residential.

For the past 15 years we have desiign our floors for L480 (even with dimensioal lumber) We pour 10’ basement walls, use TJI’s and end up boxing around mechanicals and spendind to much time and money firestopping and drafrstopping for the new IRC and IBC. Were can I get more info on RedBiuld Open web Joist

By Rolling Rock Construction Co on 2014 07 03.

Not sure why but I found your closing line hilarious. Probably because it’s corny, however it’s probably true as well! Good to know everything went well in the process. Shoppers will definitely be happy Im sure!

By Angela - Chicago Garage Builders on 2013 10 10.

Fantastic win against Scotland. Absalotely great. I curled against your Dad. was a wonderful man. I grew up on the farm where Art and Aggie now live. We have retired to Athabasca an d winter in Mesa, Az. watch all the. Curling to keep cool. best wishes at the Olympics next year. continue success .  Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 03.

Thank you for your support Mr. Ruddick. Team USA and RedBuilt are very appreciative.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Thanks Henry,

I am from Perryvale, my Dad was Ernie Lehto. Would have been great if he could have been here to watch. One tough end against both Sweden and Canada yesterday, but we will bounce back today.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Congratulations on being part of the worlds curling. Are you from the lehto family and which one from perryvale . Very best of luck. We are curling fans and watch all the games. Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 01.

A dedicated redbuilt blog reader.. Thanks for the curling coverage. Congratulations Darren and go team USA.

By bill ruddick on 2013 03 31.

Here is Heinz Mueller’s response:

You are correct, Renaldo. This application would show up more in a commercial structure vs. a residential structure. For an application such as this, I would think a moisture sealant applied to the glulam material would help alleviate the potential issues. That being said, if you decided to go that route you would probably want to start weighing the cost/benefit ratio for using additional products/services (sealant & application) vs. using similar products (LVL, I-joist blocking, etc.) for the blocking/rim board in the floor/roof system. I hope that helps. Thank you for the question and for your interest in the RedBuilt blogs! Heinz

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Here is a great reply that was posted to RedBuilt’s Linked In page:

Renaldo Montenegro, I am going to assume that using Glulams for blocking is more suited for a commercial application rather than a residential application. Thus, the Glulams carrying a very large vertical load from above. In a residential use I would see this as an over kill. Yes, I agree on the moisture content of the Glulams shrinking. Would a moisture sealant applied on the Glulams’ work in this case? A very good article! Thanks for sharing.

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Great to to hear this!!!

By Renaldo Montenegro on 2012 10 17.

Epically informative.  I learned a lot.

By Greg Riley on 2012 10 12.

[...] Posted on October 10, 2012 by [...]

By Deeper is Cheaper | RedBuilt Blog | Michael T. Dai on 2012 10 10.

[...] Call your local representative for a no cost consultation.  Read part 1 here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? (Part 2) | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 18.

[...] Read Part 2 of this article here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 17.

Great article Tom.  Not to intrude, but I would like to expand on how the Redbuilt Design Centers can help the engineer of record.  When I say help, I really mean increase the EOR’s profits while specifying a safer structural roof/floor system.  As I think back to my time as a specifying engineer, specifying Redbuilt’s Open Web trusses saved me time (I can go on about the differences between Redbuilt’s Pin Connected Open Web trusses and plated trusses but that is for another time).  When an EOR saves time, they in essence increase profits.

How does Redbuilt save an EOR time (great question)?  We do all the gravity calculations and truss connections for every loading aspect of a roof/floor system.  All the EOR has to do is specify a truss depth, truss series, show all design loads required and maybe a connection detail or two (with or without the help of a Redbuilt technical representative).  Also, if the EOR requires a PE to stamp both the shop drawing and calculations, our internal designers and engineers will provide technical oversight and assurance that products are used as intended. 

Not only can we save an EOR time but we also provide some assurance and piece of mind.

By Guy Brousseau on 2012 08 23.

Interesting to read about what you are doing, Jason.

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 29.

Sorry for the late response.  I’m glad you have enjoyed the first two.  The third was posted this past week.  It was a fun experience.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 28.

I know that learning involves failure, so thank you for being humble enough to learn.
Thank you, too, for sharing.  I’m enjoying your journey.

By Kathy Bracisco on 2012 07 24.

There is more to come.  This story will continue over the next few weeks and the whole world will know whether I was right or not.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I don’t want to give anything away because this story will continue over the next few weeks.  It was definitely an educational and enjoyable experience that I’m glad to share.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I’m guessing that you accurately predicted the failure.  I’m not an engineer, but you certainly made this understandable enough to read at my level.  Best wishes as you go for Level II!!

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 12.

Very interesting! I’m sure you will be right on.

By Norm Watts on 2012 07 12.

Thanks for the differentation of RedBuilt products.  I forwarded to two customers who wanted to know more about RedForm I joists vs. the “look alikes.”

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 25.

It is great to be a part of the legacy.  Thank you for sharing some perspective on what you are seeing both large-scale in the economy, and how the RedBuilt/legacy Trus Joist business has weathered storms in the past.

By Jeff Jack on 2012 06 23.

I like the blog and appreciate the wisdom in your words.  The focus on thriving vs. surviving is an inspiring shift of perspective.  Not easy, but RedBuilt will thrive without a doubt.  If it were easy everyone would be doing it.  RedBuilt has created a toe hold and a beginning.  Carry on.

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 20.

Hey Kurt -
I enjoyed reading this post about the old Tj and dealing with the last great recession.  I still remember those “PBL” days, wondering as a new hire if I would walk into work one day and find out that I didn’t have a job.  Fortunately that never happened, and I enjoyed the heck out of working for a great company like Trus Joist.
You guys at RedBuilt have got the old Tj culture and believe me, that will help drive your success.  All the best!
- Chris

By Chris Meyer on 2012 06 19.

Thanks Duane!  It certainly can be confusing.

By pdrace on 2012 06 16.

Great article, Paul. Nice job of laying it all out!

By Duane Bolt on 2012 06 15.

What I was impressed by was the load demand against the LVL iJoists while working in a residential market. Ya’ll make good stuff.

By Max Stanford on 2012 06 12.

back to blog

Southern Pine Design Value Reductions

Posted on July 03, 2012 by RedBuilt


by Dwaine Charbonneau, P.E. at RedBuilt The good news is that I have another story I can tell my grandkids someday: "I remember when a number two Southern Pine two-by-four was good for 1500 psi. Now that was a stout piece of lumber!" The bad news, of course – aside from the alarming realization that I really need some better stories to tell my grandkids – is that an SP #2 2x4 isn't as strong as it used to be, as of June 1. This is the sort of news that doesn't exactly go viral, much less pique the curiosity of toddlers, but if you're into the design of wood structures, it's likely you've heard about it. And since you're perusing the RedBuilt™ blog, you may be wondering how the drop in certain design values for certain sizes and grades of Southern Pine (SP) affects RedBuilt™ engineered wood products. We, in turn, are curious how this might affect you and others in the structural design community. Before I tell you what this means to RedBuilt™, allow me to point to a few aspects of this story that are sometimes neglected. These significant reductions in SP design values affect more than just the SP #2 2x4. The decreases involve seven grades and six sizes of lumber, from No. 2 Dense through Utility, from 2x2 through 4x4. The affected design values include those that are related to axial stress, such as bending (about a 30% loss), tension (20%), and compression (35%), but not those that are associated with specific gravity, such as shear or compression perpendicular to grain. In all, you'll find 50 revised numbers in Table 4B of the NDS Supplement: Design Values for Wood Construction. Given the section sizes of lumber involved, we're not looking at a typical floor joist or roof rafter, except for light loads or short spans. More common uses for 2x4 and 4x4 members that call upon bending and axial strength include:

  • Studs and posts: combined bending and axial
  • Braces: tension and compression
  • Top plates: diaphragm chord axial forces, bending between studs
  • Connections: net section and group tear-out
Another use that may come to mind when thinking about combined bending and axial forces is truss chords. Indeed, for those who build trusses with visual grades of Southern Pine, the decline in these values may force truss designers to consider a number of alternatives. For instance, you might throw in another web to shorten the top chord panel. Or you might bump the grade to No. 1, or the size to 2x6. Or you might eschew the visual grades altogether and go with MSR or MEL mechanical grades. For example, 1500f-1.6E MSR is a good substitute for the former SP #2 2x4, if you can get it. The effect of the SP design value reductions on RedBuilt™ products is minimal precisely because we use mechanical grades in our trusses. A 1500f-1.6E piece of MSR is always good for 1500 psi in bending – not to mention that we use nothing less than 2100f-1.8E MSR in our trusses. The RedLam LVL we use in our I-joist chords is also qualified and controlled to strength, rather than visual standards. RedBuilt™ may provide visual grades in accessories, such as blocking, where axial stresses are nonexistent. A minor change in our bridging for 4-foot-on-center truss systems is possible once the other shoe drops, so we're keeping a close eye on design value revisions that are in the works. Reductions for more sizes and grades of Southern Pine and Mixed Southern Pine – potentially anything in NDS Table 4B – may follow the ALSC Board of Review meeting in October. Exactly when or by how much, nobody knows. So what does this mean to you? Have the reductions in design values for these sizes and grades of Southern Pine affected your work? Has it forced a change in grade, size, or species, or no changes at all? Have you been pro-active with the adjustments, or did you wait until June 1? Does this affect your confidence in visual grades, or cause you to re-assess your use of visual versus mechanical grades in your designs? It's an interesting topic in many ways, so please don't hesitate to share your thoughts. Here are a few related links. A good Q&A article from Coastal Contractor: http://www.remodeling.hw.net/products/southern-pine-2x4-lumber-downgraded.aspx?cid=RDU:061512:FULL An in-depth slideshow provided by Woodworks: http://woodworks.org/wp-content/uploads/SFPA-Design-Values.pdf Amended design values and span tables for the NDS, IBC, and IRC: http://awc.org/publications/update/designvaluechanges.html


Leave a Reply

Did you notice that on page 4 we are showing table fabrication at our Stayton, OR facility? If so, you have a good eye and you probably work at Stayton! But fabrication looks about the same in Delaware.

By Cornelia Sprung on 2015 04 27.

I am interested in finding out more about RedBuild open web floor joist for residential.

For the past 15 years we have desiign our floors for L480 (even with dimensioal lumber) We pour 10’ basement walls, use TJI’s and end up boxing around mechanicals and spendind to much time and money firestopping and drafrstopping for the new IRC and IBC. Were can I get more info on RedBiuld Open web Joist

By Rolling Rock Construction Co on 2014 07 03.

Not sure why but I found your closing line hilarious. Probably because it’s corny, however it’s probably true as well! Good to know everything went well in the process. Shoppers will definitely be happy Im sure!

By Angela - Chicago Garage Builders on 2013 10 10.

Fantastic win against Scotland. Absalotely great. I curled against your Dad. was a wonderful man. I grew up on the farm where Art and Aggie now live. We have retired to Athabasca an d winter in Mesa, Az. watch all the. Curling to keep cool. best wishes at the Olympics next year. continue success .  Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 03.

Thank you for your support Mr. Ruddick. Team USA and RedBuilt are very appreciative.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Thanks Henry,

I am from Perryvale, my Dad was Ernie Lehto. Would have been great if he could have been here to watch. One tough end against both Sweden and Canada yesterday, but we will bounce back today.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Congratulations on being part of the worlds curling. Are you from the lehto family and which one from perryvale . Very best of luck. We are curling fans and watch all the games. Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 01.

A dedicated redbuilt blog reader.. Thanks for the curling coverage. Congratulations Darren and go team USA.

By bill ruddick on 2013 03 31.

Here is Heinz Mueller’s response:

You are correct, Renaldo. This application would show up more in a commercial structure vs. a residential structure. For an application such as this, I would think a moisture sealant applied to the glulam material would help alleviate the potential issues. That being said, if you decided to go that route you would probably want to start weighing the cost/benefit ratio for using additional products/services (sealant & application) vs. using similar products (LVL, I-joist blocking, etc.) for the blocking/rim board in the floor/roof system. I hope that helps. Thank you for the question and for your interest in the RedBuilt blogs! Heinz

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Here is a great reply that was posted to RedBuilt’s Linked In page:

Renaldo Montenegro, I am going to assume that using Glulams for blocking is more suited for a commercial application rather than a residential application. Thus, the Glulams carrying a very large vertical load from above. In a residential use I would see this as an over kill. Yes, I agree on the moisture content of the Glulams shrinking. Would a moisture sealant applied on the Glulams’ work in this case? A very good article! Thanks for sharing.

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Great to to hear this!!!

By Renaldo Montenegro on 2012 10 17.

Epically informative.  I learned a lot.

By Greg Riley on 2012 10 12.

[...] Posted on October 10, 2012 by [...]

By Deeper is Cheaper | RedBuilt Blog | Michael T. Dai on 2012 10 10.

[...] Call your local representative for a no cost consultation.  Read part 1 here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? (Part 2) | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 18.

[...] Read Part 2 of this article here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 17.

Great article Tom.  Not to intrude, but I would like to expand on how the Redbuilt Design Centers can help the engineer of record.  When I say help, I really mean increase the EOR’s profits while specifying a safer structural roof/floor system.  As I think back to my time as a specifying engineer, specifying Redbuilt’s Open Web trusses saved me time (I can go on about the differences between Redbuilt’s Pin Connected Open Web trusses and plated trusses but that is for another time).  When an EOR saves time, they in essence increase profits.

How does Redbuilt save an EOR time (great question)?  We do all the gravity calculations and truss connections for every loading aspect of a roof/floor system.  All the EOR has to do is specify a truss depth, truss series, show all design loads required and maybe a connection detail or two (with or without the help of a Redbuilt technical representative).  Also, if the EOR requires a PE to stamp both the shop drawing and calculations, our internal designers and engineers will provide technical oversight and assurance that products are used as intended. 

Not only can we save an EOR time but we also provide some assurance and piece of mind.

By Guy Brousseau on 2012 08 23.

Interesting to read about what you are doing, Jason.

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 29.

Sorry for the late response.  I’m glad you have enjoyed the first two.  The third was posted this past week.  It was a fun experience.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 28.

I know that learning involves failure, so thank you for being humble enough to learn.
Thank you, too, for sharing.  I’m enjoying your journey.

By Kathy Bracisco on 2012 07 24.

There is more to come.  This story will continue over the next few weeks and the whole world will know whether I was right or not.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I don’t want to give anything away because this story will continue over the next few weeks.  It was definitely an educational and enjoyable experience that I’m glad to share.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I’m guessing that you accurately predicted the failure.  I’m not an engineer, but you certainly made this understandable enough to read at my level.  Best wishes as you go for Level II!!

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 12.

Very interesting! I’m sure you will be right on.

By Norm Watts on 2012 07 12.

Thanks for the differentation of RedBuilt products.  I forwarded to two customers who wanted to know more about RedForm I joists vs. the “look alikes.”

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 25.

It is great to be a part of the legacy.  Thank you for sharing some perspective on what you are seeing both large-scale in the economy, and how the RedBuilt/legacy Trus Joist business has weathered storms in the past.

By Jeff Jack on 2012 06 23.

I like the blog and appreciate the wisdom in your words.  The focus on thriving vs. surviving is an inspiring shift of perspective.  Not easy, but RedBuilt will thrive without a doubt.  If it were easy everyone would be doing it.  RedBuilt has created a toe hold and a beginning.  Carry on.

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 20.

Hey Kurt -
I enjoyed reading this post about the old Tj and dealing with the last great recession.  I still remember those “PBL” days, wondering as a new hire if I would walk into work one day and find out that I didn’t have a job.  Fortunately that never happened, and I enjoyed the heck out of working for a great company like Trus Joist.
You guys at RedBuilt have got the old Tj culture and believe me, that will help drive your success.  All the best!
- Chris

By Chris Meyer on 2012 06 19.

Thanks Duane!  It certainly can be confusing.

By pdrace on 2012 06 16.

Great article, Paul. Nice job of laying it all out!

By Duane Bolt on 2012 06 15.

What I was impressed by was the load demand against the LVL iJoists while working in a residential market. Ya’ll make good stuff.

By Max Stanford on 2012 06 12.

back to blog

LEED 2012/ LEED v4 Status Update

Posted on June 26, 2012 by RedBuilt


By Jeff Jack, Manufacturing Technical Director at RedBuilt The USGBC just announced the decision to postpone the planned ballot for upcoming version of LEED for New Construction called LEED 2012.  Included with this decision are the following: -    The proposed LEED 2012 is being renamed LEED v4 and will be balloted in 2013. -    LEED 2009 will continue to be the methodology used for LEED projects for the next 3  years. -    A fifth public comment period for the proposed new methodology will be open Oct-Dec 2012. As such, FSC certified wood products will remain the only recognized method for meeting the certified wood criteria listed in LEED’s MRc7.  The USGBC announcement is available on their website and FSC’s response is available on their website. Many certification agencies are available to certify environmentally responsible forestry practices.  Green programs, such as LEED, stop at the forestry practices component of wood construction, and don’t necessarily recognize the Life Cycle Analysis (LCA) benefits that wood products provide, especially when compared to concrete and steel.  Despite this, RedBuilt™ is uniquely positioned to help you earn LEED credits including MRc 7 credit with the following FSC certified engineered wood products:  Red-I™ Joists, Red OpenWeb trusses, and RedLam™ LVL.   For information about RedBuilt’s FSC product offering, either consult with your RedBuilt Technical Representative or see our Green Building page on our website. The American Wood Council (AWC) is a great resource for facts on green building.  Their website states it best when they say ‘Wood is the perfect green building material because it is renewable, stores carbon that reduces greenhouse gases, and is energy efficient… Not only does wood store carbon keeping it out of the atmosphere, but using wood avoids greenhouse gases that would have been emitted during the manufacture or recycling of fuel –intensive materials.’


Leave a Reply

Did you notice that on page 4 we are showing table fabrication at our Stayton, OR facility? If so, you have a good eye and you probably work at Stayton! But fabrication looks about the same in Delaware.

By Cornelia Sprung on 2015 04 27.

I am interested in finding out more about RedBuild open web floor joist for residential.

For the past 15 years we have desiign our floors for L480 (even with dimensioal lumber) We pour 10’ basement walls, use TJI’s and end up boxing around mechanicals and spendind to much time and money firestopping and drafrstopping for the new IRC and IBC. Were can I get more info on RedBiuld Open web Joist

By Rolling Rock Construction Co on 2014 07 03.

Not sure why but I found your closing line hilarious. Probably because it’s corny, however it’s probably true as well! Good to know everything went well in the process. Shoppers will definitely be happy Im sure!

By Angela - Chicago Garage Builders on 2013 10 10.

Fantastic win against Scotland. Absalotely great. I curled against your Dad. was a wonderful man. I grew up on the farm where Art and Aggie now live. We have retired to Athabasca an d winter in Mesa, Az. watch all the. Curling to keep cool. best wishes at the Olympics next year. continue success .  Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 03.

Thank you for your support Mr. Ruddick. Team USA and RedBuilt are very appreciative.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Thanks Henry,

I am from Perryvale, my Dad was Ernie Lehto. Would have been great if he could have been here to watch. One tough end against both Sweden and Canada yesterday, but we will bounce back today.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Congratulations on being part of the worlds curling. Are you from the lehto family and which one from perryvale . Very best of luck. We are curling fans and watch all the games. Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 01.

A dedicated redbuilt blog reader.. Thanks for the curling coverage. Congratulations Darren and go team USA.

By bill ruddick on 2013 03 31.

Here is Heinz Mueller’s response:

You are correct, Renaldo. This application would show up more in a commercial structure vs. a residential structure. For an application such as this, I would think a moisture sealant applied to the glulam material would help alleviate the potential issues. That being said, if you decided to go that route you would probably want to start weighing the cost/benefit ratio for using additional products/services (sealant & application) vs. using similar products (LVL, I-joist blocking, etc.) for the blocking/rim board in the floor/roof system. I hope that helps. Thank you for the question and for your interest in the RedBuilt blogs! Heinz

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Here is a great reply that was posted to RedBuilt’s Linked In page:

Renaldo Montenegro, I am going to assume that using Glulams for blocking is more suited for a commercial application rather than a residential application. Thus, the Glulams carrying a very large vertical load from above. In a residential use I would see this as an over kill. Yes, I agree on the moisture content of the Glulams shrinking. Would a moisture sealant applied on the Glulams’ work in this case? A very good article! Thanks for sharing.

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Great to to hear this!!!

By Renaldo Montenegro on 2012 10 17.

Epically informative.  I learned a lot.

By Greg Riley on 2012 10 12.

[...] Posted on October 10, 2012 by [...]

By Deeper is Cheaper | RedBuilt Blog | Michael T. Dai on 2012 10 10.

[...] Call your local representative for a no cost consultation.  Read part 1 here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? (Part 2) | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 18.

[...] Read Part 2 of this article here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 17.

Great article Tom.  Not to intrude, but I would like to expand on how the Redbuilt Design Centers can help the engineer of record.  When I say help, I really mean increase the EOR’s profits while specifying a safer structural roof/floor system.  As I think back to my time as a specifying engineer, specifying Redbuilt’s Open Web trusses saved me time (I can go on about the differences between Redbuilt’s Pin Connected Open Web trusses and plated trusses but that is for another time).  When an EOR saves time, they in essence increase profits.

How does Redbuilt save an EOR time (great question)?  We do all the gravity calculations and truss connections for every loading aspect of a roof/floor system.  All the EOR has to do is specify a truss depth, truss series, show all design loads required and maybe a connection detail or two (with or without the help of a Redbuilt technical representative).  Also, if the EOR requires a PE to stamp both the shop drawing and calculations, our internal designers and engineers will provide technical oversight and assurance that products are used as intended. 

Not only can we save an EOR time but we also provide some assurance and piece of mind.

By Guy Brousseau on 2012 08 23.

Interesting to read about what you are doing, Jason.

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 29.

Sorry for the late response.  I’m glad you have enjoyed the first two.  The third was posted this past week.  It was a fun experience.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 28.

I know that learning involves failure, so thank you for being humble enough to learn.
Thank you, too, for sharing.  I’m enjoying your journey.

By Kathy Bracisco on 2012 07 24.

There is more to come.  This story will continue over the next few weeks and the whole world will know whether I was right or not.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I don’t want to give anything away because this story will continue over the next few weeks.  It was definitely an educational and enjoyable experience that I’m glad to share.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I’m guessing that you accurately predicted the failure.  I’m not an engineer, but you certainly made this understandable enough to read at my level.  Best wishes as you go for Level II!!

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 12.

Very interesting! I’m sure you will be right on.

By Norm Watts on 2012 07 12.

Thanks for the differentation of RedBuilt products.  I forwarded to two customers who wanted to know more about RedForm I joists vs. the “look alikes.”

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 25.

It is great to be a part of the legacy.  Thank you for sharing some perspective on what you are seeing both large-scale in the economy, and how the RedBuilt/legacy Trus Joist business has weathered storms in the past.

By Jeff Jack on 2012 06 23.

I like the blog and appreciate the wisdom in your words.  The focus on thriving vs. surviving is an inspiring shift of perspective.  Not easy, but RedBuilt will thrive without a doubt.  If it were easy everyone would be doing it.  RedBuilt has created a toe hold and a beginning.  Carry on.

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 20.

Hey Kurt -
I enjoyed reading this post about the old Tj and dealing with the last great recession.  I still remember those “PBL” days, wondering as a new hire if I would walk into work one day and find out that I didn’t have a job.  Fortunately that never happened, and I enjoyed the heck out of working for a great company like Trus Joist.
You guys at RedBuilt have got the old Tj culture and believe me, that will help drive your success.  All the best!
- Chris

By Chris Meyer on 2012 06 19.

Thanks Duane!  It certainly can be confusing.

By pdrace on 2012 06 16.

Great article, Paul. Nice job of laying it all out!

By Duane Bolt on 2012 06 15.

What I was impressed by was the load demand against the LVL iJoists while working in a residential market. Ya’ll make good stuff.

By Max Stanford on 2012 06 12.

back to blog

Red-I90™ and RedForm-I90™:  What is the difference?

Posted on June 20, 2012 by RedBuilt


By Jeff Jack, Manufacturing Technical Director at RedBuilt RedBuilt™ offers 3 lines of I-Joists specifically manufactured, designed and intended for use in concrete forming applications.  They are called the RedForm-I65™, RedForm-I90 and RedForm-I90H™.  Note that despite the similarity in both name and size to other I-Joist products by RedBuilt (i.e. compare RedForm-I65 to the Red-I65™ commercial I-joist), they are different products with different applications.  Here is a summary of the differences: Camber:  Oftentimes, the RedForm-I™ I-joists are produced with camber to increase span-load capability while still meeting deflection requirements for application. Web Grade:  The properties required for the web grade used in RedForm-I I-joists differs from other Red-I™ I-joists to account for end use environmental conditions. Knockout Holes:  RedForm-I I-joists are not manufactured with the knockout holes typically provided with other Red-I I-joists. Design Values:  Values associated with the design of RedForm-I I-joists take into account application adjustments such as wet use and load duration. Product Marking:  RedForm-I I-joist markings do not contain code report information; they are marked with information about series, manufacturer, production dates, third-party, and “CONCRETE FORMWORK – NOT FOR PERMANENT STRUCTURAL USE”.  This stamp is intended to prevent reuse of the RedForm-I I-joists in a permanent application in a wood-frame structure after use in formwork applications. * Not all joists that look alike are alike.  If you make a similar comparison between RedForm-I I-joists and look-alike residential series I-joists, the list of differences also grows to include:  thickness of flange, grade of flange, thickness of web, durability of web material, and durability of connection between flange and web.  Ultimately, residential series I-joists are not intended for use in forming applications. In an application like elevated slab forming where the loads are high and life safety is involved, it is essential to use the RIGHT product for the job, and RedBuilt is committed to supplying the right RedForm-I I-joist for the application. More information about RedForm-I I joists is available on our website including links to our formwork literature and installation guide. [gallery order="DESC" orderby="post_date"]


Leave a Reply

Did you notice that on page 4 we are showing table fabrication at our Stayton, OR facility? If so, you have a good eye and you probably work at Stayton! But fabrication looks about the same in Delaware.

By Cornelia Sprung on 2015 04 27.

I am interested in finding out more about RedBuild open web floor joist for residential.

For the past 15 years we have desiign our floors for L480 (even with dimensioal lumber) We pour 10’ basement walls, use TJI’s and end up boxing around mechanicals and spendind to much time and money firestopping and drafrstopping for the new IRC and IBC. Were can I get more info on RedBiuld Open web Joist

By Rolling Rock Construction Co on 2014 07 03.

Not sure why but I found your closing line hilarious. Probably because it’s corny, however it’s probably true as well! Good to know everything went well in the process. Shoppers will definitely be happy Im sure!

By Angela - Chicago Garage Builders on 2013 10 10.

Fantastic win against Scotland. Absalotely great. I curled against your Dad. was a wonderful man. I grew up on the farm where Art and Aggie now live. We have retired to Athabasca an d winter in Mesa, Az. watch all the. Curling to keep cool. best wishes at the Olympics next year. continue success .  Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 03.

Thank you for your support Mr. Ruddick. Team USA and RedBuilt are very appreciative.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Thanks Henry,

I am from Perryvale, my Dad was Ernie Lehto. Would have been great if he could have been here to watch. One tough end against both Sweden and Canada yesterday, but we will bounce back today.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Congratulations on being part of the worlds curling. Are you from the lehto family and which one from perryvale . Very best of luck. We are curling fans and watch all the games. Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 01.

A dedicated redbuilt blog reader.. Thanks for the curling coverage. Congratulations Darren and go team USA.

By bill ruddick on 2013 03 31.

Here is Heinz Mueller’s response:

You are correct, Renaldo. This application would show up more in a commercial structure vs. a residential structure. For an application such as this, I would think a moisture sealant applied to the glulam material would help alleviate the potential issues. That being said, if you decided to go that route you would probably want to start weighing the cost/benefit ratio for using additional products/services (sealant & application) vs. using similar products (LVL, I-joist blocking, etc.) for the blocking/rim board in the floor/roof system. I hope that helps. Thank you for the question and for your interest in the RedBuilt blogs! Heinz

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Here is a great reply that was posted to RedBuilt’s Linked In page:

Renaldo Montenegro, I am going to assume that using Glulams for blocking is more suited for a commercial application rather than a residential application. Thus, the Glulams carrying a very large vertical load from above. In a residential use I would see this as an over kill. Yes, I agree on the moisture content of the Glulams shrinking. Would a moisture sealant applied on the Glulams’ work in this case? A very good article! Thanks for sharing.

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Great to to hear this!!!

By Renaldo Montenegro on 2012 10 17.

Epically informative.  I learned a lot.

By Greg Riley on 2012 10 12.

[...] Posted on October 10, 2012 by [...]

By Deeper is Cheaper | RedBuilt Blog | Michael T. Dai on 2012 10 10.

[...] Call your local representative for a no cost consultation.  Read part 1 here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? (Part 2) | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 18.

[...] Read Part 2 of this article here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 17.

Great article Tom.  Not to intrude, but I would like to expand on how the Redbuilt Design Centers can help the engineer of record.  When I say help, I really mean increase the EOR’s profits while specifying a safer structural roof/floor system.  As I think back to my time as a specifying engineer, specifying Redbuilt’s Open Web trusses saved me time (I can go on about the differences between Redbuilt’s Pin Connected Open Web trusses and plated trusses but that is for another time).  When an EOR saves time, they in essence increase profits.

How does Redbuilt save an EOR time (great question)?  We do all the gravity calculations and truss connections for every loading aspect of a roof/floor system.  All the EOR has to do is specify a truss depth, truss series, show all design loads required and maybe a connection detail or two (with or without the help of a Redbuilt technical representative).  Also, if the EOR requires a PE to stamp both the shop drawing and calculations, our internal designers and engineers will provide technical oversight and assurance that products are used as intended. 

Not only can we save an EOR time but we also provide some assurance and piece of mind.

By Guy Brousseau on 2012 08 23.

Interesting to read about what you are doing, Jason.

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 29.

Sorry for the late response.  I’m glad you have enjoyed the first two.  The third was posted this past week.  It was a fun experience.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 28.

I know that learning involves failure, so thank you for being humble enough to learn.
Thank you, too, for sharing.  I’m enjoying your journey.

By Kathy Bracisco on 2012 07 24.

There is more to come.  This story will continue over the next few weeks and the whole world will know whether I was right or not.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I don’t want to give anything away because this story will continue over the next few weeks.  It was definitely an educational and enjoyable experience that I’m glad to share.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I’m guessing that you accurately predicted the failure.  I’m not an engineer, but you certainly made this understandable enough to read at my level.  Best wishes as you go for Level II!!

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 12.

Very interesting! I’m sure you will be right on.

By Norm Watts on 2012 07 12.

Thanks for the differentation of RedBuilt products.  I forwarded to two customers who wanted to know more about RedForm I joists vs. the “look alikes.”

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 25.

It is great to be a part of the legacy.  Thank you for sharing some perspective on what you are seeing both large-scale in the economy, and how the RedBuilt/legacy Trus Joist business has weathered storms in the past.

By Jeff Jack on 2012 06 23.

I like the blog and appreciate the wisdom in your words.  The focus on thriving vs. surviving is an inspiring shift of perspective.  Not easy, but RedBuilt will thrive without a doubt.  If it were easy everyone would be doing it.  RedBuilt has created a toe hold and a beginning.  Carry on.

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 20.

Hey Kurt -
I enjoyed reading this post about the old Tj and dealing with the last great recession.  I still remember those “PBL” days, wondering as a new hire if I would walk into work one day and find out that I didn’t have a job.  Fortunately that never happened, and I enjoyed the heck out of working for a great company like Trus Joist.
You guys at RedBuilt have got the old Tj culture and believe me, that will help drive your success.  All the best!
- Chris

By Chris Meyer on 2012 06 19.

Thanks Duane!  It certainly can be confusing.

By pdrace on 2012 06 16.

Great article, Paul. Nice job of laying it all out!

By Duane Bolt on 2012 06 15.

What I was impressed by was the load demand against the LVL iJoists while working in a residential market. Ya’ll make good stuff.

By Max Stanford on 2012 06 12.

back to blog

RedBuilt and the Economy… my visit with Walt Minnick

Posted on June 14, 2012 by RedBuilt


by Kurt Liebich, CEO at RedBuilt Former US Congressman, Walt Minnick, stopped into my office last week.  I enjoyed speaking with him, and reminiscing about TJ/RedBuilt’s history.  Prior to entering politics, Walt was CEO of Trus Joist in the 1980’s and early 1990’s.  Walt led the company through the brutal building recession in the early 1980’s, and he led Trus Joist’s expansion into the Residential building market.  During Walt’s tenure as CEO, the Company grew exponentially, and Walt always provided outstanding leadership during both the good times and the bad.  Walt and Jody Olson hired me back in 1994, and they were my first mentors in the business.  I owe a tremendous debt of gratitude to Walt, and all the opportunities and guidance that he provided me during the course of my career. Walt was always very direct, and so it did not take him long to ask me his standard question, “How’s business?”  To which I replied, “It’s better… not good…. but better.”  I went on to explain that RedBuilt, like almost every construction related company, has been to hell and back over the past five years.   As we all know, housing peaked in 2006 at over 2 million starts, and then with the collapse of Lehman and the rest of the financial markets, housing starts bottomed out at 500 thousand in 2009.  Since this point in time, housing and all construction related activity has been bouncing on bottom.  This downturn has been unprecedented in its severity and duration.  As a result, many great Companies have been destroyed.  RedBuilt has been fighting to survive for the last six years, and while we are seeing some positive signs of activity, there are still many storm clouds on the horizon. In my lifetime, the only downturn that came even close to the one that we are currently living through is the recession in the early 1980’s.  Walt was running Trus Joist during this period of time, and he shared with me his unique leadership perspective.  In those days, housing peaked at around 2 million starts in the late 1970’s, and then plummeted to 850 thousand units in 1981.  This downturn was brutal, and it was largely driven by the dramatic rise in mortgage rates, which was related to a spike in inflation.  Mortgage rates increased from 9% in 1978 to 18% in 1981.  At these high financing costs, nobody could afford to build or buy anything.  Walt explained how tough it was to manage the business through this rapid decline.  For any business that experiences this rapid of a decline in demand, it is almost impossible to take fixed costs out of your business quickly enough to survive.  The ones that survived, cut quickly and cut aggressively.  These tough decisions are the only levers that leaders have to balance the cost structure of the business with the overall level of business activity. The difference between the recession of the 1980’s and the one we are dealing with today is that the downturn in the early 1980’s was driven by inflation and the resulting increase in mortgage rates.  Once the policy makers got inflation under control, interest rates declined, and building activity resumed.  As a result, in the 1980’s, the downturn was short lived,  By 1982, housing starts rebounded to 1.3 million, and for the balance of the decade, they hovered in the 1.5 million range. Conversely, the downturn that we are currently dealing with was directly related to the complete and utter collapse of the financial system in late 2008.  These events coming in the wake of the housing bubble were utterly devastating, and resulted in the destruction of vast amounts of home equity.  The resulting foreclosure mess has created a shadow inventory that will take years to unwind.  Worse yet, the policy makers in Washington really do not have any levers that they can pull to address this situation.  Unlike the early 1980’s, interest rates are already at historical lows, and the large fiscal deficit positions and the resulting political gridlock make it nearly impossible to pass bills that could stimulate the economy. Having painted this bleak picture, both Walt and I believe that the worst is behind us.  Despite the lack of leadership in Washington, it appears that developers and consumers are beginning to gain a small amount of confidence.  Housing starts are improving modestly, and at RedBuilt, we are seeing a marginal increase in the level of commercial building activity.  The residential and commercial construction industry is regaining stability.  Slowly but surely, we are working through the fundamental structural issues that have plagued our industry for the last six years.   I remain optimistic about the long-term fundamentals for the US economy despite the macro uncertainty that will continue to emerge from Europe. As Walt left my office, he turned and said, “RedBuilt is a survivor!!” While none of us are in business to “survive”, I couldn’t help but agree with him, and to be proud of the hard work and sacrifices that the RedBuilt associates have made to help us survive these unprecedented economic times.  Survival is a defensive position.  Success comes from thriving, and with better days most certainly ahead, we are shifting our focus to “Surthrival” – essentially, we need to continue to be diligent, but also, need to shift our thinking to thriving in the new norm.  Simply stated, we can’t wait for better days, but instead, we need to make the current days better.


Leave a Reply

Did you notice that on page 4 we are showing table fabrication at our Stayton, OR facility? If so, you have a good eye and you probably work at Stayton! But fabrication looks about the same in Delaware.

By Cornelia Sprung on 2015 04 27.

I am interested in finding out more about RedBuild open web floor joist for residential.

For the past 15 years we have desiign our floors for L480 (even with dimensioal lumber) We pour 10’ basement walls, use TJI’s and end up boxing around mechanicals and spendind to much time and money firestopping and drafrstopping for the new IRC and IBC. Were can I get more info on RedBiuld Open web Joist

By Rolling Rock Construction Co on 2014 07 03.

Not sure why but I found your closing line hilarious. Probably because it’s corny, however it’s probably true as well! Good to know everything went well in the process. Shoppers will definitely be happy Im sure!

By Angela - Chicago Garage Builders on 2013 10 10.

Fantastic win against Scotland. Absalotely great. I curled against your Dad. was a wonderful man. I grew up on the farm where Art and Aggie now live. We have retired to Athabasca an d winter in Mesa, Az. watch all the. Curling to keep cool. best wishes at the Olympics next year. continue success .  Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 03.

Thank you for your support Mr. Ruddick. Team USA and RedBuilt are very appreciative.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Thanks Henry,

I am from Perryvale, my Dad was Ernie Lehto. Would have been great if he could have been here to watch. One tough end against both Sweden and Canada yesterday, but we will bounce back today.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Congratulations on being part of the worlds curling. Are you from the lehto family and which one from perryvale . Very best of luck. We are curling fans and watch all the games. Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 01.

A dedicated redbuilt blog reader.. Thanks for the curling coverage. Congratulations Darren and go team USA.

By bill ruddick on 2013 03 31.

Here is Heinz Mueller’s response:

You are correct, Renaldo. This application would show up more in a commercial structure vs. a residential structure. For an application such as this, I would think a moisture sealant applied to the glulam material would help alleviate the potential issues. That being said, if you decided to go that route you would probably want to start weighing the cost/benefit ratio for using additional products/services (sealant & application) vs. using similar products (LVL, I-joist blocking, etc.) for the blocking/rim board in the floor/roof system. I hope that helps. Thank you for the question and for your interest in the RedBuilt blogs! Heinz

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Here is a great reply that was posted to RedBuilt’s Linked In page:

Renaldo Montenegro, I am going to assume that using Glulams for blocking is more suited for a commercial application rather than a residential application. Thus, the Glulams carrying a very large vertical load from above. In a residential use I would see this as an over kill. Yes, I agree on the moisture content of the Glulams shrinking. Would a moisture sealant applied on the Glulams’ work in this case? A very good article! Thanks for sharing.

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Great to to hear this!!!

By Renaldo Montenegro on 2012 10 17.

Epically informative.  I learned a lot.

By Greg Riley on 2012 10 12.

[...] Posted on October 10, 2012 by [...]

By Deeper is Cheaper | RedBuilt Blog | Michael T. Dai on 2012 10 10.

[...] Call your local representative for a no cost consultation.  Read part 1 here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? (Part 2) | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 18.

[...] Read Part 2 of this article here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 17.

Great article Tom.  Not to intrude, but I would like to expand on how the Redbuilt Design Centers can help the engineer of record.  When I say help, I really mean increase the EOR’s profits while specifying a safer structural roof/floor system.  As I think back to my time as a specifying engineer, specifying Redbuilt’s Open Web trusses saved me time (I can go on about the differences between Redbuilt’s Pin Connected Open Web trusses and plated trusses but that is for another time).  When an EOR saves time, they in essence increase profits.

How does Redbuilt save an EOR time (great question)?  We do all the gravity calculations and truss connections for every loading aspect of a roof/floor system.  All the EOR has to do is specify a truss depth, truss series, show all design loads required and maybe a connection detail or two (with or without the help of a Redbuilt technical representative).  Also, if the EOR requires a PE to stamp both the shop drawing and calculations, our internal designers and engineers will provide technical oversight and assurance that products are used as intended. 

Not only can we save an EOR time but we also provide some assurance and piece of mind.

By Guy Brousseau on 2012 08 23.

Interesting to read about what you are doing, Jason.

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 29.

Sorry for the late response.  I’m glad you have enjoyed the first two.  The third was posted this past week.  It was a fun experience.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 28.

I know that learning involves failure, so thank you for being humble enough to learn.
Thank you, too, for sharing.  I’m enjoying your journey.

By Kathy Bracisco on 2012 07 24.

There is more to come.  This story will continue over the next few weeks and the whole world will know whether I was right or not.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I don’t want to give anything away because this story will continue over the next few weeks.  It was definitely an educational and enjoyable experience that I’m glad to share.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I’m guessing that you accurately predicted the failure.  I’m not an engineer, but you certainly made this understandable enough to read at my level.  Best wishes as you go for Level II!!

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 12.

Very interesting! I’m sure you will be right on.

By Norm Watts on 2012 07 12.

Thanks for the differentation of RedBuilt products.  I forwarded to two customers who wanted to know more about RedForm I joists vs. the “look alikes.”

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 25.

It is great to be a part of the legacy.  Thank you for sharing some perspective on what you are seeing both large-scale in the economy, and how the RedBuilt/legacy Trus Joist business has weathered storms in the past.

By Jeff Jack on 2012 06 23.

I like the blog and appreciate the wisdom in your words.  The focus on thriving vs. surviving is an inspiring shift of perspective.  Not easy, but RedBuilt will thrive without a doubt.  If it were easy everyone would be doing it.  RedBuilt has created a toe hold and a beginning.  Carry on.

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 20.

Hey Kurt -
I enjoyed reading this post about the old Tj and dealing with the last great recession.  I still remember those “PBL” days, wondering as a new hire if I would walk into work one day and find out that I didn’t have a job.  Fortunately that never happened, and I enjoyed the heck out of working for a great company like Trus Joist.
You guys at RedBuilt have got the old Tj culture and believe me, that will help drive your success.  All the best!
- Chris

By Chris Meyer on 2012 06 19.

Thanks Duane!  It certainly can be confusing.

By pdrace on 2012 06 16.

Great article, Paul. Nice job of laying it all out!

By Duane Bolt on 2012 06 15.

What I was impressed by was the load demand against the LVL iJoists while working in a residential market. Ya’ll make good stuff.

By Max Stanford on 2012 06 12.

back to blog

Loads….why we need them and how that information helps you.

Posted on June 05, 2012 by RedBuilt


By Rex Flegel, Design Manager at RedBuilt Every year the summer months bring RedBuilt into the season of increased demand.  One potential bottle neck in our business as this demand increases is design and support services.  These are the people that create product layouts and calculations and ensure that RedBuilt products efficiently and safely fit the building. Packages developed by Architects and Engineers are the cornerstone of the work we perform in house.  As dictated by the International Building Code (IBC), we are required to design our products only for loads that are specified in the contract documents.  Unfortunately, when information is missing or unavailable in the packages, it can slow down the process of getting submittals out the door for review. Three items that come up frequently are missing Application Dead Loads, Snow Drift, and Net Wind Uplift.  The structural, topographic, and materials data required to accurately generate these loads are complex and require first hand knowledge of the structure and its local environment. These items are almost always calculated by the Responsible Design Professionals, but rarely make it into the nuts and bolts construction drawings that the material suppliers are provided. This poses a unique challenge to our design and engineering team.  Our solution to missing loads is either to track them down, or make assumptions based on what information we do have and cloud for verification. Our first choice in the design department is to try to obtain the information by sending a Request for Information (RFI) through the buyer.  Many times this is successful and we are able to move along with our production package.  However, Architects and Engineers are busy folks, and procuring information can be difficult on some jobs.  Either way, the process adds time to everyone involved – Specifier, Contractor, and RedBuilt. Our second choice of assuming a load is risky, especially if there are custom Open Web truss designs to be generated.  When a framer turns in a project with answered clouds from their EOR, their assumption is that we are ready to release a job immediately.  In many cases we are receiving enough information to start the design phase, not finish it.  The time it takes to re-work a job with new loads can bring a job site to an unexpected and costly halt. So….having all the loads specified on the contract drawings can get your submittals started faster, processed quicker,  and released to the plant expeditiously.  All of which add up to a project that is designed correctly and delivered on time.


Leave a Reply

Did you notice that on page 4 we are showing table fabrication at our Stayton, OR facility? If so, you have a good eye and you probably work at Stayton! But fabrication looks about the same in Delaware.

By Cornelia Sprung on 2015 04 27.

I am interested in finding out more about RedBuild open web floor joist for residential.

For the past 15 years we have desiign our floors for L480 (even with dimensioal lumber) We pour 10’ basement walls, use TJI’s and end up boxing around mechanicals and spendind to much time and money firestopping and drafrstopping for the new IRC and IBC. Were can I get more info on RedBiuld Open web Joist

By Rolling Rock Construction Co on 2014 07 03.

Not sure why but I found your closing line hilarious. Probably because it’s corny, however it’s probably true as well! Good to know everything went well in the process. Shoppers will definitely be happy Im sure!

By Angela - Chicago Garage Builders on 2013 10 10.

Fantastic win against Scotland. Absalotely great. I curled against your Dad. was a wonderful man. I grew up on the farm where Art and Aggie now live. We have retired to Athabasca an d winter in Mesa, Az. watch all the. Curling to keep cool. best wishes at the Olympics next year. continue success .  Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 03.

Thank you for your support Mr. Ruddick. Team USA and RedBuilt are very appreciative.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Thanks Henry,

I am from Perryvale, my Dad was Ernie Lehto. Would have been great if he could have been here to watch. One tough end against both Sweden and Canada yesterday, but we will bounce back today.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Congratulations on being part of the worlds curling. Are you from the lehto family and which one from perryvale . Very best of luck. We are curling fans and watch all the games. Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 01.

A dedicated redbuilt blog reader.. Thanks for the curling coverage. Congratulations Darren and go team USA.

By bill ruddick on 2013 03 31.

Here is Heinz Mueller’s response:

You are correct, Renaldo. This application would show up more in a commercial structure vs. a residential structure. For an application such as this, I would think a moisture sealant applied to the glulam material would help alleviate the potential issues. That being said, if you decided to go that route you would probably want to start weighing the cost/benefit ratio for using additional products/services (sealant & application) vs. using similar products (LVL, I-joist blocking, etc.) for the blocking/rim board in the floor/roof system. I hope that helps. Thank you for the question and for your interest in the RedBuilt blogs! Heinz

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Here is a great reply that was posted to RedBuilt’s Linked In page:

Renaldo Montenegro, I am going to assume that using Glulams for blocking is more suited for a commercial application rather than a residential application. Thus, the Glulams carrying a very large vertical load from above. In a residential use I would see this as an over kill. Yes, I agree on the moisture content of the Glulams shrinking. Would a moisture sealant applied on the Glulams’ work in this case? A very good article! Thanks for sharing.

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Great to to hear this!!!

By Renaldo Montenegro on 2012 10 17.

Epically informative.  I learned a lot.

By Greg Riley on 2012 10 12.

[...] Posted on October 10, 2012 by [...]

By Deeper is Cheaper | RedBuilt Blog | Michael T. Dai on 2012 10 10.

[...] Call your local representative for a no cost consultation.  Read part 1 here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? (Part 2) | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 18.

[...] Read Part 2 of this article here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 17.

Great article Tom.  Not to intrude, but I would like to expand on how the Redbuilt Design Centers can help the engineer of record.  When I say help, I really mean increase the EOR’s profits while specifying a safer structural roof/floor system.  As I think back to my time as a specifying engineer, specifying Redbuilt’s Open Web trusses saved me time (I can go on about the differences between Redbuilt’s Pin Connected Open Web trusses and plated trusses but that is for another time).  When an EOR saves time, they in essence increase profits.

How does Redbuilt save an EOR time (great question)?  We do all the gravity calculations and truss connections for every loading aspect of a roof/floor system.  All the EOR has to do is specify a truss depth, truss series, show all design loads required and maybe a connection detail or two (with or without the help of a Redbuilt technical representative).  Also, if the EOR requires a PE to stamp both the shop drawing and calculations, our internal designers and engineers will provide technical oversight and assurance that products are used as intended. 

Not only can we save an EOR time but we also provide some assurance and piece of mind.

By Guy Brousseau on 2012 08 23.

Interesting to read about what you are doing, Jason.

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 29.

Sorry for the late response.  I’m glad you have enjoyed the first two.  The third was posted this past week.  It was a fun experience.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 28.

I know that learning involves failure, so thank you for being humble enough to learn.
Thank you, too, for sharing.  I’m enjoying your journey.

By Kathy Bracisco on 2012 07 24.

There is more to come.  This story will continue over the next few weeks and the whole world will know whether I was right or not.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I don’t want to give anything away because this story will continue over the next few weeks.  It was definitely an educational and enjoyable experience that I’m glad to share.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I’m guessing that you accurately predicted the failure.  I’m not an engineer, but you certainly made this understandable enough to read at my level.  Best wishes as you go for Level II!!

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 12.

Very interesting! I’m sure you will be right on.

By Norm Watts on 2012 07 12.

Thanks for the differentation of RedBuilt products.  I forwarded to two customers who wanted to know more about RedForm I joists vs. the “look alikes.”

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 25.

It is great to be a part of the legacy.  Thank you for sharing some perspective on what you are seeing both large-scale in the economy, and how the RedBuilt/legacy Trus Joist business has weathered storms in the past.

By Jeff Jack on 2012 06 23.

I like the blog and appreciate the wisdom in your words.  The focus on thriving vs. surviving is an inspiring shift of perspective.  Not easy, but RedBuilt will thrive without a doubt.  If it were easy everyone would be doing it.  RedBuilt has created a toe hold and a beginning.  Carry on.

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 20.

Hey Kurt -
I enjoyed reading this post about the old Tj and dealing with the last great recession.  I still remember those “PBL” days, wondering as a new hire if I would walk into work one day and find out that I didn’t have a job.  Fortunately that never happened, and I enjoyed the heck out of working for a great company like Trus Joist.
You guys at RedBuilt have got the old Tj culture and believe me, that will help drive your success.  All the best!
- Chris

By Chris Meyer on 2012 06 19.

Thanks Duane!  It certainly can be confusing.

By pdrace on 2012 06 16.

Great article, Paul. Nice job of laying it all out!

By Duane Bolt on 2012 06 15.

What I was impressed by was the load demand against the LVL iJoists while working in a residential market. Ya’ll make good stuff.

By Max Stanford on 2012 06 12.

back to blog

“Hey, what should I be specifying now?”

Posted on May 29, 2012 by RedBuilt


by Paul Drace, P.E. - Director of Marketing at RedBuilt Glad you asked… Given significant changes recently among manufacturers of EWP, it’s no surprise that lately I’ve been fielding many questions related to engineered wood structural systems for commercial projects. Changes in the industry—manufacturers exiting, others re-branding, and yet others, like RedBuilt™, “entering” the market—have caused some confusion for designers and contractors alike. Questions like “What is equivalent to what was specified?” or “What should I specify now?” come to mind.  The uncertainty can be unnerving.  So, to help mitigate some of the confusion with respect to RedBuilt™ and our products, the following information should prove useful … A brief history lesson… Saying RedBuilt™ has “recently entered the market” is a bit of an understatement.  The reality is we are a 50-year-old start-up. Yes, we have a new name, but we, and our name, are rooted in 50-years of innovative EWP history. In 1960, Harold Thomas, also known as “Red” (our namesake), crossed paths with an architect and self-taught inventor named Art Troutner.  Together they came up with a revolutionary wood and steel composite open-web truss for roof and floor systems.  These trusses offered dramatic improvements and advantages in weight, strength, cost, and ease of installation over dimensional lumber and steel alternatives. Red and Art pioneered the new category of engineered wood products in commercial construction. Their company—called Trus Joist®—thrived in the design and manufacturing of engineered roof and floor systems for commercial construction. They continued their innovations with the invention of the wood I-Joist and Laminated Veneer Lumber (LVL), and the business expanded rapidly beyond its roots into other areas including residential construction. In 2000, the company was acquired by the Weyerhaeuser Company. The parent company’s core business model was commodity standardization and high throughput.  They accomplished this by selling structural framing materials to residential contractors through retail lumberyard dealers and distributors. Ideal for residential, but not so ideal for the commercial construction industry. It was also during this period that Weyerhaueser bundled the original Trus Joist® product line under a new brand they called, iLevel®. As time passed, the commercial division experienced little growth. Why? Success in the commercial business required a high degree of consultative, personal service and engineering skills, coupled with customized manufacturing and the flexibility to source directly to jobsites. This created conflict with the parent company…and an opportunity. Going back to the future… In 2009, a group of former Trus Joist® executives, along with our co-founder, recognized the 50-year successful legacy and potential of the original Trus Joist® commercial division, and they acquired it from Weyerhaeuser to operate as a stand-alone business.  And, with its sole mission to serve the needs of commercial construction customers, a new, independent company was established and named RedBuilt™, after founder Harold “Red” Thomas. RedBuilt re-launched the former commercial division product line, received all code-approvals and certifications, and today our products are known as the “Red” series—Red-I™ I-Joists, Red Open Web Trusses, RedLam™ Laminated Veneer Lumber, RedPlank™ Scaffold Plank, and RedForm™ Concrete Forming. Back to its roots, RedBuilt today is the premier supplier of structural solutions to the commercial and industrial construction industry, providing engineered wood roofing and flooring systems for commercial applications including retail, office, school, warehouse and high-end residential projects. Central to RedBuilt’s past and future success is our involvement in every aspect of the project from inception through installation:

  • Work directly with specifiers to help create optimal solutions.
  • Provide a customized, job-specific framing solution that is shipped directly from the manufacturing facility to the job site.
  • Support jobsites directly during installation.
What’s happening today? Weyerhaeuser recently discontinued its iLevel® brand and now markets its products under the old Trus Joist® brand name. Understandably, this has created some confusion for specifiers in commercial and industrial applications. When you specify RedBuilt—you ensure all the advantages that come from the leading supplier of engineered wood structural systems for commercial structures: Experience and technical know-how…
  • On average, RedBuilt completes 2,000 projects annually—that’s more than 20,000 in the last decade alone!
  • 14 year average tenure for both our Manufacturing and Engineering teams.
  • Technical Sales team average tenure of 17 years.
  • Maintain archives of projects dating back as far as the 1960’s.
  • Our technical representatives know you and your project specifically and can help ensure your project requirements are met.
  • Jobsite support – Both pre- and post-installation to position the project for seamless installation.
  • Lifetime warranty – We’re so confident in our products and services, that we offer a lifetime warranty.
These translate into peace-of-mind and a problem-free process for you, our customers. Our experience means our customers get the needed structural solutions, support and products the first time, every time…Fewer rework loops, greater efficiency, and an improved bottom line for you. RedBuilt is much more than just the engineered wood products we produce. It is our history, our experience, and our commitment to our customers’ satisfaction that make the difference. RedBuilt product conversion charts These conversion charts will help you to identify the appropriate RedBuilt I-Joists and Open-Web truss products that meet your specific needs: I-Joist Conversion Table

RedBuilt™

Equivalent Designation

Available Depths

LVL Flange

Web

Red-I45™

--

9-1/2", 11-7/8", 14"-20"

1-1/2" x 1-3/4"

3/8"

Red-I65™

TJI® L65

11-7/8", 14"-30"

1-1/2" x 2-1/2"

7/16"

Red-65T™

Tapered TJI® L65

9-1/2"-30"

1-1/2" x 2-1/2"

7/16"

Red-I90™

TJI® L90

11-7/8", 14"-30"

1-1/2" x 3-1/2"

7/16"

Red-90H™

TJI® H90

11-7/8", 14"-30"

1-3/4" x 3-1/2"

7/16"

Red-90HS™

TJI® HS90

11-7/8", 14"-32"

2-1/2" x 3-1/2"

1/2"

 
Open-Web Truss Conversion Table

RedBuilt™

Discontinued Designation

Red-L™

TJL™

Red-W™

TJW™

Red-S™

TJS™

Red-M™

TJM™

Red-H™

TJH™


Leave a Reply

Did you notice that on page 4 we are showing table fabrication at our Stayton, OR facility? If so, you have a good eye and you probably work at Stayton! But fabrication looks about the same in Delaware.

By Cornelia Sprung on 2015 04 27.

I am interested in finding out more about RedBuild open web floor joist for residential.

For the past 15 years we have desiign our floors for L480 (even with dimensioal lumber) We pour 10’ basement walls, use TJI’s and end up boxing around mechanicals and spendind to much time and money firestopping and drafrstopping for the new IRC and IBC. Were can I get more info on RedBiuld Open web Joist

By Rolling Rock Construction Co on 2014 07 03.

Not sure why but I found your closing line hilarious. Probably because it’s corny, however it’s probably true as well! Good to know everything went well in the process. Shoppers will definitely be happy Im sure!

By Angela - Chicago Garage Builders on 2013 10 10.

Fantastic win against Scotland. Absalotely great. I curled against your Dad. was a wonderful man. I grew up on the farm where Art and Aggie now live. We have retired to Athabasca an d winter in Mesa, Az. watch all the. Curling to keep cool. best wishes at the Olympics next year. continue success .  Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 03.

Thank you for your support Mr. Ruddick. Team USA and RedBuilt are very appreciative.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Thanks Henry,

I am from Perryvale, my Dad was Ernie Lehto. Would have been great if he could have been here to watch. One tough end against both Sweden and Canada yesterday, but we will bounce back today.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Congratulations on being part of the worlds curling. Are you from the lehto family and which one from perryvale . Very best of luck. We are curling fans and watch all the games. Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 01.

A dedicated redbuilt blog reader.. Thanks for the curling coverage. Congratulations Darren and go team USA.

By bill ruddick on 2013 03 31.

Here is Heinz Mueller’s response:

You are correct, Renaldo. This application would show up more in a commercial structure vs. a residential structure. For an application such as this, I would think a moisture sealant applied to the glulam material would help alleviate the potential issues. That being said, if you decided to go that route you would probably want to start weighing the cost/benefit ratio for using additional products/services (sealant & application) vs. using similar products (LVL, I-joist blocking, etc.) for the blocking/rim board in the floor/roof system. I hope that helps. Thank you for the question and for your interest in the RedBuilt blogs! Heinz

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Here is a great reply that was posted to RedBuilt’s Linked In page:

Renaldo Montenegro, I am going to assume that using Glulams for blocking is more suited for a commercial application rather than a residential application. Thus, the Glulams carrying a very large vertical load from above. In a residential use I would see this as an over kill. Yes, I agree on the moisture content of the Glulams shrinking. Would a moisture sealant applied on the Glulams’ work in this case? A very good article! Thanks for sharing.

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Great to to hear this!!!

By Renaldo Montenegro on 2012 10 17.

Epically informative.  I learned a lot.

By Greg Riley on 2012 10 12.

[...] Posted on October 10, 2012 by [...]

By Deeper is Cheaper | RedBuilt Blog | Michael T. Dai on 2012 10 10.

[...] Call your local representative for a no cost consultation.  Read part 1 here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? (Part 2) | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 18.

[...] Read Part 2 of this article here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 17.

Great article Tom.  Not to intrude, but I would like to expand on how the Redbuilt Design Centers can help the engineer of record.  When I say help, I really mean increase the EOR’s profits while specifying a safer structural roof/floor system.  As I think back to my time as a specifying engineer, specifying Redbuilt’s Open Web trusses saved me time (I can go on about the differences between Redbuilt’s Pin Connected Open Web trusses and plated trusses but that is for another time).  When an EOR saves time, they in essence increase profits.

How does Redbuilt save an EOR time (great question)?  We do all the gravity calculations and truss connections for every loading aspect of a roof/floor system.  All the EOR has to do is specify a truss depth, truss series, show all design loads required and maybe a connection detail or two (with or without the help of a Redbuilt technical representative).  Also, if the EOR requires a PE to stamp both the shop drawing and calculations, our internal designers and engineers will provide technical oversight and assurance that products are used as intended. 

Not only can we save an EOR time but we also provide some assurance and piece of mind.

By Guy Brousseau on 2012 08 23.

Interesting to read about what you are doing, Jason.

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 29.

Sorry for the late response.  I’m glad you have enjoyed the first two.  The third was posted this past week.  It was a fun experience.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 28.

I know that learning involves failure, so thank you for being humble enough to learn.
Thank you, too, for sharing.  I’m enjoying your journey.

By Kathy Bracisco on 2012 07 24.

There is more to come.  This story will continue over the next few weeks and the whole world will know whether I was right or not.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I don’t want to give anything away because this story will continue over the next few weeks.  It was definitely an educational and enjoyable experience that I’m glad to share.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I’m guessing that you accurately predicted the failure.  I’m not an engineer, but you certainly made this understandable enough to read at my level.  Best wishes as you go for Level II!!

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 12.

Very interesting! I’m sure you will be right on.

By Norm Watts on 2012 07 12.

Thanks for the differentation of RedBuilt products.  I forwarded to two customers who wanted to know more about RedForm I joists vs. the “look alikes.”

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 25.

It is great to be a part of the legacy.  Thank you for sharing some perspective on what you are seeing both large-scale in the economy, and how the RedBuilt/legacy Trus Joist business has weathered storms in the past.

By Jeff Jack on 2012 06 23.

I like the blog and appreciate the wisdom in your words.  The focus on thriving vs. surviving is an inspiring shift of perspective.  Not easy, but RedBuilt will thrive without a doubt.  If it were easy everyone would be doing it.  RedBuilt has created a toe hold and a beginning.  Carry on.

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 20.

Hey Kurt -
I enjoyed reading this post about the old Tj and dealing with the last great recession.  I still remember those “PBL” days, wondering as a new hire if I would walk into work one day and find out that I didn’t have a job.  Fortunately that never happened, and I enjoyed the heck out of working for a great company like Trus Joist.
You guys at RedBuilt have got the old Tj culture and believe me, that will help drive your success.  All the best!
- Chris

By Chris Meyer on 2012 06 19.

Thanks Duane!  It certainly can be confusing.

By pdrace on 2012 06 16.

Great article, Paul. Nice job of laying it all out!

By Duane Bolt on 2012 06 15.

What I was impressed by was the load demand against the LVL iJoists while working in a residential market. Ya’ll make good stuff.

By Max Stanford on 2012 06 12.

back to blog

RedBuilt™ Product Repair Roles & Responsibilities

Posted on May 22, 2012 by RedBuilt


by Heather Strong, P.E. Senior Engineer at RedBuilt RedBuilt™ is committed to providing quality products and services to our customers.  It is because of this commitment that we provide each of our customers with a product warranty. "We warrant that our products will be free from manufacturing errors or defects in workmanship and material.  In addition, we warrant the adequacy of our design for the normal and expected life of the building, provided the product is correctly installed and used." Through the course of a building's life there are instances in which RedBuilt™ products are being repaired, salvaged for reuse or modified.  RedBuilt™ considers the responsibility in determining the suitability of the products for reuse the province of practicing consulting engineers. When RedBuilt™ is contacted regarding the repair or reuse of our products, our first step is to recommend that the services of a professional engineer are secured.  The service we provide is to assist the engineer by providing requested information and detailing suggestions.  RedBuilt retains historic code reports and truss designs dating back into the 1960's, and for a fee and when available, will provide this information to design professionals.  RedBuilt™ associates are product knowledge experts and can evaluate repairs for suitability with our products and/or suggest repair details based on our experience and expertise.  In addition, our manufacturing facilities can furnish currently available parts or components as sized and selected by a practicing engineer and verified by a RedBuilt™ engineer. The RedBuilt™ Terms and Conditions state that "…if products are in any way altered except as explicitly provided in RedBuilt™ LLC's published instructions or by written permission of RedBuilt™ LLC, then all warranties are void." Repairs to RedBuilt™ products will continue to carry our product warranty only if a Design Professional of Record and RedBuilt™ have collaborated on the solution and RedBuilt™ has a record of the repair.  Any system modified without RedBuilt™ involvement, with or without a Design Professional nullifies the RedBuilt™ warranty.  So, when in doubt, the best solution is to contact your RedBuilt™ Technical Representative for assistance/guidance when repair/reuse situations arise. For more information, visit the following RedBuilt website pages: Product Repair & Improvement Product Warranty Terms & Conditions


Leave a Reply

Did you notice that on page 4 we are showing table fabrication at our Stayton, OR facility? If so, you have a good eye and you probably work at Stayton! But fabrication looks about the same in Delaware.

By Cornelia Sprung on 2015 04 27.

I am interested in finding out more about RedBuild open web floor joist for residential.

For the past 15 years we have desiign our floors for L480 (even with dimensioal lumber) We pour 10’ basement walls, use TJI’s and end up boxing around mechanicals and spendind to much time and money firestopping and drafrstopping for the new IRC and IBC. Were can I get more info on RedBiuld Open web Joist

By Rolling Rock Construction Co on 2014 07 03.

Not sure why but I found your closing line hilarious. Probably because it’s corny, however it’s probably true as well! Good to know everything went well in the process. Shoppers will definitely be happy Im sure!

By Angela - Chicago Garage Builders on 2013 10 10.

Fantastic win against Scotland. Absalotely great. I curled against your Dad. was a wonderful man. I grew up on the farm where Art and Aggie now live. We have retired to Athabasca an d winter in Mesa, Az. watch all the. Curling to keep cool. best wishes at the Olympics next year. continue success .  Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 03.

Thank you for your support Mr. Ruddick. Team USA and RedBuilt are very appreciative.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Thanks Henry,

I am from Perryvale, my Dad was Ernie Lehto. Would have been great if he could have been here to watch. One tough end against both Sweden and Canada yesterday, but we will bounce back today.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Congratulations on being part of the worlds curling. Are you from the lehto family and which one from perryvale . Very best of luck. We are curling fans and watch all the games. Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 01.

A dedicated redbuilt blog reader.. Thanks for the curling coverage. Congratulations Darren and go team USA.

By bill ruddick on 2013 03 31.

Here is Heinz Mueller’s response:

You are correct, Renaldo. This application would show up more in a commercial structure vs. a residential structure. For an application such as this, I would think a moisture sealant applied to the glulam material would help alleviate the potential issues. That being said, if you decided to go that route you would probably want to start weighing the cost/benefit ratio for using additional products/services (sealant & application) vs. using similar products (LVL, I-joist blocking, etc.) for the blocking/rim board in the floor/roof system. I hope that helps. Thank you for the question and for your interest in the RedBuilt blogs! Heinz

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Here is a great reply that was posted to RedBuilt’s Linked In page:

Renaldo Montenegro, I am going to assume that using Glulams for blocking is more suited for a commercial application rather than a residential application. Thus, the Glulams carrying a very large vertical load from above. In a residential use I would see this as an over kill. Yes, I agree on the moisture content of the Glulams shrinking. Would a moisture sealant applied on the Glulams’ work in this case? A very good article! Thanks for sharing.

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Great to to hear this!!!

By Renaldo Montenegro on 2012 10 17.

Epically informative.  I learned a lot.

By Greg Riley on 2012 10 12.

[...] Posted on October 10, 2012 by [...]

By Deeper is Cheaper | RedBuilt Blog | Michael T. Dai on 2012 10 10.

[...] Call your local representative for a no cost consultation.  Read part 1 here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? (Part 2) | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 18.

[...] Read Part 2 of this article here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 17.

Great article Tom.  Not to intrude, but I would like to expand on how the Redbuilt Design Centers can help the engineer of record.  When I say help, I really mean increase the EOR’s profits while specifying a safer structural roof/floor system.  As I think back to my time as a specifying engineer, specifying Redbuilt’s Open Web trusses saved me time (I can go on about the differences between Redbuilt’s Pin Connected Open Web trusses and plated trusses but that is for another time).  When an EOR saves time, they in essence increase profits.

How does Redbuilt save an EOR time (great question)?  We do all the gravity calculations and truss connections for every loading aspect of a roof/floor system.  All the EOR has to do is specify a truss depth, truss series, show all design loads required and maybe a connection detail or two (with or without the help of a Redbuilt technical representative).  Also, if the EOR requires a PE to stamp both the shop drawing and calculations, our internal designers and engineers will provide technical oversight and assurance that products are used as intended. 

Not only can we save an EOR time but we also provide some assurance and piece of mind.

By Guy Brousseau on 2012 08 23.

Interesting to read about what you are doing, Jason.

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 29.

Sorry for the late response.  I’m glad you have enjoyed the first two.  The third was posted this past week.  It was a fun experience.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 28.

I know that learning involves failure, so thank you for being humble enough to learn.
Thank you, too, for sharing.  I’m enjoying your journey.

By Kathy Bracisco on 2012 07 24.

There is more to come.  This story will continue over the next few weeks and the whole world will know whether I was right or not.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I don’t want to give anything away because this story will continue over the next few weeks.  It was definitely an educational and enjoyable experience that I’m glad to share.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I’m guessing that you accurately predicted the failure.  I’m not an engineer, but you certainly made this understandable enough to read at my level.  Best wishes as you go for Level II!!

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 12.

Very interesting! I’m sure you will be right on.

By Norm Watts on 2012 07 12.

Thanks for the differentation of RedBuilt products.  I forwarded to two customers who wanted to know more about RedForm I joists vs. the “look alikes.”

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 25.

It is great to be a part of the legacy.  Thank you for sharing some perspective on what you are seeing both large-scale in the economy, and how the RedBuilt/legacy Trus Joist business has weathered storms in the past.

By Jeff Jack on 2012 06 23.

I like the blog and appreciate the wisdom in your words.  The focus on thriving vs. surviving is an inspiring shift of perspective.  Not easy, but RedBuilt will thrive without a doubt.  If it were easy everyone would be doing it.  RedBuilt has created a toe hold and a beginning.  Carry on.

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 20.

Hey Kurt -
I enjoyed reading this post about the old Tj and dealing with the last great recession.  I still remember those “PBL” days, wondering as a new hire if I would walk into work one day and find out that I didn’t have a job.  Fortunately that never happened, and I enjoyed the heck out of working for a great company like Trus Joist.
You guys at RedBuilt have got the old Tj culture and believe me, that will help drive your success.  All the best!
- Chris

By Chris Meyer on 2012 06 19.

Thanks Duane!  It certainly can be confusing.

By pdrace on 2012 06 16.

Great article, Paul. Nice job of laying it all out!

By Duane Bolt on 2012 06 15.

What I was impressed by was the load demand against the LVL iJoists while working in a residential market. Ya’ll make good stuff.

By Max Stanford on 2012 06 12.

back to blog

RedBuilt™ and Simpson Strong Tie – A Long History of Working Together to Ensure Quality Installation

Posted on May 15, 2012 by RedBuilt


by Dave Leister Design Tech at RedBuilt™ When RedBuilt sold a large dormitory project, we thought it would be like any other project.  However, when it came time to prepare the layout drawings and calculations for the project, something caught my eye: one of the details showed Simpson ITS joist hangers attached directly to a light gauge steel joist track.  I hadn’t seen this application in my 12 year career.  So, I consulted my Simpson catalog and discovered that there are no published values for this application. To find a solution to the problem, I called Thom Murphy with Simpson.  Thom confirmed that they did not have values for this particular application.  The initial simple solution was to replace the steel joist track with tube steel, a standard application for the ITS hanger.  However, given the scale of the project, the change proved to be very costly.  So, we went back to the drawing board, and asked Simpson if they would be willing to test the hangers for the application.  Thanks to our long history of working together and mutual benefit we would gain, Simpson agreed to perform the test. Getting the testing in a timely fashion was critical to maintaining the project schedule.  Dustin Muhn (Simpson –Pleasanton,CA) coordinated an effort to test the ITS to get usable data to continue the floor design. Processes such as these touch many people before getting the final answer; from concept, to test design, building the test specimens, performing the tests, and finally compiling the test results. Simpson is fortunate to have a wide area of expertise that included cold formed steel, engineered wood products, and the knowledge and facility to run an appropriate test. In the meanwhile, RedBuilt continued to work with the EOR transforming a complex set of structural plans into a set of shop drawings. The testing demonstrated that ITS hanger capacity on the light gauge steel track has a capacity limited by the required connection (4    - #10x3/4”self-tapping screws).  Although the capacity in this application is approximately 65% of the published capacity with nails on a wood plate, it was sufficient for most of the applications in this project.  The early identification of the potential issue and the rapid response by all parties not only kept the project on track while simultaneously keeping costs in check, but more importantly, prevented the use of hangers in some locations where they would have been over capacity.  In the end, the customer got just what they needed; an economical hanger and information in time to keep the project moving forward.


Leave a Reply

Did you notice that on page 4 we are showing table fabrication at our Stayton, OR facility? If so, you have a good eye and you probably work at Stayton! But fabrication looks about the same in Delaware.

By Cornelia Sprung on 2015 04 27.

I am interested in finding out more about RedBuild open web floor joist for residential.

For the past 15 years we have desiign our floors for L480 (even with dimensioal lumber) We pour 10’ basement walls, use TJI’s and end up boxing around mechanicals and spendind to much time and money firestopping and drafrstopping for the new IRC and IBC. Were can I get more info on RedBiuld Open web Joist

By Rolling Rock Construction Co on 2014 07 03.

Not sure why but I found your closing line hilarious. Probably because it’s corny, however it’s probably true as well! Good to know everything went well in the process. Shoppers will definitely be happy Im sure!

By Angela - Chicago Garage Builders on 2013 10 10.

Fantastic win against Scotland. Absalotely great. I curled against your Dad. was a wonderful man. I grew up on the farm where Art and Aggie now live. We have retired to Athabasca an d winter in Mesa, Az. watch all the. Curling to keep cool. best wishes at the Olympics next year. continue success .  Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 03.

Thank you for your support Mr. Ruddick. Team USA and RedBuilt are very appreciative.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Thanks Henry,

I am from Perryvale, my Dad was Ernie Lehto. Would have been great if he could have been here to watch. One tough end against both Sweden and Canada yesterday, but we will bounce back today.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Congratulations on being part of the worlds curling. Are you from the lehto family and which one from perryvale . Very best of luck. We are curling fans and watch all the games. Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 01.

A dedicated redbuilt blog reader.. Thanks for the curling coverage. Congratulations Darren and go team USA.

By bill ruddick on 2013 03 31.

Here is Heinz Mueller’s response:

You are correct, Renaldo. This application would show up more in a commercial structure vs. a residential structure. For an application such as this, I would think a moisture sealant applied to the glulam material would help alleviate the potential issues. That being said, if you decided to go that route you would probably want to start weighing the cost/benefit ratio for using additional products/services (sealant & application) vs. using similar products (LVL, I-joist blocking, etc.) for the blocking/rim board in the floor/roof system. I hope that helps. Thank you for the question and for your interest in the RedBuilt blogs! Heinz

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Here is a great reply that was posted to RedBuilt’s Linked In page:

Renaldo Montenegro, I am going to assume that using Glulams for blocking is more suited for a commercial application rather than a residential application. Thus, the Glulams carrying a very large vertical load from above. In a residential use I would see this as an over kill. Yes, I agree on the moisture content of the Glulams shrinking. Would a moisture sealant applied on the Glulams’ work in this case? A very good article! Thanks for sharing.

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Great to to hear this!!!

By Renaldo Montenegro on 2012 10 17.

Epically informative.  I learned a lot.

By Greg Riley on 2012 10 12.

[...] Posted on October 10, 2012 by [...]

By Deeper is Cheaper | RedBuilt Blog | Michael T. Dai on 2012 10 10.

[...] Call your local representative for a no cost consultation.  Read part 1 here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? (Part 2) | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 18.

[...] Read Part 2 of this article here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 17.

Great article Tom.  Not to intrude, but I would like to expand on how the Redbuilt Design Centers can help the engineer of record.  When I say help, I really mean increase the EOR’s profits while specifying a safer structural roof/floor system.  As I think back to my time as a specifying engineer, specifying Redbuilt’s Open Web trusses saved me time (I can go on about the differences between Redbuilt’s Pin Connected Open Web trusses and plated trusses but that is for another time).  When an EOR saves time, they in essence increase profits.

How does Redbuilt save an EOR time (great question)?  We do all the gravity calculations and truss connections for every loading aspect of a roof/floor system.  All the EOR has to do is specify a truss depth, truss series, show all design loads required and maybe a connection detail or two (with or without the help of a Redbuilt technical representative).  Also, if the EOR requires a PE to stamp both the shop drawing and calculations, our internal designers and engineers will provide technical oversight and assurance that products are used as intended. 

Not only can we save an EOR time but we also provide some assurance and piece of mind.

By Guy Brousseau on 2012 08 23.

Interesting to read about what you are doing, Jason.

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 29.

Sorry for the late response.  I’m glad you have enjoyed the first two.  The third was posted this past week.  It was a fun experience.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 28.

I know that learning involves failure, so thank you for being humble enough to learn.
Thank you, too, for sharing.  I’m enjoying your journey.

By Kathy Bracisco on 2012 07 24.

There is more to come.  This story will continue over the next few weeks and the whole world will know whether I was right or not.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I don’t want to give anything away because this story will continue over the next few weeks.  It was definitely an educational and enjoyable experience that I’m glad to share.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I’m guessing that you accurately predicted the failure.  I’m not an engineer, but you certainly made this understandable enough to read at my level.  Best wishes as you go for Level II!!

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 12.

Very interesting! I’m sure you will be right on.

By Norm Watts on 2012 07 12.

Thanks for the differentation of RedBuilt products.  I forwarded to two customers who wanted to know more about RedForm I joists vs. the “look alikes.”

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 25.

It is great to be a part of the legacy.  Thank you for sharing some perspective on what you are seeing both large-scale in the economy, and how the RedBuilt/legacy Trus Joist business has weathered storms in the past.

By Jeff Jack on 2012 06 23.

I like the blog and appreciate the wisdom in your words.  The focus on thriving vs. surviving is an inspiring shift of perspective.  Not easy, but RedBuilt will thrive without a doubt.  If it were easy everyone would be doing it.  RedBuilt has created a toe hold and a beginning.  Carry on.

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 20.

Hey Kurt -
I enjoyed reading this post about the old Tj and dealing with the last great recession.  I still remember those “PBL” days, wondering as a new hire if I would walk into work one day and find out that I didn’t have a job.  Fortunately that never happened, and I enjoyed the heck out of working for a great company like Trus Joist.
You guys at RedBuilt have got the old Tj culture and believe me, that will help drive your success.  All the best!
- Chris

By Chris Meyer on 2012 06 19.

Thanks Duane!  It certainly can be confusing.

By pdrace on 2012 06 16.

Great article, Paul. Nice job of laying it all out!

By Duane Bolt on 2012 06 15.

What I was impressed by was the load demand against the LVL iJoists while working in a residential market. Ya’ll make good stuff.

By Max Stanford on 2012 06 12.

back to blog

RedBuilt Fitness Challenge Winners: Team Three and a Half Men

Posted on May 08, 2012 by RedBuilt


by Peter Mellblom, Plant Manager for RedBuilt’s Delaware, Ohio Plant. Brian Coy, RJ Coy, and Roger Kennedy took up the RedBuilt™ fitness challenge with the intent on winning the whole enchilada.  These three and a half men knew it was possible to lose the equivalent of that extra half a person that seemed to be hanging around the middle. With the fitness challenge came the incentive to cut back on the maple bar breakfasts, the extra slice of pizza and push back from the table before taking a second plate. The team worked hard over the twelve week contest.  YMCA memberships came into play, extra workouts in the gym and plenty of time in the sauna.  Each team member also adopted healthier eating habits in spite of our vendors & sales folk dropping off donuts for break time. Each of the three set personal weight loss goals for the twelve week program and for extra motivation, a little side bet was laid down.  The one who lost the lowest percentage of weight is going to take the other two to the local Chinese buffet.  (Roger, aren’t you glad the team was only three people?) In the end the team lost 15% of their combined weight, 114 pounds or the equivalent of half a sturdy guy. Congratulations to all three of you keep going to the Y and eating healthy!
[caption id="attachment_220" align="alignnone" width="300" caption="RedBuilt Fitness Challenge 2012 Winners: Team 3 and a Half Men (from left to right: Roger Kennedy, RJ Coy and Brian Coy)"][/caption]
As a company, we collectively lost 888.6 pounds which amounts to a 6.6% average loss for all participants!


Leave a Reply

Did you notice that on page 4 we are showing table fabrication at our Stayton, OR facility? If so, you have a good eye and you probably work at Stayton! But fabrication looks about the same in Delaware.

By Cornelia Sprung on 2015 04 27.

I am interested in finding out more about RedBuild open web floor joist for residential.

For the past 15 years we have desiign our floors for L480 (even with dimensioal lumber) We pour 10’ basement walls, use TJI’s and end up boxing around mechanicals and spendind to much time and money firestopping and drafrstopping for the new IRC and IBC. Were can I get more info on RedBiuld Open web Joist

By Rolling Rock Construction Co on 2014 07 03.

Not sure why but I found your closing line hilarious. Probably because it’s corny, however it’s probably true as well! Good to know everything went well in the process. Shoppers will definitely be happy Im sure!

By Angela - Chicago Garage Builders on 2013 10 10.

Fantastic win against Scotland. Absalotely great. I curled against your Dad. was a wonderful man. I grew up on the farm where Art and Aggie now live. We have retired to Athabasca an d winter in Mesa, Az. watch all the. Curling to keep cool. best wishes at the Olympics next year. continue success .  Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 03.

Thank you for your support Mr. Ruddick. Team USA and RedBuilt are very appreciative.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Thanks Henry,

I am from Perryvale, my Dad was Ernie Lehto. Would have been great if he could have been here to watch. One tough end against both Sweden and Canada yesterday, but we will bounce back today.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Congratulations on being part of the worlds curling. Are you from the lehto family and which one from perryvale . Very best of luck. We are curling fans and watch all the games. Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 01.

A dedicated redbuilt blog reader.. Thanks for the curling coverage. Congratulations Darren and go team USA.

By bill ruddick on 2013 03 31.

Here is Heinz Mueller’s response:

You are correct, Renaldo. This application would show up more in a commercial structure vs. a residential structure. For an application such as this, I would think a moisture sealant applied to the glulam material would help alleviate the potential issues. That being said, if you decided to go that route you would probably want to start weighing the cost/benefit ratio for using additional products/services (sealant & application) vs. using similar products (LVL, I-joist blocking, etc.) for the blocking/rim board in the floor/roof system. I hope that helps. Thank you for the question and for your interest in the RedBuilt blogs! Heinz

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Here is a great reply that was posted to RedBuilt’s Linked In page:

Renaldo Montenegro, I am going to assume that using Glulams for blocking is more suited for a commercial application rather than a residential application. Thus, the Glulams carrying a very large vertical load from above. In a residential use I would see this as an over kill. Yes, I agree on the moisture content of the Glulams shrinking. Would a moisture sealant applied on the Glulams’ work in this case? A very good article! Thanks for sharing.

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Great to to hear this!!!

By Renaldo Montenegro on 2012 10 17.

Epically informative.  I learned a lot.

By Greg Riley on 2012 10 12.

[...] Posted on October 10, 2012 by [...]

By Deeper is Cheaper | RedBuilt Blog | Michael T. Dai on 2012 10 10.

[...] Call your local representative for a no cost consultation.  Read part 1 here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? (Part 2) | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 18.

[...] Read Part 2 of this article here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 17.

Great article Tom.  Not to intrude, but I would like to expand on how the Redbuilt Design Centers can help the engineer of record.  When I say help, I really mean increase the EOR’s profits while specifying a safer structural roof/floor system.  As I think back to my time as a specifying engineer, specifying Redbuilt’s Open Web trusses saved me time (I can go on about the differences between Redbuilt’s Pin Connected Open Web trusses and plated trusses but that is for another time).  When an EOR saves time, they in essence increase profits.

How does Redbuilt save an EOR time (great question)?  We do all the gravity calculations and truss connections for every loading aspect of a roof/floor system.  All the EOR has to do is specify a truss depth, truss series, show all design loads required and maybe a connection detail or two (with or without the help of a Redbuilt technical representative).  Also, if the EOR requires a PE to stamp both the shop drawing and calculations, our internal designers and engineers will provide technical oversight and assurance that products are used as intended. 

Not only can we save an EOR time but we also provide some assurance and piece of mind.

By Guy Brousseau on 2012 08 23.

Interesting to read about what you are doing, Jason.

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 29.

Sorry for the late response.  I’m glad you have enjoyed the first two.  The third was posted this past week.  It was a fun experience.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 28.

I know that learning involves failure, so thank you for being humble enough to learn.
Thank you, too, for sharing.  I’m enjoying your journey.

By Kathy Bracisco on 2012 07 24.

There is more to come.  This story will continue over the next few weeks and the whole world will know whether I was right or not.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I don’t want to give anything away because this story will continue over the next few weeks.  It was definitely an educational and enjoyable experience that I’m glad to share.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I’m guessing that you accurately predicted the failure.  I’m not an engineer, but you certainly made this understandable enough to read at my level.  Best wishes as you go for Level II!!

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 12.

Very interesting! I’m sure you will be right on.

By Norm Watts on 2012 07 12.

Thanks for the differentation of RedBuilt products.  I forwarded to two customers who wanted to know more about RedForm I joists vs. the “look alikes.”

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 25.

It is great to be a part of the legacy.  Thank you for sharing some perspective on what you are seeing both large-scale in the economy, and how the RedBuilt/legacy Trus Joist business has weathered storms in the past.

By Jeff Jack on 2012 06 23.

I like the blog and appreciate the wisdom in your words.  The focus on thriving vs. surviving is an inspiring shift of perspective.  Not easy, but RedBuilt will thrive without a doubt.  If it were easy everyone would be doing it.  RedBuilt has created a toe hold and a beginning.  Carry on.

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 20.

Hey Kurt -
I enjoyed reading this post about the old Tj and dealing with the last great recession.  I still remember those “PBL” days, wondering as a new hire if I would walk into work one day and find out that I didn’t have a job.  Fortunately that never happened, and I enjoyed the heck out of working for a great company like Trus Joist.
You guys at RedBuilt have got the old Tj culture and believe me, that will help drive your success.  All the best!
- Chris

By Chris Meyer on 2012 06 19.

Thanks Duane!  It certainly can be confusing.

By pdrace on 2012 06 16.

Great article, Paul. Nice job of laying it all out!

By Duane Bolt on 2012 06 15.

What I was impressed by was the load demand against the LVL iJoists while working in a residential market. Ya’ll make good stuff.

By Max Stanford on 2012 06 12.

back to blog

RedBuilt™ Solutions for Custom Home Designs

Posted on May 03, 2012 by RedBuilt


by Tom Byron, Technical Sales Representative for Northern Los Angeles county including the San Fernando Valley and Palmdale/Lancaster areas, Ventura County and Santa Barbara County. As innovations change the way we use our homes, designers must continue to push the envelope to find unique solutions to their customer’s needs. RedBuilt, the industry leader in Engineered Wood Products is uniquely positioned to help. RedBuilt’s Technical Sales and Design Teams, strategically located throughout the U.S. and Canada, have experience assisting architectural and engineering firms design custom homes with features such as indoor swimming pools, spas, movie theatres, bowling alleys, high ceilings and unique roof shapes.  These features in custom homes present the same engineering challenges RedBuilt has been designing solutions for commercial buildings for years. Long spans, shallow depths, A/C duct and plumbing penetrations, deflection and vibration control, multiple clear stories, arched ceiling, and cantilevers are all part of the RedBuilt solutions portfolio. Here are some examples of RedBuilt solutions to common residential design problems: Sloped Roofs: Reduce labor and material costs while maintaining a consistent slope by use of RedBuilt Tapered Red-I™ Joists or Tapered Open Web Trusses. There is no need to have the framer cut and install rip strips. Ventilation requirements and/or access for small plumbing or electrical lines: Have RedBuilt provide knockout holes in the I-Joist webs (not available in Tapered I-Joists). Large A/C and heating ducts perpendicular to layout: Use RedBuilt Open Web Trusses. Balcony floors: Outriggers can be attached to RedBuilt products or use tapered joists. Floor performance: Minimize vibration, bounce and deflection by using RedBuilt’s FloorChoice™ Floor Performance Rating Tool in our RedSpec™ Product Sizing Software to specify the correct floor for your application. Long Spans: Many of today’s homeowners are looking for the open feel of large spaces. RedBuilt’s long span Open Web Trusses (which are able to span well over 70’) are the perfect solution. Multi Story Walls: Use RedBuilt’s RedLam™ LVL studs to provide straight, tall walls. Unique ceiling shapes: RedBuilt Open Web Trusses have a variety of profiles: parallel chord, tapered, pitched, radius pitched, bow string, barrel, pitched top chord/radius bottom chord, scissor compound barrel and lenticular. Building component integration: Need to connect steel, concrete and wood products together with mechanical, plumbing, electrical components and systems into one award winning functional design? RedBuilt’s design team is used to working with other trade’s professionals to coordinate solutions for difficult engineering problems presented by today’s complex custom homes. As the industry leader, RedBuilt sets standards by employing Technical Sales Representatives throughout the United States. We can provide recommendations for contractors local to your project with the correct framing expertise. Wherever your project is located, we visit the jobsite to work hand in hand with framers, general contractors, project managers, architects and engineers to review the installation of our products and answer any questions. RedBuilt Engineers are able to review and seal your load calculations and shop drawing so you can provide submittals to building departments if required. This ensures that potential design issues such as connection details are worked out prior to construction so your project will proceed on schedule. So, next time you start a custom home, give your local RedBuilt Representative a call so we can add our team of problem solving technical representatives, designers and licensed professional engineers to your design team. [gallery order="DESC" columns="2"]


Leave a Reply

Did you notice that on page 4 we are showing table fabrication at our Stayton, OR facility? If so, you have a good eye and you probably work at Stayton! But fabrication looks about the same in Delaware.

By Cornelia Sprung on 2015 04 27.

I am interested in finding out more about RedBuild open web floor joist for residential.

For the past 15 years we have desiign our floors for L480 (even with dimensioal lumber) We pour 10’ basement walls, use TJI’s and end up boxing around mechanicals and spendind to much time and money firestopping and drafrstopping for the new IRC and IBC. Were can I get more info on RedBiuld Open web Joist

By Rolling Rock Construction Co on 2014 07 03.

Not sure why but I found your closing line hilarious. Probably because it’s corny, however it’s probably true as well! Good to know everything went well in the process. Shoppers will definitely be happy Im sure!

By Angela - Chicago Garage Builders on 2013 10 10.

Fantastic win against Scotland. Absalotely great. I curled against your Dad. was a wonderful man. I grew up on the farm where Art and Aggie now live. We have retired to Athabasca an d winter in Mesa, Az. watch all the. Curling to keep cool. best wishes at the Olympics next year. continue success .  Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 03.

Thank you for your support Mr. Ruddick. Team USA and RedBuilt are very appreciative.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Thanks Henry,

I am from Perryvale, my Dad was Ernie Lehto. Would have been great if he could have been here to watch. One tough end against both Sweden and Canada yesterday, but we will bounce back today.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Congratulations on being part of the worlds curling. Are you from the lehto family and which one from perryvale . Very best of luck. We are curling fans and watch all the games. Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 01.

A dedicated redbuilt blog reader.. Thanks for the curling coverage. Congratulations Darren and go team USA.

By bill ruddick on 2013 03 31.

Here is Heinz Mueller’s response:

You are correct, Renaldo. This application would show up more in a commercial structure vs. a residential structure. For an application such as this, I would think a moisture sealant applied to the glulam material would help alleviate the potential issues. That being said, if you decided to go that route you would probably want to start weighing the cost/benefit ratio for using additional products/services (sealant & application) vs. using similar products (LVL, I-joist blocking, etc.) for the blocking/rim board in the floor/roof system. I hope that helps. Thank you for the question and for your interest in the RedBuilt blogs! Heinz

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Here is a great reply that was posted to RedBuilt’s Linked In page:

Renaldo Montenegro, I am going to assume that using Glulams for blocking is more suited for a commercial application rather than a residential application. Thus, the Glulams carrying a very large vertical load from above. In a residential use I would see this as an over kill. Yes, I agree on the moisture content of the Glulams shrinking. Would a moisture sealant applied on the Glulams’ work in this case? A very good article! Thanks for sharing.

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Great to to hear this!!!

By Renaldo Montenegro on 2012 10 17.

Epically informative.  I learned a lot.

By Greg Riley on 2012 10 12.

[...] Posted on October 10, 2012 by [...]

By Deeper is Cheaper | RedBuilt Blog | Michael T. Dai on 2012 10 10.

[...] Call your local representative for a no cost consultation.  Read part 1 here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? (Part 2) | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 18.

[...] Read Part 2 of this article here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 17.

Great article Tom.  Not to intrude, but I would like to expand on how the Redbuilt Design Centers can help the engineer of record.  When I say help, I really mean increase the EOR’s profits while specifying a safer structural roof/floor system.  As I think back to my time as a specifying engineer, specifying Redbuilt’s Open Web trusses saved me time (I can go on about the differences between Redbuilt’s Pin Connected Open Web trusses and plated trusses but that is for another time).  When an EOR saves time, they in essence increase profits.

How does Redbuilt save an EOR time (great question)?  We do all the gravity calculations and truss connections for every loading aspect of a roof/floor system.  All the EOR has to do is specify a truss depth, truss series, show all design loads required and maybe a connection detail or two (with or without the help of a Redbuilt technical representative).  Also, if the EOR requires a PE to stamp both the shop drawing and calculations, our internal designers and engineers will provide technical oversight and assurance that products are used as intended. 

Not only can we save an EOR time but we also provide some assurance and piece of mind.

By Guy Brousseau on 2012 08 23.

Interesting to read about what you are doing, Jason.

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 29.

Sorry for the late response.  I’m glad you have enjoyed the first two.  The third was posted this past week.  It was a fun experience.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 28.

I know that learning involves failure, so thank you for being humble enough to learn.
Thank you, too, for sharing.  I’m enjoying your journey.

By Kathy Bracisco on 2012 07 24.

There is more to come.  This story will continue over the next few weeks and the whole world will know whether I was right or not.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I don’t want to give anything away because this story will continue over the next few weeks.  It was definitely an educational and enjoyable experience that I’m glad to share.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I’m guessing that you accurately predicted the failure.  I’m not an engineer, but you certainly made this understandable enough to read at my level.  Best wishes as you go for Level II!!

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 12.

Very interesting! I’m sure you will be right on.

By Norm Watts on 2012 07 12.

Thanks for the differentation of RedBuilt products.  I forwarded to two customers who wanted to know more about RedForm I joists vs. the “look alikes.”

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 25.

It is great to be a part of the legacy.  Thank you for sharing some perspective on what you are seeing both large-scale in the economy, and how the RedBuilt/legacy Trus Joist business has weathered storms in the past.

By Jeff Jack on 2012 06 23.

I like the blog and appreciate the wisdom in your words.  The focus on thriving vs. surviving is an inspiring shift of perspective.  Not easy, but RedBuilt will thrive without a doubt.  If it were easy everyone would be doing it.  RedBuilt has created a toe hold and a beginning.  Carry on.

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 20.

Hey Kurt -
I enjoyed reading this post about the old Tj and dealing with the last great recession.  I still remember those “PBL” days, wondering as a new hire if I would walk into work one day and find out that I didn’t have a job.  Fortunately that never happened, and I enjoyed the heck out of working for a great company like Trus Joist.
You guys at RedBuilt have got the old Tj culture and believe me, that will help drive your success.  All the best!
- Chris

By Chris Meyer on 2012 06 19.

Thanks Duane!  It certainly can be confusing.

By pdrace on 2012 06 16.

Great article, Paul. Nice job of laying it all out!

By Duane Bolt on 2012 06 15.

What I was impressed by was the load demand against the LVL iJoists while working in a residential market. Ya’ll make good stuff.

By Max Stanford on 2012 06 12.

back to blog

RedBuilt Recognizes and Rewards Health of their Associates

Posted on April 26, 2012 by RedBuilt


By Jeff Jack, Manufacturing Technical Director at RedBuilt Every one of us knows the personal benefits of healthy life choices like proper diet, regular exercise, and achieving/maintaining a healthy weight.  We all have different motivations for making these decisions… how it makes me look or feel, being able to enjoy life more with my family/friends, achieving a goal, etc.  It is great when a company offers programs for their employees that helps provide additional motivation. Over the last 3 years, RedBuilt has developed two programs for helping their employees along the way: HealthNuts is a year-round, optional self-tracked and self-reported program for all RedBuilt associates to track their physical activities.  This program rewards RedBuilt associates for achieving target point values each year through regular physical exercise.  Last year over 10% of the RedBuilt associates achieved the Level 1 award by earning 300 points (the equivalent of running 300 miles).  Two of RedBuilt’s associates (Russ Masters and Rick Carter) achieved the highest award level of 1500 points (about the equivalent of running roundtrip from between RedBuilt’s manufacturing facilities in Stayton, OR and Chino, CA)! The RedBuilt Fitness Challenge is a 12 week, team-based weight-loss challenge.  This year’s challenge has 12 teams, and involves almost 25% of RedBuilt associates.  The competition ended on April 25th, 2011 and we are waiting to find out who will claim the honor associated with being “the biggest losers”.  Look out for the an update on the winning team! [gallery order="DESC" columns="2" orderby="post_date"]  


Leave a Reply

Did you notice that on page 4 we are showing table fabrication at our Stayton, OR facility? If so, you have a good eye and you probably work at Stayton! But fabrication looks about the same in Delaware.

By Cornelia Sprung on 2015 04 27.

I am interested in finding out more about RedBuild open web floor joist for residential.

For the past 15 years we have desiign our floors for L480 (even with dimensioal lumber) We pour 10’ basement walls, use TJI’s and end up boxing around mechanicals and spendind to much time and money firestopping and drafrstopping for the new IRC and IBC. Were can I get more info on RedBiuld Open web Joist

By Rolling Rock Construction Co on 2014 07 03.

Not sure why but I found your closing line hilarious. Probably because it’s corny, however it’s probably true as well! Good to know everything went well in the process. Shoppers will definitely be happy Im sure!

By Angela - Chicago Garage Builders on 2013 10 10.

Fantastic win against Scotland. Absalotely great. I curled against your Dad. was a wonderful man. I grew up on the farm where Art and Aggie now live. We have retired to Athabasca an d winter in Mesa, Az. watch all the. Curling to keep cool. best wishes at the Olympics next year. continue success .  Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 03.

Thank you for your support Mr. Ruddick. Team USA and RedBuilt are very appreciative.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Thanks Henry,

I am from Perryvale, my Dad was Ernie Lehto. Would have been great if he could have been here to watch. One tough end against both Sweden and Canada yesterday, but we will bounce back today.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Congratulations on being part of the worlds curling. Are you from the lehto family and which one from perryvale . Very best of luck. We are curling fans and watch all the games. Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 01.

A dedicated redbuilt blog reader.. Thanks for the curling coverage. Congratulations Darren and go team USA.

By bill ruddick on 2013 03 31.

Here is Heinz Mueller’s response:

You are correct, Renaldo. This application would show up more in a commercial structure vs. a residential structure. For an application such as this, I would think a moisture sealant applied to the glulam material would help alleviate the potential issues. That being said, if you decided to go that route you would probably want to start weighing the cost/benefit ratio for using additional products/services (sealant & application) vs. using similar products (LVL, I-joist blocking, etc.) for the blocking/rim board in the floor/roof system. I hope that helps. Thank you for the question and for your interest in the RedBuilt blogs! Heinz

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Here is a great reply that was posted to RedBuilt’s Linked In page:

Renaldo Montenegro, I am going to assume that using Glulams for blocking is more suited for a commercial application rather than a residential application. Thus, the Glulams carrying a very large vertical load from above. In a residential use I would see this as an over kill. Yes, I agree on the moisture content of the Glulams shrinking. Would a moisture sealant applied on the Glulams’ work in this case? A very good article! Thanks for sharing.

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Great to to hear this!!!

By Renaldo Montenegro on 2012 10 17.

Epically informative.  I learned a lot.

By Greg Riley on 2012 10 12.

[...] Posted on October 10, 2012 by [...]

By Deeper is Cheaper | RedBuilt Blog | Michael T. Dai on 2012 10 10.

[...] Call your local representative for a no cost consultation.  Read part 1 here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? (Part 2) | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 18.

[...] Read Part 2 of this article here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 17.

Great article Tom.  Not to intrude, but I would like to expand on how the Redbuilt Design Centers can help the engineer of record.  When I say help, I really mean increase the EOR’s profits while specifying a safer structural roof/floor system.  As I think back to my time as a specifying engineer, specifying Redbuilt’s Open Web trusses saved me time (I can go on about the differences between Redbuilt’s Pin Connected Open Web trusses and plated trusses but that is for another time).  When an EOR saves time, they in essence increase profits.

How does Redbuilt save an EOR time (great question)?  We do all the gravity calculations and truss connections for every loading aspect of a roof/floor system.  All the EOR has to do is specify a truss depth, truss series, show all design loads required and maybe a connection detail or two (with or without the help of a Redbuilt technical representative).  Also, if the EOR requires a PE to stamp both the shop drawing and calculations, our internal designers and engineers will provide technical oversight and assurance that products are used as intended. 

Not only can we save an EOR time but we also provide some assurance and piece of mind.

By Guy Brousseau on 2012 08 23.

Interesting to read about what you are doing, Jason.

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 29.

Sorry for the late response.  I’m glad you have enjoyed the first two.  The third was posted this past week.  It was a fun experience.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 28.

I know that learning involves failure, so thank you for being humble enough to learn.
Thank you, too, for sharing.  I’m enjoying your journey.

By Kathy Bracisco on 2012 07 24.

There is more to come.  This story will continue over the next few weeks and the whole world will know whether I was right or not.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I don’t want to give anything away because this story will continue over the next few weeks.  It was definitely an educational and enjoyable experience that I’m glad to share.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I’m guessing that you accurately predicted the failure.  I’m not an engineer, but you certainly made this understandable enough to read at my level.  Best wishes as you go for Level II!!

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 12.

Very interesting! I’m sure you will be right on.

By Norm Watts on 2012 07 12.

Thanks for the differentation of RedBuilt products.  I forwarded to two customers who wanted to know more about RedForm I joists vs. the “look alikes.”

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 25.

It is great to be a part of the legacy.  Thank you for sharing some perspective on what you are seeing both large-scale in the economy, and how the RedBuilt/legacy Trus Joist business has weathered storms in the past.

By Jeff Jack on 2012 06 23.

I like the blog and appreciate the wisdom in your words.  The focus on thriving vs. surviving is an inspiring shift of perspective.  Not easy, but RedBuilt will thrive without a doubt.  If it were easy everyone would be doing it.  RedBuilt has created a toe hold and a beginning.  Carry on.

By Greg Riley on 2012 06 20.

Hey Kurt -
I enjoyed reading this post about the old Tj and dealing with the last great recession.  I still remember those “PBL” days, wondering as a new hire if I would walk into work one day and find out that I didn’t have a job.  Fortunately that never happened, and I enjoyed the heck out of working for a great company like Trus Joist.
You guys at RedBuilt have got the old Tj culture and believe me, that will help drive your success.  All the best!
- Chris

By Chris Meyer on 2012 06 19.

Thanks Duane!  It certainly can be confusing.

By pdrace on 2012 06 16.

Great article, Paul. Nice job of laying it all out!

By Duane Bolt on 2012 06 15.

What I was impressed by was the load demand against the LVL iJoists while working in a residential market. Ya’ll make good stuff.

By Max Stanford on 2012 06 12.

back to blog

RedBuilt™ Product Offering Changing for FSC Certified Wood

Posted on April 16, 2012 by RedBuilt


By Jeff Jack, Manufacturing Technical Director at RedBuilt The continually growing demand for certified wood products that has been created largely from green building programs (like LEED for New Construction and a handful of others) has reshaped the way many companies in the forest products industries are conducting business. RedBuilt™ has been proud to obtain FSC chain-of-custody at all four of our manufacturing facilities for our core manufactured products. Challenges in maintaining this program have led RedBuilt™ to rationalize our product offering.  The primary challenge leading to this rationalization has been sourcing some of the high grade lumber raw materials in some of our product lines.  The result is that we are no longer able to offer FSC solid sawn MSR chords in our open web trusses.  The good news is that we can continue to manufacture open web trusses with FSC RedLam™ chords. The net result is that with the exception of the Red-W™ series open web truss, we are able to continue to offer our open trusses with FSC chords. The following is the summary of RedBuilt’s current FSC certified product offering:

  • Red-I™ i-joists (all series and sizes)
  • RedLam™ LVL beams and headers (all sizes)
  • RedLam™ LVL Rimboard: 1.5” thick: up to 16” depth 1.75” thick: up to 18” depth Other thicknesses:  all depths
  •  Red-L™, Red-S™, Red-M™, Red-H™ trusses: RedLam™ LVL chords only, All sizes
  • Glulam beams:  (all standard grades and sizes)
  • Factory attached accessories:  (all sizes)
This list has been slightly reduced from the previous offering to help maintain feasibility of the FSC program, and ensure that we can consistently deliver the services and products to meet your schedule. Further information about RedBuilt’s products and support services for green building projects is available at (www.redbuilt.com/process/green_building.aspx)


Leave a Reply

Did you notice that on page 4 we are showing table fabrication at our Stayton, OR facility? If so, you have a good eye and you probably work at Stayton! But fabrication looks about the same in Delaware.

By Cornelia Sprung on 2015 04 27.

I am interested in finding out more about RedBuild open web floor joist for residential.

For the past 15 years we have desiign our floors for L480 (even with dimensioal lumber) We pour 10’ basement walls, use TJI’s and end up boxing around mechanicals and spendind to much time and money firestopping and drafrstopping for the new IRC and IBC. Were can I get more info on RedBiuld Open web Joist

By Rolling Rock Construction Co on 2014 07 03.

Not sure why but I found your closing line hilarious. Probably because it’s corny, however it’s probably true as well! Good to know everything went well in the process. Shoppers will definitely be happy Im sure!

By Angela - Chicago Garage Builders on 2013 10 10.

Fantastic win against Scotland. Absalotely great. I curled against your Dad. was a wonderful man. I grew up on the farm where Art and Aggie now live. We have retired to Athabasca an d winter in Mesa, Az. watch all the. Curling to keep cool. best wishes at the Olympics next year. continue success .  Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 03.

Thank you for your support Mr. Ruddick. Team USA and RedBuilt are very appreciative.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Thanks Henry,

I am from Perryvale, my Dad was Ernie Lehto. Would have been great if he could have been here to watch. One tough end against both Sweden and Canada yesterday, but we will bounce back today.

Darren

By Darren Lehto on 2013 04 02.

Congratulations on being part of the worlds curling. Are you from the lehto family and which one from perryvale . Very best of luck. We are curling fans and watch all the games. Henry

By Henry poczynek on 2013 04 01.

A dedicated redbuilt blog reader.. Thanks for the curling coverage. Congratulations Darren and go team USA.

By bill ruddick on 2013 03 31.

Here is Heinz Mueller’s response:

You are correct, Renaldo. This application would show up more in a commercial structure vs. a residential structure. For an application such as this, I would think a moisture sealant applied to the glulam material would help alleviate the potential issues. That being said, if you decided to go that route you would probably want to start weighing the cost/benefit ratio for using additional products/services (sealant & application) vs. using similar products (LVL, I-joist blocking, etc.) for the blocking/rim board in the floor/roof system. I hope that helps. Thank you for the question and for your interest in the RedBuilt blogs! Heinz

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Here is a great reply that was posted to RedBuilt’s Linked In page:

Renaldo Montenegro, I am going to assume that using Glulams for blocking is more suited for a commercial application rather than a residential application. Thus, the Glulams carrying a very large vertical load from above. In a residential use I would see this as an over kill. Yes, I agree on the moisture content of the Glulams shrinking. Would a moisture sealant applied on the Glulams’ work in this case? A very good article! Thanks for sharing.

By RedBuilt on 2012 12 04.

Great to to hear this!!!

By Renaldo Montenegro on 2012 10 17.

Epically informative.  I learned a lot.

By Greg Riley on 2012 10 12.

[...] Posted on October 10, 2012 by [...]

By Deeper is Cheaper | RedBuilt Blog | Michael T. Dai on 2012 10 10.

[...] Call your local representative for a no cost consultation.  Read part 1 here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? (Part 2) | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 18.

[...] Read Part 2 of this article here. [...]

By Why RedBuilt™? | RedBuilt Blog on 2012 09 17.

Great article Tom.  Not to intrude, but I would like to expand on how the Redbuilt Design Centers can help the engineer of record.  When I say help, I really mean increase the EOR’s profits while specifying a safer structural roof/floor system.  As I think back to my time as a specifying engineer, specifying Redbuilt’s Open Web trusses saved me time (I can go on about the differences between Redbuilt’s Pin Connected Open Web trusses and plated trusses but that is for another time).  When an EOR saves time, they in essence increase profits.

How does Redbuilt save an EOR time (great question)?  We do all the gravity calculations and truss connections for every loading aspect of a roof/floor system.  All the EOR has to do is specify a truss depth, truss series, show all design loads required and maybe a connection detail or two (with or without the help of a Redbuilt technical representative).  Also, if the EOR requires a PE to stamp both the shop drawing and calculations, our internal designers and engineers will provide technical oversight and assurance that products are used as intended. 

Not only can we save an EOR time but we also provide some assurance and piece of mind.

By Guy Brousseau on 2012 08 23.

Interesting to read about what you are doing, Jason.

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 29.

Sorry for the late response.  I’m glad you have enjoyed the first two.  The third was posted this past week.  It was a fun experience.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 28.

I know that learning involves failure, so thank you for being humble enough to learn.
Thank you, too, for sharing.  I’m enjoying your journey.

By Kathy Bracisco on 2012 07 24.

There is more to come.  This story will continue over the next few weeks and the whole world will know whether I was right or not.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I don’t want to give anything away because this story will continue over the next few weeks.  It was definitely an educational and enjoyable experience that I’m glad to share.

By Jason Fitch on 2012 07 13.

I’m guessing that you accurately predicted the failure.  I’m not an engineer, but you certainly made this understandable enough to read at my level.  Best wishes as you go for Level II!!

By Kristin Young on 2012 07 12.

Very interesting! I’m sure you will be right on.

By Norm Watts on 2012 07 12.

Thanks for the differentation of RedBuilt products.  I forwarded to two customers who wanted to know more about RedForm I joists vs. the “look alikes.”